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Alexander the Great vs. Julius Caesar (Round II)

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  • #16
    I don't think it's tough. Alex beat steppe horsemen, Caesar beat the Gauls (equivalent campaign there), Alex beat major armies, so did Caesar, Alex forced a river crossing when the river was guarded, Caesar did not. Alex's crossing is still studied today. Alex also beat whole new armies which had elephants and won, and he beat forces in the mountains of what is nowe Afghanistan.

    In short, Alex fought every foe imaginable at the time and won every time.

    He adapted tactics and strategy as needed over and over again.

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    • #17
      Voted for the Greek. I'm a big fan of Julie, but I think Alex would get a better start and his lieutenants would be more loyal.
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      • #18
        Iberia was Rome's Vietnam. It took a century and constant war against a tricky foe. Alexander won against a similar foe in Bactria, but Caesar defeated a stronger and historic foe of Rome in eight years and singlehandedly doubled the size of the empire.

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        • #19
          Brkitain and Germany also qualify for rome's Vietnam--Germany fits because Rome gave upon Germany.

          And if Julius doubled an existing empire, Alexander created an empire.

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          • #20
            Yes but Caesar's expanded territory remained a bulwark of strength for Rome. Alexander's descended into a playground for unimaginative and megalomaniacal tyrants that served Greek culture in no way. Victor Davis Hanson contends that they actually ended its golden age decisively.

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            • #21
              Alexander by far. I think it's a safe bet considering Julius Caesar felt the same way.

              Caesar once stared a statue of Alexander the Great and started to weep saying that Alexander had died as old as Caesar was at the time and Caesar continued on about how he had not accomplished anything compared to Alexander the Great.

              Besides, if Caesar had not turned Rome into an Empire, somebody else would. Pompey, Sulla, and Gaius Marius were all essentially dictators at different times. Caesar just took it one step further.

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              • #22
                Welcome to the forums!

                Interesting place for your 1st post.
                History is the version of past events that people have decided to agree upon. Napoleon Bonaparte
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                • #23
                  Thanks!

                  Yeah, well, I just picked up the 100 Greatest Generals issue and wanted to check out how the voting's going. As I think Alexander is the greatest general in history, I thought I'd give my two cents in this match-up.

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                  • #24
                    Cripes, this is really one for the books.

                    Alexander toppled a decrepit regime by winning three big battles, and did it by instint and balls rather than tastical genious.
                    Sure, he took a lot of ground, but that is not the biggest measure of Generalship.

                    Hell, when they asked Monty who the three greatest Generals in History were, he said "the other two were Ceaser and Napoleon".

                    Obnoxious as hell, but memorable.
                    "Why is the Rum gone?"

                    -Captain Jack

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Exorcist View Post
                      Cripes, this is really one for the books.

                      Alexander toppled a decrepit regime by winning three big battles, and did it by instint and balls rather than tastical genious.
                      Sure, he took a lot of ground, but that is not the biggest measure of Generalship.

                      Hell, when they asked Monty who the three greatest Generals in History were, he said "the other two were Ceaser and Napoleon".

                      Obnoxious as hell, but memorable.
                      And it proves Monty wasn't mistaken on only one of his picks.

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                      • #26
                        The legion is more effective in any terrain than the phalanx, but the macedonian cavalry rocks! Actually I voted for Caesar (right or wrong, it's my country!)
                        A ME LE GUARDIE
                        "Di noi tremň la nostra vecchia gloria. Tre secoli di fede e una vittoria". Gabriele D'Annunzio

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Keldren242 View Post
                          Caesar once stared a statue of Alexander the Great and started to weep saying that Alexander had died as old as Caesar was at the time and Caesar continued on about how he had not accomplished anything compared to Alexander the Great.
                          So sayeth the poets.....

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                          • #28
                            Caesar. Alexander never faced a foe as tough as Caesar did. OTHER ROMANS! And Caesar won.
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                            • #29
                              Plus Caesar's political machinations set up an empire that would last for the next fifteen-hundred years. (Yes, I'm including the Byzantines). Alexander's empire fell apart, and didn't even provide any lasting cultural influences to the regions he conquered. Plus, if you look at his battles against the Persians, he basically used the same technique every time. Oblique advance, open up a gap on the right, exploit gap with companions, lather, rinse, repeat.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Alina View Post
                                Plus Caesar's political machinations set up an empire that would last for the next fifteen-hundred years. (Yes, I'm including the Byzantines). Alexander's empire fell apart, and didn't even provide any lasting cultural influences to the regions he conquered. Plus, if you look at his battles against the Persians, he basically used the same technique every time. Oblique advance, open up a gap on the right, exploit gap with companions, lather, rinse, repeat.
                                Look at Alexander's battles against the Indians, the steppe horsemen and the mountaineers to see how he won against all foes--he rose to the occasion every single time.

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