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  • Tribal Areas of Pakistan

    Taliban and AQ continue to establish a defacto state in the tribal areas of Pakistan.

    http://www.longwarjournal.org/archiv...ing_taliba.php

    The Taliban takeover of the Northwest Frontier Province continues virtually unopposed. In North Waziristan, the Pakistani government is suing for peace after five days of fighting that resulted in at least 50 soldiers killed; unofficial estimates are over 100). In South Waziristan, the Taliban are showing off a captured military base, parading captured soldiers in front of the media, and bragging about beheadings. In the settled district of Swat, the local Taliban are conducting public floggings while the bomb religious statues. In Mohmand, the Taliban are conducting public beheadings.
    “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
    “To talk of many things:
    Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
    Of cabbages—and kings—
    And why the sea is boiling hot—
    And whether pigs have wings.”
    ― Lewis Carroll

  • #2
    Originally posted by Combatengineer View Post
    Taliban and AQ continue to establish a defacto state in the tribal areas of Pakistan.

    http://www.longwarjournal.org/archiv...ing_taliba.php
    And Pakistan doesn't want US troops to go in there and root em out because they don't want to anger the more conservative elements of society (and we don't want to do it without Pakistan's approval for a number of obvious reasons).

    You know, I really do fear what would happen if Pakistan fell to a Taliban-like government. It's not a very good government now (), but Taliban 2.0 would be worse by far.

    I bet we could send in a few guys without anyone knowing. . .

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    • #3
      Originally posted by daemonofdecay View Post
      And Pakistan doesn't want US troops to go in there and root em out because they don't want to anger the more conservative elements of society (and we don't want to do it without Pakistan's approval for a number of obvious reasons).

      You know, I really do fear what would happen if Pakistan fell to a Taliban-like government. It's not a very good government now (), but Taliban 2.0 would be worse by far.

      I bet we could send in a few guys without anyone knowing. . .
      No, we'd just let India go in and liquidate them with a few atomic bombs. It is unlikely that the nuclear exchange between them would put enough radiation in the atmosphere to harm us over here.
      "If you are right, then you are right even if everyone says you are wrong. If you are wrong then you are wrong even if everyone says you are right." William Penn.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by trailboss49 View Post
        No, we'd just let India go in and liquidate them with a few atomic bombs. It is unlikely that the nuclear exchange between them would put enough radiation in the atmosphere to harm us over here.
        But what would happen to our tech-support!?



        Curry would never be the same again. . .

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        • #5
          Originally posted by daemonofdecay View Post
          But what would happen to our tech-support!?



          Curry would never be the same again. . .
          The same thing that has happened to our computer tech support. We'd lease it out to India.
          "If you are right, then you are right even if everyone says you are wrong. If you are wrong then you are wrong even if everyone says you are right." William Penn.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by trailboss49 View Post
            No, we'd just let India go in and liquidate them with a few atomic bombs. It is unlikely that the nuclear exchange between them would put enough radiation in the atmosphere to harm us over here.
            I don't think India is up for it (how embarrassing to be the only country to have ever had a combat aircraft surrender in mid-air in mid-combat).

            Their weapons are uranium-based and fairly low yield >1 kt, so you're right it wouldn't bother anyone outside of Pakistan/India.

            Maybe the Taliban will name their new capital Clintonabad in honor of their founder and mentor.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Mircea View Post
              Maybe the Taliban will name their new capital Clintonabad in honor of their founder and mentor.
              I was never a fan of the former Chubby-Chaser of 1600, but how exactly was Clinton responsible for the Taliban? That's a new one on me. I've always thought that the Taliban were the creation of Pakistan's ISI, and they were mighty pissed at Clinton when he hit them with an embargo back in the 1990's.
              I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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              • #8
                interesting article.

                and now watch Pakistan implode!

                iran must be so happy. 10 years ago, they had enemies on every one of their borders, now they are all destroyed or neutralized. perhaps god IS on their side. but of course we know better.
                "Freedom cannot exist without discipline, self-discipline, and rights cannot exist without duties. Those who do not observe their duties do not deserve their rights."--Oriana Fallaci

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mircea View Post
                  I don't think India is up for it (how embarrassing to be the only country to have ever had a combat aircraft surrender in mid-air in mid-combat).

                  Their weapons are uranium-based and fairly low yield >1 kt, so you're right it wouldn't bother anyone outside of Pakistan/India.

                  Maybe the Taliban will name their new capital Clintonabad in honor of their founder and mentor.
                  Info on India's Nukes:

                  http://www.fas.org/nuke/guide/india/nuke/
                  “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
                  “To talk of many things:
                  Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
                  Of cabbages—and kings—
                  And why the sea is boiling hot—
                  And whether pigs have wings.”
                  ― Lewis Carroll

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by piero1971 View Post
                    interesting article.

                    and now watch Pakistan implode!

                    iran must be so happy. 10 years ago, they had enemies on every one of their borders, now they are all destroyed or neutralized. perhaps god IS on their side. but of course we know better.
                    You are mistakened on both counts.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Iran is not as happy as some might think . . .

                      They have instability and US forces on two borders. The Syrians are making nice with Turkey. Russia is using the incomplete reactor they continue to drag their feet on as a bargaining chip with the US. The Arabs are buying all the weapons they can afford and Israel is now facing only a deeply divided PNA.

                      The Iranians may not be ready to fold yet but I doubt they really like the hand they are playing. Their strongest position was probably right after the 2006 elections while the Administration had no clue what the Democrat controlled Congress would do. Now that the Dem's have proven unable to get their act together, Bush has at least another 15 months to increase the political and economic pain in Iran. He doesn't need bombs to make life less pleasant for the Imams in Tehran.

                      And the next US president won't owe the Iranians a darn thing.
                      Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

                      Questions about our site? See the FAQ.

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                      • #12
                        Another excellant post on Northwest Pakistan on The Longwar Journal;

                        http://www.longwarjournal.org/archiv...e_in_pakis.php

                        This link is a summary of the longer article at:

                        http://pajamasmedia.com/2007/10/crun...n_pakistan.php

                        Some highlights:

                        The attack on Bhutto’s procession, which occurred less than 24 hours after she returned to Pakistan, was a coordinated, sophisticated strike consisting of a car bomb, a suicide bomber, a grenade attack, and a sniper team. The attack was carried out by al Qaeda, Taliban, and their Pakistani allies, very likely with help inside the Inter Service Agency, Pakistan’s infamous intelligence service; the military is a possible participant. It resulted in the largest terror toll in the country’s history, with over 136 killed and upwards of 500 wounded.
                        The Taliban conducted a series of suicide bombings and conventional attacks against civilian and military targets during the winter, spring, and summer of 2007. Hundreds of police and soldiers were killed along with hundreds more civilians. During this time, the Taliban and al Qaeda attempted to assassinate President Musharraf in Rawalpindi, Prime Minister Aziz in Islamabad, and Interior Minister Sherpao in the Northwest Frontier Province, while soldiers were butchered in their barracks and savaged on the streets.
                        “Thus far, American policy toward Pakistan has amounted to unconditional support for Musharraf, coupled with occasional air strikes against high-level al Qaeda targets in the tribal areas,” writes Daveed Gartenstein-Ross, who looks at the policy options for Pakistan. In interviews with national security experts, Gartenstein-Ross notes the suggested way forward in dealing with Pakistan includes incentives tied to the killing or capture of senior al Qaeda leaders, pinprick strikes using special forces, an air campaign, “a campaign of assassins,” or an Anbar Salvation Front model to recruit tribal leaders on the side of the government were proposed. Alone, these solutions will not work.
                        The problem is that most of these options, other than an Anbar-like tribal engagement, have been tried. And the US has had such success in Anbar because it maintained a permanent, beefed-up military presence in the region to ensure the locals willing to back the US against al Qaeda in Iraq could rely on reinforcements, logistical, financial, and other support.
                        The past six years have shown that half measures only embolden al Qaeda. The US can conduct pinpoint raids and airstrikes as much it likes, but the problem will not go away until the enemy is uprooted. Anything short of a full-scale counterinsurgency campaign will allow the Taliban and al Qaeda to retain their safe havens and terror camps, their breeding grounds for attacks against democracy. The major terror attacks in Madrid, London, Mumbai, as well as foiled plots in Denmark and the London Airline strike have all been traced back to Waziristan. Future attacks are being plotted there while Pakistan and the West sleeps.
                        “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
                        “To talk of many things:
                        Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
                        Of cabbages—and kings—
                        And why the sea is boiling hot—
                        And whether pigs have wings.”
                        ― Lewis Carroll

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