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West Point speaker was the ‘tip of the spear’ into Iraq

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  • hogdriver
    replied
    Originally posted by Lance Williams
    But, with the size of our armed forces smaller this type of leader is all the more important. You can only depend on technology so much.
    True, but try to tell the politicians that, or the "analysts" and "experts". They are unable or unwilling to accept that technology is not a "miracle weapon" and cannot substitute for training, experience, unit cohesion and superior leadership.

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  • Lance Williams
    replied
    Originally posted by hogdriver
    Yep, what John Keegan calls a "heroic leader", the sort of leader seen all to rarely today.
    But, with the size of our armed forces smaller this type of leader is all the more important. You can only depend on technology so much.

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  • hogdriver
    replied
    Originally posted by GeorgiaDixie
    Colonel Marcone was also awarded the Silver Star, Bronze Star, and Purple Heart. He definitely leads from the front!
    Yep, what John Keegan calls a "heroic leader", the sort of leader seen all to rarely today.

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  • Janos
    replied
    Great article! Thanks for posting it!

    JS

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  • Scout Out
    replied
    There was more to the article than i previously thought.

    Marcone offered advice to the cadets as they prepare for commissioning as second lieutenants in less than 500 days:

    o Young leaders must study the psychology of war and learn the effects of combat on Soldiers and leaders.

    o Combat is exacting of leaders -- it requires physical fitness and a warrior ethos that leads from the front.

    o Nothing challenges you more than combat -- training has to be tough, well thought out and resourced.

    o Risk-taking must be taught, cherished and reinforced in young leaders at all levels.

    o The Army needs critically thinking, agile, adaptive and aggressive warriors as leaders.

    o Take care of Soldiers -- train them, reenlist them, challenge them.

    o Don’t wait to be told what to do –- reach out and make a difference.

    “What you are doing for your country is special and very important for the survival of our way of life,” Marcone told the cadets. “You are the future of a secure America, and in two short years, the mothers and fathers of this great nation will entrust in you their most precious resource -- our nation’s most coveted treasure -- the sons and daughters of America. Embrace it, cherish this honor, and if you are called into harm’s way, lead!”
    Thanks for the replies guys.
    Its a pleasure to share articles with all of you. As many of the friends i have in RL share 1 common thread, (Though not all).
    Left-handed Liberal Leanings of Lemmings. :bang:
    They never seem to find anything to share with me but, negative, the sky is falling, its Bush's fault, lets get angry and yell arguments face to face.
    I just get tired of the conflict and long for some level headed opinions and not emotional driven conspiracy.
    (sorry for the rant)
    time to go...

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  • Viper 10
    replied
    Re: Re: West Point speaker was the ‘tip of the spear’ into Iraq

    Originally posted by hogdriver
    Yeah, a true warrior. This would be a good "why are we there" piece as well as a good example of what we have accomplished and continue to accomplish in Iraq and elsewhere. Once again, though, the ultra-liberal media deem such stories as unfit for broadcast, because they show the true stories of our interventions overseas, stories that show our benevolent intent toward the people we have gone to assist, albeit by quite violent means. Still, combat will be waged only while it is needed. The sooner that diplomacy and rule of law may be applied, our soldiers will be thrilled to return home.
    I agree, as long as you can keep the politics of war separated from the execution of the war. Our battlefield commanders and personnel were not trained to be politicians. They are the arm that executes the decisions of our legislature and executive branches.

    When this separation does not occur and the press (and talking heads) dictate which direction the wind blows, you have Vietnam all over again...

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  • GeorgiaDixie
    replied
    Colonel Marcone was also awarded the Silver Star, Bronze Star, and Purple Heart. He definitely leads from the front!

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  • hogdriver
    replied
    Re: West Point speaker was the ‘tip of the spear’ into Iraq

    Originally posted by Scout Out
    I have read of many Great Captains in history.
    Lt. Col. Rock Marcone, is a Great Captain.



    :thumb: :thumb: :thumb:
    Yeah, a true warrior. This would be a good "why are we there" piece as well as a good example of what we have accomplished and continue to accomplish in Iraq and elsewhere. Once again, though, the ultra-liberal media deem such stories as unfit for broadcast, because they show the true stories of our interventions overseas, stories that show our benevolent intent toward the people we have gone to assist, albeit by quite violent means. Still, combat will be waged only while it is needed. The sooner that diplomacy and rule of law may be applied, our soldiers will be thrilled to return home.

    Leave a comment:


  • Viper 10
    replied
    Absolutely great advice that should apply in life. Thanks for sharing it.

    Brad

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  • West Point speaker was the ‘tip of the spear’ into Iraq

    I have read of many Great Captains in history.
    Lt. Col. Rock Marcone, is a Great Captain.

    WASHINGTON (Army News Service, Feb. 24, 2004) -- When the U.S. Military Academy asks somebody to speak to cadets at a formal function, it is normally a well-known retired or active-duty general officer. But a relatively unknown lieutenant colonel was the guest speaker to the USMA class of 2005 at the end of January.

    Lt. Col. Rock Marcone shared tales of hardship and bravery of his Soldiers as they lead the 3rd Infantry Division attack into Iraq last spring as the junior class at West Point marked the passing of the 500-days-to-graduation mark with a formal dinner, guest remarks and a dance.

    A West Point graduate with the class of 1985, Marcone commanded Task Force 3-69 Armor during major hostilities in Iraq. Composed of two armor companies, two infantry companies, two engineer companies, a headquarters and headquarters company, a field artillery battalion in direct support and an attack helicopter company in direct support, TF 3-69 had more than 1,800 men at its peak.

    Between March 23 and April 4, 2003, the task force drove 350 miles, fought seven major battles and destroyed six Iraq brigades, Marcone said. Two of those battles required deliberate river crossings involving rubber boat assaults, he said.

    While 3-69 Soldiers garnered a bevy of medals for their heroic deeds during the advance into Baghdad, the unit lost two killed in action.

    “If you take nothing else away from what I have to say to you here tonight, always remember that Soldiers follow you because they trust you and you have demonstrated a genuine concern for their welfare,” Marcone said. “With that in mind, the toughest part of being an officer, a leader, and a warrior during combat is your ability to deal with and overcome the loss of Soldiers and subordinate leaders. If you have done your job correctly, you have trained the next Soldier in line to step up and take charge.”
    :thumb: :thumb: :thumb:
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