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WW2 Dogfight R1: Republic P-47 Thunderbolt vs. Grumman F6F Hellcat

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  • #16
    And advances to Round Two!

    -Matt
    SGT, 210th MP Battalion, 2nd MP BDE, MSSG

    Fervently PRO-TRUMP, anti-Islam and anti-Steelers!

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    • #17
      Tough. I think I would have to call it a tie, as both were amazing airplanes in themselves.

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      • #18
        Neither, both were made for different theaters of war and each performed admirably within those parameters and they are not interchangeable within those parameters.

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        • #19
          Hellcat

          I don't remember the 'Jug' getting the type of reaction from pilots that the Hellcat did. Many pilots used to pat their aircraft after getting home, and name them with nose art. I would hazard a guess that the Hellcat was a lot easier to show someone how to fly. This made carrier landings a breeze, even with damage.

          Cannot recall the 'Jug' engendering so much fanny patting.

          just my two cents now the contest is over.
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          • #20
            Originally posted by Drusus Nero View Post
            I don't remember the 'Jug' getting the type of reaction from pilots that the Hellcat did. Many pilots used to pat their aircraft after getting home, and name them with nose art. I would hazard a guess that the Hellcat was a lot easier to show someone how to fly. This made carrier landings a breeze, even with damage.

            Cannot recall the 'Jug' engendering so much fanny patting.

            just my two cents now the contest is over.
            Yet the major ace in Europe, Jablonski, flew Jugs exclusively and described it as a powerful beast that could absorb immense damage and keep on attacking, and he loved that great big radial engine sitting between him and an attacker. A lot of Jug pilots referred to it a a "flying tank" and it could carry a lot of ordnance.

            When the four-blade prop made it's debut, the Jug could climb straight up and hang for a moment on sheer engine power while the pilot poured the fire from eight .50's into the enemy.

            The P-47 was one of the fighters that coninued service well into the early jet age.
            Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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            • #21
              Have to agree with CAPAndrew and CVASailor, it's a tie. Each plane had it's own place of importance in its' own theater of operations. That being said, in the scheme and flow of history, the Jug was super-important for the USAAF in the ETO as it served very well in the early stages of USAAF flights over Europe. Many of the early experience and lessons were gained and passed on by pilots who fought and survived in Jugs who would had a poorer chance to survive in planes with less durability.

              Those pilots used that experience to great effect in the P-51 when they had to cover the heavies. However, the P47 gave nothing away to the Mustangs; they excelled in ground attack and were much much more survivable from battle damage unlike the liquid cooled a/c.

              BTW, MM, I think you're actually referring to Gabby Gabreski of 56th FG fame, who kept the 56th in P-47s when the 4th and others transitioned over to the Mustang which was better at range for escorting the heavies. Jablonski is the guy who wrote Air War, Double Strike and bunch of other military history stuff. He was actually an artillery guy.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                Yet the major ace in Europe, Jablonski, flew Jugs exclusively and described it as a powerful beast that could absorb immense damage and keep on attacking, and he loved that great big radial engine sitting between him and an attacker. A lot of Jug pilots referred to it a a "flying tank" and it could carry a lot of ordnance.

                When the four-blade prop made it's debut, the Jug could climb straight up and hang for a moment on sheer engine power while the pilot poured the fire from eight .50's into the enemy.

                The P-47 was one of the fighters that coninued service well into the early jet age.
                Francis Stanley "Gabby" Gabreski was the leading ace in Europe. He did fly the P-47

                “Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth.” -- Albert Einstein

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by slick24 View Post
                  Francis Stanley "Gabby" Gabreski was the leading ace in Europe. He did fly the P-47
                  I think you mean 'leading U.S ace in Europe'

                  Paul
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                  • #24
                    What people may have missed in this poll is both Fighters used the same engine (so did the Corsair!).

                    Pruitt
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                    • #25
                      Both were great aircraft, the ability of the pilot and tactics might have some influence in a dog fight.
                      The F6F may have resembled the F4F but it was an entirely different design.
                      Both the P-47 and the F6F were tough aircraft, had dependable engines, and could take a hell of a lot of damage.
                      I have spoken with men who flew them each and they always loved them, their lives depended on them and they survived.
                      The Jug has the edge on the F6F.
                      Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post
                        I think you mean 'leading U.S ace in Europe'

                        Paul
                        yeah I meant that..sorry for any confusion

                        “Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth.” -- Albert Einstein

                        The US Constitution doesn't need to be rewritten it needs to be reread

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