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  • 111 US Soldiers Killed in April

    Attack on Market and a Roadside Bombing Kill 28 Iraqis
    By John F. Burns
    The New York Times

    Saturday 24 April 2004

    BAGHDAD, Iraq - At least 14 Iraqis were killed Saturday when mortar bombs or rockets were fired into a crowded chicken market in Sadr City, the district on Baghdad's outskirts that is a stronghold of the rebel cleric Moktada al-Sadr, Iraqi police officers and hospital officials said.

    Violence also increased across much of Iraq. A roadside bomb in Iskandariya, 30 miles south of Baghdad, killed 14 Iraqis traveling to the capital on a bus, a doctor at a local hospital said.

    At least nine American soldiers and sailors were killed in three separate insurgent attacks, and a marine died of wounds suffered 10 days ago. The deaths brought the total number of American soldiers killed so far in April to 111.

    In the latest attack on American forces, suicide bombers mounted waterborne attacks in the south on the oil terminal at Basra, Reuters reported. Two American sailors died and several were wounded, according to the United States Navy.

    The was no damage to the terminal, but oil production was immediately suspended. On Thursday, coordinated car bombings killed 74 people in Basra.

    At Tikrit, Saddam Hussein's hometown 110 miles north of Baghdad, a suicide car bomber who detonated his vehicle near an American military base in the center of the city was reported to have killed at least four Iraqi policemen, and to have wounded 16 other Iraqis caught near shops that were torn apart by the blast.

    In Falluja, the insurgent stronghold 30 miles west of Baghdad, relatives said a 2-year-old had been killed and six people had been wounded when one of three shells fired into a residential neighborhood hit a residence. Over Friday night, Marines killed about 30 Iraqi insurgents in a firefight outside Falluja, Col. John Coleman told Reuters.

    Seven G.I.'s were killed in earlier incidents.

    Despite the large number of deaths on Saturday, Brig. Gen. Mark Kimmitt, a spokesman for the American military command, said overall violence did not appear to be rising to the high levels of the first two weeks in April.

    In Sadr City, a center of festering unrest in Baghdad, the market attack appeared to heighten anti-American feelings. American troops responding to the attack were met with shouts of abuse from angry crowds, some of whom accused American helicopters of firing missiles at the market. General Kimmitt said occupation forces were "certainly not" responsible.

    Anything that stirs the volatile mood in Sadr City is a major concern for American commanders as they consider a new Marine offensive in Falluja. Though the target of a new Falluja offensive would be Sunni Muslim insurgents, Shiite clerics with mass followings in Sadr City have proclaimed support for the Falluja fighters.

    The American military command said it had no information about who fired the projectiles, which General Kimmitt said appeared to have been aimed at a nearby base for American soldiers but which fell close to rows of crowded market stalls.

    Furious residents held up bloodied human remains to television cameras; others shouted angrily about President Bush, the United States and Israel, and Americans and Jews. The dead included two young girls, and hospital press officers said at least three of those wounded had undergone leg amputations.

    General Kimmit said the mortar was the second violent incident in Sadr City in the last day. On Friday night, he said, a military convoy was ambushed there by men firing rocket-propelled grenades. Several soldiers were wounded, he said.

    In the worst of the attacks on American troops, five soldiers were killed and six wounded in a rocket attack on the sprawling military base in Taji, about 10 miles beyond the northwestern outskirts of Baghdad and a 30-minute drive from Falluja. It has been used as a base for some of the American military operations in Falluja.

    In Kut, a predominantly Shiite city 100 miles southeast of Baghdad, the police chief said two more American troops had been killed when a rocket-propelled grenade was fired at a convoy 25 miles south of the city.

    A statement issued earlier in the day by the Marine Corps announced the death of a marine who had suffered combat injuries 10 days ago in the fighting in Anbar Province, which includes Falluja.

    [The Pentagon announced Saturday that the remains of an American Army reservist missing in Iraq since an April 9 attack were recovered on Friday, Agence France-Presse reported. The reservist, Sgt. Elmer C. Krause, 40, of Greensboro, N.C., was part of a convoy that was attacked with rocket-propelled grenades and small arms fire west of Baghdad.

    [Another American soldier, Pfc. Keith Matthew Maupin, 20, listed as missing in the same incident, was reclassified by the Pentagon on Friday as captured, making him the first soldier to be officially taken hostage since the war in Iraq began, and the second American being held by insurgents. Thomas Hamill, 43, a civilian employee of the contractor Kellogg Brown and Root, was taken hostage after the same attack, in which six other civilian employees of the company went missing.]

    As coffins bearing the dead were carried out of the main Sadr City hospital, relatives wept. One woman directed her grief at President Bush and the American occupation. "This Bush, we don't want him," she told Reuters. "It wasn't like this under Saddam Hussein."

    In the attack at the Taji military base, an American military spokesman said insurgents fired two rockets into the camp from the back of a truck at 5:30 a.m., striking an area of prefabricated housing units of a kind used at American bases across Iraq. Taji, one of the largest military bases in the country under Mr. Hussein, is used both as a base for American units, currently the First Cavalry Division, and as a center for training the new Iraqi Army. It has been a frequent target of insurgent strikes.

    In Basra, the main city in southern Iraq, the police arrested three men as suspects in the multiple car bombings on Thursday and paraded them blindfolded before television cameras. A senior officer in the police intelligence unit, Jasim Darraji, said the men had been seized with a truck carrying more than three tons of explosives, mainly artillery shells, hidden under a cargo of sheep dung. Officials in the city revised the casualty toll in the bombings upward, to 74 dead and 160 wounded.

    Britain announced Saturday that Edward Chaplin, a senior diplomat, would become ambassador to the new Iraqi government on July 1.
    I hate it when I see one of those road signs that says "Draw Bridge Ahead" and I don't have a pencil.
    -Lou Chiafullo

  • #2
    http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

    Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

    Comment


    • #3
      Geeky Nerd's post

      While he has made some interesting posts, in this one, from a NY Times reporter's (John F. Burns) story, "Attack on a Market and a Roadside Bombing Kill 28 Iraqis", when the reporter's story ends, Geeky Nerd's story continues. Aside from two bracketed paragraphs, which we may take to mean that they are not a part of the story, the below paragraphs do not so indicate:

      As coffins bearing the dead were carried out of the main Sadr City hospital, relatives wept. One woman directed her grief at President Bush and the American occupation. "This Bush, we don't want him," she told Reuters. "It wasn't like this under Saddam Hussein." In the attack at the Taji military base, an American military spokesman said insurgents fired two rockets into the camp from the back of a truck at 5:30 a.m., striking an area of prefabricated housing units of a kind used at American bases across Iraq. Taji, one of the largest military bases in the country under Mr. Hussein, is used both as a base for American units, currently the First Cavalry Division, and as a center for training the new Iraqi Army. It has been a frequent target of insurgent strikes. In Basra, the main city in southern Iraq, the police arrested three men as suspects in the multiple car bombings on Thursday and paraded them blindfolded before television cameras. A senior officer in the police intelligence unit, Jasim Darraji, said the men had been seized with a truck carrying more than three tons of explosives, mainly artillery shells, hidden under a cargo of sheep dung. Officials in the city revised the casualty toll in the bombings upward, to 74 dead and 160 wounded. Britain announced Saturday that Edward Chaplin, a senior diplomat, would become ambassador to the new Iraqi government on July 1.

      It would be rational to assume that these paragraphs are a part of the article, though a check of the Times' website dismisses that. Perhaps it is Geeky Nerd's opinion, though one would wonder why he did not so indicate. Perhaps only his future posts will shed further light on this one.
      Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
      (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

      Comment


      • #4
        So... what say you, Geeky Nerd? Surely you didn't doctor the story...?
        Rumors of my demise have been greatly exaggerated... again...

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        • #5
          Ooops..my mistake, Its part of another story that I inadvertently included in the posting. My apologies guys.
          I hate it when I see one of those road signs that says "Draw Bridge Ahead" and I don't have a pencil.
          -Lou Chiafullo

          Comment


          • #6
            Hey Geeky.....While you've been

            Searching for these articles that make the Bush presidency look bad......and while you've been searching for these articles that only talk about how are guys and girls are dying......and how we're creating more terrorism......etc...etc...etc...

            Have you run across any articles that tell of all the good that has been done because of the U.S. intervention? Have you run across any articles that say our troops are doing fine, that their morale is as high as ever?

            Gee, one would think by all the posts you put up....that you're working for Kerry or Kennedy or ABC, NBC, CBS, or CNN.

            Also.....from the few that I've read.....you post these articles, but don't post your actual opinions. Is there a reason?

            OH and one last thing......yes, we're losing troops.....it happens in war. We keep telling the terrorists to stop.....and either they don't understand english or they are......oh crap....terrorists.....and terrorists kill for no reason other than to put fear into their target group...which is the people they want to control IF they succeed in making us leave.

            dog

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            • #7
              How about you posting the feel-good articles that you want here posted if you wish to counteract my postings.

              My posts certainly have not broken the forum rules and you always have the freedom not to read the articles I posted if you get easily affected.


              Your rant about terrorists in Iraq is very debatable and I would like to state that those insurgents fighting the US troops weren't terrorists before the US invaded Iraq. Not one Iraqi even was a member of the 9/11 terrorists. The terrorists are in Afghanistan. The insurgents are in Iraq.
              I hate it when I see one of those road signs that says "Draw Bridge Ahead" and I don't have a pencil.
              -Lou Chiafullo

              Comment


              • #8
                Hmmmm Perhaps I will try to start doing just that!

                Posting the good things about what we've done.

                My posts certainly have not broken the forum rules and you always has the freedom not to read the articles I posted if you get easily affected.
                You're right, they haven't broken any forum rules, and you have every right in the world to you opinion.... but as long as you post them, I certainly have the right to mine. I'm not easily affected....I've been listening to drivel like this since we entered Iraq. It is starting to wear a little thin.

                Your rant about terrorists in Iraq is very debatable and I would like to state that those insurgents fighting the US troops weren't terrorists before the US invaded Iraq. Not one Iraqi even was a member of the 9/11 terrorists. The terrorists are in Afghanistan. The insurgents are in Iraq.
                Now you want to play semantics. Terrorists/Insurgents....you say potâtoe, I say potatoe....you say tomâtoe, I say tomato. These "insurgents" as you call them are not only taking the lives of Coalition troops.....but the lives of innocents....and not by accident....on purpose.....this makes them terrorists in any normal persons view.

                We both have a right to our opinions......so I will continue to use that right as long as I see fit. I served my country for 13 years and I've earned that right......not just had it "given" to me. Don't get me wrong....I'm not saying that you haven't served or whatever....just stating that I have.

                dog

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                • #9
                  To appease moondog I'm posting below a feel-good email from a medic in the Iowa Army National Guard, serving in Iraq:


                  As I head off to Baghdad for the final weeks of my stay in Iraq, I wanted to say thanks to all of you who did not believe the media. They have done a very poor job of covering everything that has happened. I am sorry
                  that I have not been able to visit all of you during my two week leave back home. And just so you can rest at night knowing something is happening in Iraq that is noteworthy, I thought I would pass this on to you. This is the
                  list of things that has happened in Iraq recently: (Please share it with your friends and compare it to the version that your paper is producing.)

                  >* Over 400,000 kids have up-to-date immunizations.
                  >* School attendance is up 80% from levels before the war.
                  >* Over 1,500 schools have been renovated and rid of the weapons stored there so education can occur.
                  >* The port of Uhm Qasar was renovated so grain can be off-loaded from ships faster.
                  >* The country had its first 2 billion barrel export of oil in August.
                  >* Over 4.5 million people have clean drinking water for the first time ever in Iraq.
                  >* The country now receives 2 times the electrical power it did before the war.
                  >* 100% of the hospitals are open and fully staffed, compared to 35% before the war.
                  >* Elections are taking place in every major city, and city councils are in place.
                  >* Sewer and water lines are installed in every major city.
                  >* Over 60,000 police are patrolling the streets.
                  >* Over 100,000 Iraqi civil defense police are securing the country.
                  >* Over 80,000 Iraqi soldiers are patrolling the streets side by side with US soldiers.
                  >* Over 400,000 people have telephones for the first time ever.
                  >* Students are taught field sanitation and hand washing techniques to prevent the spread of germs.
                  >* An interim constitution has been signed.
                  >* Girls are allowed to attend school.
                  >* Textbooks that don't mention Saddam are in the schools for the first time in 30 years.

                  Don't believe for one second that these people do not want us there. I have met many, many people from Iraq that want us there, and in a bad way. They say they will never see the freedoms we talk about but they hope their
                  children will. We are doing a good job in Iraq and I challenge anyone, anywhere to dispute me on these facts. So If you happen to run into John Kerry, be sure to give him my email address and send him to Denison, Iowa.
                  This soldier will set him straight. If you are like me and very disgusted with how this period of rebuilding has been portrayed, email this to a friend and let them know there are good things happening.

                  Ray Reynolds, SFC
                  Iowa Army National Guard
                  234th Signal Battalion

                  --------------------
                  Its pretty comprehensive. :thumb:
                  I hate it when I see one of those road signs that says "Draw Bridge Ahead" and I don't have a pencil.
                  -Lou Chiafullo

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    GN.....thanks for posting that!!!

                    Hey Look Everybody, I thanked GN and didn't bash him.....make note of this.

                    The real question now GN is do you believe this or not? If so, then why keep throwing out all those other posts about our guys dying as if it's because we're doing something wrong or our government is?

                    And if you don't believe it, then why bother to appease me? I'm not really anybody important...I'm just a nut who doesn't like some of the things you've posted.

                    but in any case, thanks for posting that.

                    dog

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