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Hotshot sniper in one-and-a-half mile double kill

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  • Hotshot sniper in one-and-a-half mile double kill

    A BRITISH Army sniper has set a new sharpshooting distance record by killing two Taliban machinegunners in Afghanistan from more than 1 miles away.
    Craig Harrison, a member of the Household Cavalry, killed the insurgents with consecutive shots even though they were 3,000ft beyond the most effective range of his rifle
    Hotshot sniper in one-and-a-half mile double kill - Times Online
    Never Fear the Event

    Admiral Lord Nelson

  • #2
    I'm glad to see the NATO forces taking to heart my philosophy of the only good terrorist being a dead terrorist.

    The man is an unusually gifted marksman. If he had taken down one some may have said, "lucky shot", but taking down 2 with consecutive makes it proof that it was skill, not luck.

    I bet those Talibany terrorists when they met St. Peter at the Pearly Gates looked at each other and said, "Where are we and how did we get here?"
    "If you are right, then you are right even if everyone says you are wrong. If you are wrong then you are wrong even if everyone says you are right." William Penn.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by trailboss49 View Post
      I bet those Talibany terrorists when they met St. Peter at the Pearly Gates looked at each other and said, "Where are we and how did we get here?"
      Don't tell me St Peter is one of the 70 virgins?
      They must be very disapointed!


      Amazing shot though.

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      • #4
        Score Two for the good guys. Nicely Done Brits

        But guys, read more. The man who did this has is an incredible story. He was wounded in an IED explosion on his first tour which broke both of his arms. He went through rehab, then insisted upon going back to the fight and made these shots on his second tour after his recovery. This guy is really something! The Brits really have someone to be proud of here! As do the rest of us.

        Last edited by Miss Saigon; 02 May 10, 09:47.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by trailboss49 View Post
          The man is an unusually gifted marksman. If he had taken down one some may have said, "lucky shot", but taking down 2 with consecutive makes it proof that it was skill, not luck.
          More than just two shots. His third shot intentionally disabled the MG the two Taliban were trying to serve.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Herman Hum View Post
            More than just two shots. His third shot intentionally disabled the MG the two Taliban were trying to serve.
            That is a man that knows his stuff.
            Matthew 5:9 Blessed are the cheesemakers

            That's right bitches. I'm blessed!

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            • #7
              Kudos to the eagle eyed Brit!Thank God your on our side!
              ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

              BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

              BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

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              • #8
                One hell of a shot, one hell of a soldier . Even if he is a limey
                "The first time those bastards encounter US Marines, I want it to be the most traumatic experience of their miserable lives."
                -Gen. James Mattis, USMC

                Psalms 144.1

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                • #9
                  That is a fantastic shot, beyond the design capacity of the L115A3 rifle system, such a distance would have required the shooter to aim a few meters above his target ( the Schmidt & Bender 5-25x56 PM II LP telescopic scope maximum elevation of 93 MOA is not designed for that range) unless the regular scope base had been replaced for shooting over 2.000M.


                  Afghanistan has all the components for long distance shot record breaking:

                  - high altitude/low barometric pressure= reduce bullet drag and improves range of ammunition.
                  - cool weather= improves range of ammunition, reduces risks of ground mirage.
                  - clear air= good visibility at long range allow scope to be used to maximum efficiency.
                  - Plenty of targets.

                  At 2475M, the bullets had a travel time of over 5 seconds, the lateral deviation due to the rifling of the barrel (spin drift+ coriolis effect) was 3M (2.3+0.7).
                  The bullets were subsonic on arrival, (the ballistic at such extended ranges is similar to that of artillery rounds) and coming to the targets at a downward angle of around 25.


                  kelt
                  Last edited by kelt06; 04 May 10, 17:53. Reason: added picture

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kelt06 View Post
                    At 2475M, the bullets had a travel time of over 5 seconds, the lateral deviation due to the rifling of the barrel (spin drift+ coriolis effect) was 3M (2.3+0.7).
                    The bullets were subsonic on arrival, (the ballistic at such extended ranges is similar to that of artillery rounds) and coming to the targets at a downward angle of around 25.
                    Kelt,
                    Do you know what did they use to measure distance?
                    With such ballistics, it would be necessary to measure at 0,1 meter precision.

                    Also, since coriolis effect is influenced by azimuth, do you know azimuth they used?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by vathra View Post
                      Kelt,
                      Do you know what did they use to measure distance?
                      With such ballistics, it would be necessary to measure at 0,1 meter precision.

                      Also, since coriolis effect is influenced by azimuth, do you know azimuth they used?
                      I don't know what is the equipment in use with the British snipers, I would think that their rangefinders are accurate to the meter depending on the size of the target.

                      The French Army heavy rifle snipers (hecate II) use the same equipment as the forward observers, the TM17 or TM 18, it is a bulky long distance binocular observation system including a laser range finder, GPS and electronic compass.

                      I don't know the details of the shot, but for the shooter to have hit the target twice at such distance, all components of the shots including the coriolis effect that could vary from nil to 0.3M had to be included in the calculation for the scope settings.

                      kelt

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                      • #12
                        I'm sure he's a wonderful sniper, but these were very lucky shots and I'm suspicious of them. The round would have gone subsonic several hundred meters prior to arriving at the target making it's trajectory unpredictable at best. That alone would be enought to make these shots ones of luck as much as skill and it doesn't even take into account the changing environmental conditions down range or even variations in individual rounds or ammunition which alone would be more than enough to cause a miss at the ranges we're talking about.

                        It could be done, but if it happened the way they claim it did it has as much to do with chance as anything else.

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                        • #13
                          One shot two kills

                          I don't know what should be considered more amazing, the range, the double kill or the fact that he made it in the first shot.

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                          • #14
                            I'm also sceptical. They said that the distance was measured with a GPS. I take it to mean that someone traveled from his location to the location of the MG. Most GPS systems have an altimeter. If theirs did, it would keep adding the elevation changes as they went. Everyone knows that A-stan isn't flat. Bullet drop due to range is entirely dependent on horizontal distance and nothing else.
                            As an example. I could walk from one mountaintop to another via the valley in between. Depending on the slope, I could walk 500m down and then 500m up. The GPS would show that I walked 1000m. Yet, the straight line distance between the two peaks might only be 600m.
                            Besides, he was just a ceremonial horse soldier, not even infantry!

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                            • #15
                              Its amazing, but feasible and on the limits of the rifle/cartridge capacity and only in such a favorable environnement as Afghanistan.

                              Running a ballistic calculator (altitude 2000M temperature 5C) with the lapua Scenar 250gr bullet used by the British, with a V0 of 930M/s, the bullet is supersonic up to 2200M, velocity at 2475M is 306M/s with 752 joules of energy, the bullet time of travel is 5.06seconds, and its vertical drop 90M.

                              In order to get a 1st shot on target, the sniper needed to know accurately the distance, the differencial altitude shooter/target, the heading of the shot, a perfect assessement of the wind.
                              The spotter operating the laser range finder had to get the distance accurately to the meter, and in this instance since the Talibans were posted inside a compound that was feasible by taking several readings on building/walls around the Talibans.

                              Reading the news reports, the two shots on the MG crew occured during a firefight, then the sniper had the opportunity to do one or several test shots unnoticed of its target, a large building or wall would have been perfect to verify how much off target his calculation put the shot and readjust accordingly to shot the Talibans manning the MG.

                              I don not know the ranging gear used by the British snipers, but it must be similar in quality to the stuff used by the French heavy sniper teams.
                              The French spotters use either a Vector (5000M) or a TM17 or 18 (30.000M), a bulky binocular observation setup that include a laser rangefinder, a clinometer, a GPS, and a compass, the set can give accurately the coordinates of the target by computing it from the target distance, angle and heading readout.
                              The setup is mainly used for forward air support or artillery spotting.

                              kelt
                              Last edited by kelt06; 05 May 10, 18:18.

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