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  • #91
    Putin to Shut RIA in Overhaul of Russian State News Coverage

    President Vladimir Putin tightened his grip on Russia’s news media by abolishing the RIA Novosti wire service and handing control of its successor to a controversial television anchor.

    Putin decreed that Dmitry Kiselyov, known for his outspoken views about homosexuals and Ukraine’s ongoing street protests, will head the new agency, called Russia Today, according to a document published on the Kremlin’s website today.
    http://www.bloomberg.com/



    Putin's RIA Novosti Revamp Prompts Propaganda Fears

    President Vladimir Putin's plans to create a major international news agency called Rossiya Segodnya, or Russia Today, is being seen as a significant move in Moscow's strategy to influence world opinion. But it has also raised concerns about further curbs on media freedom in Russia itself.

    The new agency is to be headed by Dmitry Kiselev, one of Russian TV's most notorious anchors, known for his extreme anti-Western and homophobic views.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/

    Comment


    • #92
      A more or less sane decision. Ria for example had starting to get out of line with the view of the Russian state. Why should they pay for something that isn´t working for them?

      All this fears of "propaganda" is nonsense. The state already owned it and could more or less have whatever they wanted printed. They are basicly just making it more cost efficient. Ria was after all mostly doing the same thing as Itar Tass.

      Further, RIA was more aimed at a foreign audience. Just like VoR and a few others. Ria was also suffering from severe bureaucratic clotting
      “For there is nothing more serious than a lunatic when he comes to the central point of his lunacy.”

      Max Sterner

      Comment


      • #93
        Erik,

        Understand about the reorganization, but what do you make of this in terms of what Putin is trying to accomplish?

        The new agency is to be headed by Dmitry Kiselev, one of Russian TV's most notorious anchors, known for his extreme anti-Western and homophobic views.
        Bob

        Comment


        • #94
          Originally posted by PitchRate View Post
          Erik,

          Understand about the reorganization, but what do you make of this in terms of what Putin is trying to accomplish?

          Bob
          I am not familiar with that man, but it looks like they are exaggerating his views. This for example, isn´t really so controversial elsewhere.
          “For there is nothing more serious than a lunatic when he comes to the central point of his lunacy.”

          Max Sterner

          Comment


          • #95
            Originally posted by Erkki View Post
            I am not familiar with that man, but it looks like they are exaggerating his views. This for example, isn´t really so controversial elsewhere.
            Yes. As I search for info on Dmitry Kiselev I get mostly items dealing with his views on gay issues. There is very little on what was termed his “extreme anti-Western views”.

            Comment


            • #96
              Originally posted by PitchRate View Post
              Yes. As I search for info on Dmitry Kiselev I get mostly items dealing with his views on gay issues. There is very little on what was termed his “extreme anti-Western views”.
              Here is a google translated version of the Russian wikipedia on him, it´s more detailed than the rather short English page.

              http://translate.google.se/translate...25B8%25D1%2587
              “For there is nothing more serious than a lunatic when he comes to the central point of his lunacy.”

              Max Sterner

              Comment


              • #97
                Erik - thanks for the information.

                Comment


                • #98
                  The Riddle Of Marketing In Russia

                  The Riddle Of Marketing In Russia


                  This post was co-authored with Evgenia Barkanova, Irina Kudryashova, and Irina Melnik, all MBA students at the Fuqua School of Business, Duke University.


                  Winston Churchill said, “Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.” This becomes clear when thinking about U.S. companies marketing in Russia (more properly called the Russian Federation). Results from the last CMO Survey indicate that Russia is the international market with the highest sales growth rate. Sales are reported to have grown an average of 57% for U.S. companies that designate Russia as their largest international market. This compares with India at 38%, China at 26%, and Brazil with 19% growth.


                  Where is the enigma inside the Russian marketing mystery? Consider these facts. Russia is the world’s 6th largest economy. A member of G8 and G20, identified among the BRIC economies, and a recent entrant to the WTO, Russia is an emerging economic powerhouse. Strong earnings from the oil/natural gas industry have grown the overall economy and allowed the country to diversify its economy while retaining an above average GDP growth rate of 4.1 % from 2010-2012, according to the World Bank (compared to 2.4% for the USA). Even with these impressive credentials, Russia remains a difficult market for many foreign companies for a variety of reasons. What should U.S. marketers know about this Russian riddle? We collected the following case studies involving non-Russian and Russian companies as well as several interesting facts to offer these insights.
                  Forbes
                  “For there is nothing more serious than a lunatic when he comes to the central point of his lunacy.”

                  Max Sterner

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Good Stuff!

                    Originally posted by Erkki View Post
                    Still rather glad grandpa and maternal Great grandpa pulled out of the tsars Empire- but love to go back for a visit soon!
                    The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

                    Comment


                    • Here are some interesting quotes from the rest of the article:

                      The Olympic experience may serve as a metaphor for doing business in Russia … full of opportunities, but one is wise to prepare for more than the usual amount of the unexpected.
                      However, there are 27 other official languages and more than a hundred other languages without official recognition. Our research shows that most marketing activities in Russia ignore these ethnic differences.
                      Russians are attracted to foreign products, believing them to be higher quality. Italy means fashion, Germany represents reliability, and France stands for romance. Yet many Russians also suspect foreigners of dumping inferior goods into Russia. Local goods, especially foods and beverages, are often preferred by Russians, given their belief that these Russian products are more authentic and given their loyalty to Russian companies. At the same time, they often doubt the quality of these same domestic brands. These conflicting perspectives put Russian customers, and those companies marketing to them, in a complex situation.
                      Russians have an intense pride in their country and culture. Although they may happily criticize it themselves, they tend not to appreciate others doing so. “Russians are more likely to be cautious and conservative defenders of the status quo. Americans, as a nation of risk-takers, can have their patience tested by Russian caution, and anticipation of the negative.
                      Russia’s lack of such strong institutions allows corruption or capriciousness to often trump competition. Weak institutions also lead to consumers not trusting companies or markets, which makes developing strong relationships with customers particularly challenging.

                      Comment


                      • Russia’s lack of such strong institutions allows corruption or capriciousness to often trump competition. Weak institutions also lead to consumers not trusting companies or markets, which makes developing strong relationships with customers particularly challenging.
                        That can be applied to the US, can it not?
                        "Ask not what your country can do for you"

                        Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

                        you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

                        Comment


                        • I have worked in Russia and have marketed a number of consumer product there having headed the Marketing and Sales function of a Russian distribution company 10 years ago.

                          Successful marketing in Russia is no different from marketing in any other country. Every country is unique, so marketeers have to take the trouble of understanding the nuances of the country and not assume that `the natives are waiting for the latest in the West to be offered to them'. (possibly the biggest mistake brands have made in Russia).

                          The points made in the article would apply to almost all so called `emerging markets'.

                          It is important for a marketeer to immerse her/himself completely in Russia. In a 3 year stint I picked up enough Russian to conduct business in, saw more cities than the average Russian, shopped in local markets and about 80% of my friends were Russian.

                          I say this only because a lot of foreign marketers in Russia simply assume that their job is to sell the same product that worked in other countries and despite a lot of local marketing talent, do not stray from the expat circuit or take the trouble listening to their local teams.
                          There are also product categories where Russian companies are world class and there is a lot that can be learn from them.

                          Comment


                          • Snowdon

                            The Whistleblower Snowdon wants to stay further in Russia. He had already reached in his petition for longing of his asylium.
                            Attached Files

                            Comment


                            • RT Anchorwoman Quits over "Lies" in Russian Media

                              Another English-speaking anchorwoman has quit her job at a Russian news network over allegation of lies in Russian media.

                              This lady used to work for Russia Today, which is managed by Putin's personal propadandist, Dmitry Kiselyov. Kiselyov is considered to be Putin's personal pet, appointed to the job by Putin himself .

                              Last edited by MonsterZero; 25 Jul 14, 02:27.

                              "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
                              --Frederick II, King of Prussia

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by MonsterZero View Post
                                Another English-speaking anchorwoman has quit her job[/URL] at a Russian news network over allegation of lies in Russian media.
                                Yes, I noticed that. I read an interesting summary of how the narrative is steered over there to carry across that country's message, but I can't find it any more, unfortunately.
                                Michele

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