Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

100 Greatest Generals! [Begins Feb. 1, 2008]

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by CyberRanger View Post
    yes ....
    Even better! If this keeps up, I'll have more medals than some tinpot dictator for life.
    Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
      Even better! If this keeps up, I'll have more medals than some tinpot dictator for life.
      i cant wait, let the debating commence..!!!!!

      Comment


      • #18
        I'm kinda appalled the Saladin was on the list, but not the guy who defeated him at every turn Richard Coeur de Lion (Richard the Lionhearted). Held together the Angevin Empire, did lots of really good things. Only thing bad about him was he didn't take Jerusalem, but honestly he knew the Crusaders couldn't keep Jerusalem so concentrated on the Outer Mer portion which did survive for a 100 years after his death thanks to what he did.
        Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

        "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

        Comment


        • #19
          Sounds very good, can't wait.
          Never Fear the Event

          Admiral Lord Nelson

          Comment


          • #20
            I'm in, but i haven't seen the list yet--will pick up the mag ASAP.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by grognard View Post
              I'm in, but i haven't seen the list yet--will pick up the mag ASAP.
              Yippee! My ACG March issue arrived in the mail today. Time to study up for the contest!

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by salinator View Post
                You didn't see Giap?
                Oh sure. We have over 2000 years of history so the one who makes the list is the one that wontonly sacrificed his own men. Nice!

                Personally I don't think he was that skilled as a general. He just threw bodies at the problem. Yet there were plenty of really good ones that could have been chosen. Oh well.

                Comment


                • #23
                  'Best on water'?
                  Colonel Summers' widely quoted critique of US strategy in the Vietnam War is having a modest vogue...it is poor history, poor strategy, and poor Clausewitz to boot - Robet Komer, Survival, 27:2, p. 94.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by thejester View Post
                    'Best on water'?

                    Admirals=Generals. Self explanatory, I thought.
                    Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Best on Horseback: Alexander hmm... ok, but Lee ??
                      - Your Highness, the enemy is so numerous... they outnumber your army.
                      - My friend, first I beat 'em then I'll count 'em
                      (Polish King Jan III Sobieski during his campaigns)

                      Historia Wojskowa Portal Historyczno-Wojskowy phw.org.pl

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
                        Best on Horseback: Alexander hmm... ok, but Lee ??
                        I don't for a fact how skilled Lee was, but Traveller (his horse) is arguably the most revered horse in US military history. Here is an exerpt from the Lee Chapel and Museum:

                        Outside of the glass doors are the rburied emains of Traveller. Traveller was Lee's renowned horse, purchased by Lee in 1862. His faithful companion throughout the Civil War, Traveller became a well-known figure on the campus of Washington College. He lived in the stables next to the President's house (which now serves as the garage to the Lee House). Traveller died in 1871 from lockjaw after stepping on a rusty nail. He was originally buried on campus but his bones were exhumed to be preserved. They were on display for a number of years on campus before being reinterred at this spot in 1971. The Virginia Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy donated the plaque in his memory. Today, people often leave apples, carrots or coins in remembrance of Traveller.
                        He was West Point trained and spent a life on horseback, so I would think he would be skilled as a horseman.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Biscuit View Post
                          I don't for a fact how skilled Lee was, but Traveller (his horse) is arguably the most revered horse in US military history. Here is an exerpt from the Lee Chapel and Museum:
                          Well, this is a 100 gratest horses in history?
                          I think, that Napoleon spent much more time on horseback. From Moscow to Madrid and all over Europe ... few times.
                          If main argue is distance rode a horse then I put Ghenghis Khan.
                          The best cavalry commander is another point.
                          And the last critery is overal lookin on the saddles.
                          Hmm... only the last one is fine for Lee but not enought for "Greatest...", I think.
                          I like these painting:
                          Last edited by [email protected]; 17 Jan 08, 16:57.
                          - Your Highness, the enemy is so numerous... they outnumber your army.
                          - My friend, first I beat 'em then I'll count 'em
                          (Polish King Jan III Sobieski during his campaigns)

                          Historia Wojskowa Portal Historyczno-Wojskowy phw.org.pl

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
                            Well, this is a 100 gratest horses in history?
                            I think, that Napoleon spent much more time on horseback. From Moscow to Madrid and all over Europe ... few times.
                            If main argue is distance rode a horse then I put Ghenghis Khan.
                            The best cavalry commander is another point.
                            And the last critery is overal lookin on the saddles.
                            Hmm... only the last one is fine for Lee but not enought for "Greatest...", I think.
                            I like these painting:
                            Before actual battles, Napoleon spent alot of his time in carriages while on campaign. He might've rode in Italy on horseback, but after Emperor status, it was carriage time.
                            Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by thejester View Post
                              'Best on water'?
                              Should be crazy surfer Bill Kilgore from Apocalypse Now
                              Sadly he was Lieutenant Colonel only.
                              Last edited by [email protected]; 17 Jan 08, 17:15.
                              - Your Highness, the enemy is so numerous... they outnumber your army.
                              - My friend, first I beat 'em then I'll count 'em
                              (Polish King Jan III Sobieski during his campaigns)

                              Historia Wojskowa Portal Historyczno-Wojskowy phw.org.pl

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Fair enough, let me look for a few sources. Unfortunately, most of my books are at home and everything will have to come off the internet.

                                http://www.stratfordhall.org/rel.html?HISTORY
                                At the outbreak of the Mexican-American War in 1846, Robert was ordered to Mexico as a supervisor of road construction. His skills as a cavalryman in reconnaissance, however, soon captured the attention of General Winfield Scott, who came to rely on Robert for his sharp military expertise. It was in Mexico that Lee learned the battlefield tactics that would serve him so well in coming years.
                                http://www.answers.com/topic/robert-e-lee#copyright
                                On the staff of Scott, he performed reconnaissance and co-ordination duties with distinction during the Mexican war but was only a cavalry colonel when Scott called him to Washington and offered him overall field command in the midst of the secession crisis.
                                http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-4122/Robert-E-Lee
                                Commissioned into the elite engineering corps, later transferring to the cavalry because of slow advancement in the engineers, he did the best he could at routine assignments and on relatively uninspiring engineering projects. Not until the Mexican War (1846–48), when he was a captain on the staff of Gen. Winfield Scott, did he have the opportunity to demonstrate the brilliance and heroism that prompted General Scott to write that Lee was “the very best soldier I ever saw in the field.”
                                Its a little weak as its all from a 2 year period, but he did spend the greatest part of his career in a peace time capacity.

                                Comment

                                Latest Topics

                                Collapse

                                Working...
                                X