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  • What is health insurance like in your country?

    For example here in America dental coverage is not included in all workplace insurance benefits. If one gets into a car accident or falls and needs physical therapy their insurance company will limit them to a number of visits...say 20 occupational therapy visits even though the accident victim will be needing more work.

    So I would like to hear from German, Canadian , Arab , Indian , English and other posters from non-American countries..For example does your country allow free dental benefits to all citizens? And I’m not talking about free elective surgery. For example does your country allow all citizens to get a root canal if they need to?

    Are there any people here from Sweden or any country with national healthcare. Please explain how your system works. I assume you folks are automatically getting a health insurance company at birth correct? And that all of your basic needs whether dental or non-dental are covered by your state healthcare system? I think that the United States trails behind the more civilized countries of the world such as Sweden when it comes to national healthcare. By the way I’m not talking about the state insurance covering plastic surgery or something that’s unnecessary.. I’m talking about basic needs whether it be medicine, surgery or physical therapy to help someone live Or to get them back to normal after a accident Which is imo merely following in line with a civilized country that follows Christian values.

    For example for folks in a country with universal healthcare ...if you get into a car accident and need physical therapy for one year does your state insurance cover the physical therapy for one year?

    In the United States one is looking at paying $1500-$3000 out of pocket for a root canal.. And if they can’t afford it they are as they say out of luck. If an American with no health insurance gets into a car accident and needs physical therapy they have to pay out-of-pocket and if they Dont have the money they are out of luck and will most likely suffer for the rest of their life.



    Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
    Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

    George S Patton

  • #2
    ———Does Sweden Have Free Public Healthcare?


    If you are wondering why healthcare costs in Sweden are so expensive, you are probably thinking of Switzerland. Healthcare in Sweden is not free, but it is also not expensive. In fact, when compared with other European countries, Swedish healthcare costs are quite reasonable.

    Visits for basic healthcare typically cost between 110 to 220 SEK (10–20 USD) depending on your county. Specialist appointments can go up to 400 SEK (40 USD). Hospital stays are about 120 SEK per day for the first ten days, and half that for anything longer. Additionally, medical care for those under 20 years of age is free.

    The Swedish government makes concessions for people who require frequent healthcare. The government sets a yearly cap for out-of-pocket fees at around 1,000 SEK (100 USD). Anything exceeding this amount is covered by the Swedish government. This also applies to prescription medication, which is capped at around 2,250 SEK (230 USD).
    What Does the Public Healthcare Cover?


    Public healthcare in Sweden covers the basic medical needs:
    • hospitalization
    • basic outpatient services
    • prescription medication
    • dental care (for those under 20 years old)
    • preventative services
    • handicapped support
    • rehabilitation services
    • home-based nurses and transport facilities for those in need———
    https://www.internations.org/go/movi...den/healthcare

    When it comes to Healthcare the United States needs to learn from Sweden. In Sweden state of the art hospital stays will cost patients about $10-$20 a day... But in the United States one could be looking at hundreds to thousands of dollars per day at a hospital. The cost of medicine is substantially lower in Sweden compared to the United States.

    Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
    Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

    George S Patton

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for asking the question! It forced me to look more into how Canada's system works, realizing that I had some assumptions and basic knowledge, but didn't really know how 'the system works'. I am now better informed

      Wkikipedia has a good explanation. To summarize:

      "Canadian Medicare provides coverage for approximately 70 percent of Canadians' healthcare needs, and the remaining 30 percent is paid for through the private sector.[6] The 30 percent typically relates to services not covered or only partially covered by Medicare, such as prescription drugs, dentistry and optometry.[6] Approximately 65 to 75 percent of Canadians have some form of supplementary health insurance related to the aforementioned reasons; many receive it through their employers or use secondary social service programs related to extended coverage for families receiving social assistance or vulnerable demographics, such as seniors, minors, and those with disabilities.[7][6]"

      Health Care is managed Provincially, but financially supplemented federally. As of Jan 1st, the Province of BC eliminated the nominal approx. $100 monthly fee (although IIRC even that was paid by most employers). The public coverage BC citizens and permanent residents get is:
      • medically required services provided by a physician enroled with MSP;
      • maternity care provided by a physician or a midwife;
      • medically required eye examinations provided by an ophthalmologist or optometrist for adults aged 19-64;
      • annual eye examinations for children aged 0-18 and seniors aged 65+;
      • diagnostic services, including x-rays, provided at approved diagnostic facilities, when ordered by a registered physician, midwife, podiatrist, dental surgeon or oral surgeon;
      • dental and oral surgery, when medically required to be performed in hospital (excluding restorative services, i.e.: fillings, caps, crowns, root canals, etc.)*;
      • orthodontic services related to severe congenital facial abnormalities.
      I imagine most Provinces are similar, and I assume that this accounts for the 70% of healthcare needs described by Wikipedia as being covered by the government.

      The remaining 30% non-essential services not covered in BC:
      • services that are deemed to be not medically required, such as cosmetic surgery;
      • dental services, except as outlined under benefits;
      • routine eye examinations for persons 19 to 64 years of age;
      • eyeglasses, hearing aids, and other equipment or appliances;
      • prescription drugs (see PharmaCare);
      • acupuncture, chiropractic, massage therapy, naturopathy, physical therapy and non-surgical podiatry services (except for MSP beneficiaries receiving supplementary benefits);
      • preventive services and screening tests not supported by evidence of medical effectiveness (for example, routine annual "complete" physical examinations, whole body CT scans, prostate specific antigen (PSA) tests);
      • services of counsellors or psychologists;
      • medical examinations, certificates or tests required for:
        • driving a motor vehicle
        • employment
        • life insurance
        • school or university
        • recreational and sporting activities
        • immigration purposes
      These services will be covered by third party insurance, typically provided through workplace insurance plans or can be purchased separately. Plans will vary, and some can be quite extensive (typically those with larger organizations or numbers of employees). I think the employer provide plans are typically covered by the employer. I don't remember ever paying a fee for the employer coverage.

      I believe a typical third party coverage to include:
      • 80% reimbursement for prescription drugs with $1,000 annual maximum
      • Optional dental care coverage includes preventive (80% reimbursement) and restorative (50% reimbursement)
      • 100% reimbursement for supplemental healthcare. 100% reimbursement for paramedical practitioner services up to maximum $300 per year, per practitioner and a combined maximum of $500 per calendar year
      • Vision care and semi-private hospital room coverage included
      • Combined $250,000 lifetime maximum for all benefits excluding dental and emergency travel medical
      For example for folks in a country with universal healthcare ...if you get into a car accident and need physical therapy for one year does your state insurance cover the physical therapy for one year?

      In the United States one is looking at paying $1500-$3000 out of pocket for a root canal.. And if they can’t afford it they are as they say out of luck. If an American with no health insurance gets into a car accident and needs physical therapy they have to pay out-of-pocket and if they Dont have the money they are out of luck and will most likely suffer for the rest of their life.
      Your example of a car accident would probably get full coverage for (essential) immediate and short-term care (very basic (non-fancy) hospital room if needed) and then something like 80% cost coverage from 3rd party (employer) insurance for typical recovery (physio, basic medication, etc). I have never had to stay overnight in the hospital thankfully, but my experiences with other significant injuries have followed this basic pattern.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Schmart View Post
        Thanks for asking the question! It forced me to look more into how Canada's system works, realizing that I had some assumptions and basic knowledge, but didn't really know how 'the system works'. I am now better informed

        Wkikipedia has a good explanation. To summarize:

        "Canadian Medicare provides coverage for approximately 70 percent of Canadians' healthcare needs, and the remaining 30 percent is paid for through the private sector.[6] The 30 percent typically relates to services not covered or only partially covered by Medicare, such as prescription drugs, dentistry and optometry.[6] Approximately 65 to 75 percent of Canadians have some form of supplementary health insurance related to the aforementioned reasons; many receive it through their employers or use secondary social service programs related to extended coverage for families receiving social assistance or vulnerable demographics, such as seniors, minors, and those with disabilities.[7][6]"

        Health Care is managed Provincially, but financially supplemented federally. As of Jan 1st, the Province of BC eliminated the nominal approx. $100 monthly fee (although IIRC even that was paid by most employers). The public coverage BC citizens and permanent residents get is:
        • medically required services provided by a physician enroled with MSP;
        • maternity care provided by a physician or a midwife;
        • medically required eye examinations provided by an ophthalmologist or optometrist for adults aged 19-64;
        • annual eye examinations for children aged 0-18 and seniors aged 65+;
        • diagnostic services, including x-rays, provided at approved diagnostic facilities, when ordered by a registered physician, midwife, podiatrist, dental surgeon or oral surgeon;
        • dental and oral surgery, when medically required to be performed in hospital (excluding restorative services, i.e.: fillings, caps, crowns, root canals, etc.)*;
        • orthodontic services related to severe congenital facial abnormalities.
        I imagine most Provinces are similar, and I assume that this accounts for the 70% of healthcare needs described by Wikipedia as being covered by the government.

        The remaining 30% non-essential services not covered in BC:
        • services that are deemed to be not medically required, such as cosmetic surgery;
        • dental services, except as outlined under benefits;
        • routine eye examinations for persons 19 to 64 years of age;
        • eyeglasses, hearing aids, and other equipment or appliances;
        • prescription drugs (see PharmaCare);
        • acupuncture, chiropractic, massage therapy, naturopathy, physical therapy and non-surgical podiatry services (except for MSP beneficiaries receiving supplementary benefits);
        • preventive services and screening tests not supported by evidence of medical effectiveness (for example, routine annual "complete" physical examinations, whole body CT scans, prostate specific antigen (PSA) tests);
        • services of counsellors or psychologists;
        • medical examinations, certificates or tests required for:
          • driving a motor vehicle
          • employment
          • life insurance
          • school or university
          • recreational and sporting activities
          • immigration purposes
        These services will be covered by third party insurance, typically provided through workplace insurance plans or can be purchased separately. Plans will vary, and some can be quite extensive (typically those with larger organizations or numbers of employees). I think the employer provide plans are typically covered by the employer. I don't remember ever paying a fee for the employer coverage.

        I believe a typical third party coverage to include:
        • 80% reimbursement for prescription drugs with $1,000 annual maximum
        • Optional dental care coverage includes preventive (80% reimbursement) and restorative (50% reimbursement)
        • 100% reimbursement for supplemental healthcare. 100% reimbursement for paramedical practitioner services up to maximum $300 per year, per practitioner and a combined maximum of $500 per calendar year
        • Vision care and semi-private hospital room coverage included
        • Combined $250,000 lifetime maximum for all benefits excluding dental and emergency travel medical


        Your example of a car accident would probably get full coverage for (essential) immediate and short-term care (very basic (non-fancy) hospital room if needed) and then something like 80% cost coverage from 3rd party (employer) insurance for typical recovery (physio, basic medication, etc). I have never had to stay overnight in the hospital thankfully, but my experiences with other significant injuries have followed this basic pattern.
        Good list, much the same in my province of New Brunswick. As noted, there are really 10 different government medical programs in Canada, each run by a different province but they are unified by the National Health Act by these 5 principles:

        1 Universality of coverage.
        The provinces have to cover 100 per cent of their residents for hospital and physicians’ services.

        2 Portability of coverage.
        The provinces have to cover their residents for care in other provinces at the rates that pertains in other provinces. They are supposed to cover their residents while out of the country at least at the rates that would have pertained in their home province.

        3 Reasonable accessibility to services.
        The provinces are to ensure that services are “reasonably accessible” and that financial charges or other barriers do not impede access. This criterion also requires the provinces to pay reasonable compensation to their health professionals.

        4 Comprehensiveness of services.
        The provinces are supposed to cover all “medically necessary” services provided by doctors or within hospitals. This criterion is actually a misnomer because community services (such as home care) are not covered and neither are the services of other providers (except dental services within hospitals – a rare event these days).

        5 Public administration.
        The provinces have to administer their health insurance programs either themselves or through a body that is accountable to the provincial government.

        Comment


        • #5
          Now that we have two Canadians posting I have a few questions...

          When it Comes to dental coverage in the USA some root canals are considered essential others are not...how does this work in Canada? Is there a such thing as an essential root canal that will be covered by the state?

          How much would A root canal that is considered non-essential cost in Canada if one has to pay out of pocket? I know in the Republic of Ireland it’s about $300-$500 for a root canal. But in the USA the average cost of a root canal is about $2000.

          If somebody was in a very bad accident in Canada And had to stay in the hospital for 20+ days roughly how much would their room cost per night? I was in the hospital for about 50 days and got a bill for $106,000 which did include a surgery cost that was over 20 k ..Of the total cost I owe 6k a large sum of money but my insurance might cover that there’s a bit of a discrepancy. I stayed at the ICU as well as a rehabilitation unit and the cost per night was around 700 per night at least just for the room. For much of my stay I was lucky to have my room to myself but for a good portion I had to have a roommate. The hospital food was also pretty good we had a menu where we could choose what we want to get. And I am very lucky to have signed up for health insurance before my accident. A good number of Americans don’t have any health insurance which puts them in an awful spot if they get into an accident or get cancer , etc.

          How much does it cost to stay in a nursing home in Canada?

          After my hospital stay I went to a nursing home where I received 3 Low quality meals per day(Surely prison food was better)...I had no surgeries and very minimal physical therapy due to the Covid concerns. And the room rate was $850 per night. I had to leave the nursing home because of how terrible it was.... loud rap music played all night by the workers... I was going to be locked in my room 24/7 because of the Covid concerns for 14 days and I could not handle it. The man in the other room to my left screamed all night ...the poor fellow had dementia and nobody would come and help him. Btw The only reason I went to the nursing home was because my hospital stay was about to come to an end because the insurance company would only pay for a certain amount of time for me to stay in the hospital. To my insurance companies credit I was going to be getting up to 100 days in the nursing home which is quite interesting because it was more time than the insurance company would have allowed me to stay on the rehab floor in the hospital.

          So even a low or medium quality nursing home in the United States will cost folks at least $800 per night and that does not include any sort of surgery and includes the very basic needs. So if I do not have health insurance like many Americans do not have I would’ve had to pay $800 out-of-pocket per night for my nursing home stay. And over $700 out-of-pocket per night for my hospital stay.

          Nursing homes in America are one of the last places that old folks should have to go to. My uncle is in a nursing home with Alzheimer’s disease and he has been left in his own feces...he also contracted covid probably from a worker at the nursing home..The nursing home is draining his bank account because his insurance(and he had a top line policy) won’t cover the nursing home costs anymore.

          It has become abundantly clear that hospital overnight costs are tremendously lower in Sweden compared to the United States.. and that costs of medicine are considerably lower in Sweden compared to the USA.

          The United States is one of the last so-called western countries with no universal healthcare. While we do have some of the greatest doctors and hospitals in America..our healthcare system can be very expensive and also inaccessible to many Americans when they need it.



          One more question to the two Canadian posters. Is there a such thing as essential physical therapy for Canadians? In other words if the Canadian gets into a car accident and cannot move his leg without receiving physical therapy will the state cover that physical therapy until he can walk again?



          Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
          Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

          George S Patton

          Comment


          • #6
            Just a heads up. Not all insurance in the US are the same. An example, when my son was in treatment for over 3 years for cancer everything was covered except meals at the hospital, no co-pays. Chemo was completely covered. Treatment was at Walter Reed. If we went outside of a Military Treatment Facility we would have had co-pays.

            No co-pays for any medicine picked up at a military pharmacy.

            Dental and vision is well covered also with the Fed programs. Our daughter's braces are costing us $100 a month while they are on her teeth.

            The cost of both insurances comes out of my retirement paycheck, for the family it is around $500 a year and dental & vision is an additional $400.
            "I don't discuss sitting presidents," Mattis tells NPR in an interview. "I believe that you owe a period of quiet."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
              Now that we have two Canadians posting I have a few questions...

              When it Comes to dental coverage in the USA some root canals are considered essential others are not...how does this work in Canada? Is there a such thing as an essential root canal that will be covered by the state?
              Don't think so.

              How much would A root canal that is considered non-essential cost in Canada if one has to pay out of pocket? I know in the Republic of Ireland it’s about $300-$500 for a root canal. But in the USA the average cost of a root canal is about $2000.
              A website reports this for a root canal in Canada (C$):
              • Front tooth: $762
              • Bicuspid: $879
              • Molar: $1,111
              [/QUOTE]



              If somebody was in a very bad accident in Canada And had to stay in the hospital for 20+ days roughly how much would their room cost per night? I was in the hospital for about 50 days and got a bill for $106,000 which did include a surgery cost that was over 20 k ..Of the total cost I owe 6k a large sum of money but my insurance might cover that there’s a bit of a discrepancy. I stayed at the ICU as well as a rehabilitation unit and the cost per night was around 700 per night at least just for the room. For much of my stay I was lucky to have my room to myself but for a good portion I had to have a roommate. The hospital food was also pretty good we had a menu where we could choose what we want to get. And I am very lucky to have signed up for health insurance before my accident. A good number of Americans don’t have any health insurance which puts them in an awful spot if they get into an accident or get cancer , etc.
              Hospital cost per night = $0
              ICU cost per night = $0
              Meals=$0
              Surgery=$0

              All these dollar values are in Canadian $.

              You would be probably put in with others and private insurance might cover a semi-private room.

              How much does it cost to stay in a nursing home in Canada?
              I think about 2800 /month, mostly people sign over their government and other pensions and the government covers the difference, I don't think they repossess assets anymore. Costs vary from nursing home to nursing home and by province. Mix of for profit and non-profit NH's.


              One more question to the two Canadian posters. Is there a such thing as essential physical therapy for Canadians? In other words if the Canadian gets into a car accident and cannot move his leg without receiving physical therapy will the state cover that physical therapy until he can walk again?
              From a website:

              Chiropractic is partially covered in some provinces. Cosmetic procedures are not typically covered. ... Physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, nursing, and chiropractic services are often not covered unless within hospitals.Usually after a serious car accident there is extensive physical therapy in the hospital





              Comment


              • #8
                BTW, Canada has nothing to be proud of with it's nursing homes where most of its' COVID deaths came from.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Nichols View Post
                  Just a heads up. Not all insurance in the US are the same. An example, when my son was in treatment for over 3 years for cancer everything was covered except meals at the hospital, no co-pays. Chemo was completely covered. Treatment was at Walter Reed. If we went outside of a Military Treatment Facility we would have had co-pays.

                  No co-pays for any medicine picked up at a military pharmacy.

                  Dental and vision is well covered also with the Fed programs. Our daughter's braces are costing us $100 a month while they are on her teeth.

                  The cost of both insurances comes out of my retirement paycheck, for the family it is around $500 a year and dental & vision is an additional $400.
                  God be with your son. Did you have to pay a few thousand dollars for your sons hospital stays if I can ask? Because I was in the hospital for about 50 days about 30 of them in the rehab unit... and I might have to pay $6000 for that stay out of pocket.

                  When it comes to health insurance in the USA If ones income is low enough they qualify for medicaid and pay 0-20usd per month for the most part. With my deductibles I was lucky to get medicaid but it did not include dental so I had to pay 1500 usd out of pocket for a root canal on A molar. If I did not have the cash I would have had to lose the molar. Truck drivers and food delivery guys in the USA can use mileage deductibles to get medicaid btw...that’s what I did its about 50 cents per mile taken off ones yearly income.


                  Does your dental include root canals or is that paid out of your pocket?

                  900 total per year for health insurance for your family including dental is not to bad. I know a physical therapist assistant paying over 500 usd per month for health insurance for his wife and kid and he has a middle class salary. Thats a huge fee to have to pay.

                  Folks who did not sign up for medicaid or private insurance are at considerably financial risk in the USA if they get into a accident or get cancer.
                  Last edited by Stonewall_Jack; 06 Aug 20, 22:21.
                  Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
                  Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

                  George S Patton

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sparlingo View Post
                    Don't think so.



                    A website reports this for a root canal in Canada (C$):
                    • Front tooth: $762
                    • Bicuspid: $879
                    • Molar: $1,111

                    Originally posted by Sparlingo View Post


                    Hospital cost per night = $0
                    ICU cost per night = $0
                    Meals=$0
                    Surgery=$0

                    All these dollar values are in Canadian $.

                    You would be probably put in with others and private insurance might cover a semi-private room.



                    I think about 2800 /month, mostly people sign over their government and other pensions and the government covers the difference, I don't think they repossess assets anymore. Costs vary from nursing home to nursing home and by province. Mix of for profit and non-profit NH's.



                    From a website:

                    Chiropractic is partially covered in some provinces. Cosmetic procedures are not typically covered. ... Physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, nursing, and chiropractic services are often not covered unless within hospitals.Usually after a serious car accident there is extensive physical therapy in the hospital




                    I saw on a few Canadian websites that the costs of a root canal might be a few hundred dollars lower then your site whether it be a tooth or a molar. But I also came across the website which you provided which had the 1100 CAD price for a molar root canal.

                    By the way a Swedish website showed that a root canal in Sweden would cost about US$300 but did not specify if it was for a molar or non-molar. It just said one root canal.

                    I did some digging and in the USA I found some sites where a root canal on a molar was about $900 but I don’t know if that included various dental fees. In any event my dentist charged $1500 for my root canal in my molar and that was the lowest in the area other dentists wanted over 2000.

                    well I can see the huge difference is the cost of hospital stays to see that it cost nothing for Canadians is remarkable when it costs Americans hundreds of dollars to stay overnight in the hospital.

                    both of our countries have work to do when it comes to nursing homes but it appears that Canada is doing a better job taking care of elderly and residents of nursing homes compared to America‘s medical system.


                    It looks like it cost about US$70 per night at a nursing home in your country whereas in the USA one is looking
                    At $700 per night for a mediocre nursing home.

                    As for physical therapy it sounds like what you’re talking about would be covered when it comes to physical therapy when one is staying at a rehab unit in a hospital. So I wonder how long a state covered Canadian healthcare plan would allow someone to stay at a rehab unit compared to how long Medicaid or a private health insurance company would allow an American to stay and receive physical therapy at a rehab unit in a hospital. I can tell you one of the people I was at the hospital with had a good healthcare plan with Blue Cross Blue Shield ....a private company..... But she was only allowed to stay for 40 days at the rehab unit and when she entered out of rehab physical therapy she had to pay a $50 co-pay each visit which is a considerable amount of money for a middle-class person.

                    for me the greatest Takeaway of all of this would be what you listed as the hospital stays, the ICUs and the cost of surgeries in Canada being nothing. That just blew my mind.
                    Last edited by Stonewall_Jack; 06 Aug 20, 21:58.
                    Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
                    Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

                    George S Patton

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post

                      God be with your son. Did you have to pay a few thousand dollars for your sons hospital stays if I can ask? Because I was in the hospital for about 50 days about 30 of them in the rehab unit... and I might have to pay $6000 for that stay out of pocket.
                      Out of the 1,164 days if treatment he probably spent at least 190 days total in the hospital. We only paid for the food which if I remember right was about $9 a day. That was from Sept 07 to Nov 10.

                      He survived treatment, is currently 18, a certified EMT and will be attending Drexel next month taking the 5 year Phyisians Assistant program. Eventually we wants to become a doctor.

                      In my opinion, Tri Care is as close to quality socialized medicine that one can get in the US. Much better than the VA because for the price of around $500 a year, the family is covered.

                      I really didn't think highly of Tri Care until my son's life was in danger. We almost lost him 3 times while in treatment. Spending 21 years carrying a rifle all over the world paid off.

                      That being said, the Tri Care model is unsustainable for the general population. It costs to much.

                      I am still active in the childhood cancer world. The current model of health care causes more issues than it solves. The same is true world wide when it is looked at from the childhood cancer perspective.

                      Parents in numerous countries are daily making choices about simple....expensive things like IVIG that their insurance doesn't cover....this happens in Canada, England, Australia, EU, India.......all over the world. At Walter Reed it wasn't an issue, the kid needed it, he was given it without playing coordination games with Tri Care.



                      "I don't discuss sitting presidents," Mattis tells NPR in an interview. "I believe that you owe a period of quiet."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
                        [....]
                        In the United States one is looking at paying $1500-$3000 out of pocket for a root canal.. And if they can’t afford it they are as they say out of luck.
                        Depending on whether or not you have had regular check-ups in the previous year, a root canal treatment of 2 teeth will cost you a minimum of 12,50 or 25 Euro here. [assuming you're covered by our public health insurance system obviously].

                        Minimum because you are of course free to visit a more expensive dentist if you so choose.

                        https://www.riziv.fgov.be/nl/profess...t%20of%20niet.

                        Last edited by Snowygerry; 06 Aug 20, 23:24.
                        Lambert of Montaigu - Crusader.

                        Bolgios - Mercenary Game.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post



                          for me the greatest Takeaway of all of this would be what you listed as the hospital stays, the ICUs and the cost of surgeries in Canada being nothing. That just blew my mind.
                          I'd note that US taxpayers spend more per capita on government funded healthcare services than Canadians pay out in taxes per capita on government funded healthcare services. No one believes this but government spending on health care is about 7% of GNP in Canada and the USA is 8%. Total healthcare spending numbers are 11.6% Canada, 18% USA

                          https://www.ephpp.ca/healthcare-fund...icy-in-canada/

                          https://www.crfb.org/papers/american...federal-budget

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Here's a real case history:- me.

                            On the 1st.May, I fell awkwardly and comprehensively broke three bones in my left leg ; a "Trimalleolar Fracture" which rendered me unable to walk.

                            An ambulance to the local hospital: X-rays and a quick operation to point all the bones in the right direction and then another ambulance to another hospital some distance away which specializes in Orthopaedic Surgery . On the 3rd.May a second operation, lasting a little over an hour (I'm told), wherein metal plates were inserted into the bone structure and vast metal screw fitted across the foot to hold the whole assembly together while everything heals:-it comes out next Month.

                            Then a week's stay in the orthopaedic hospital and casts fitted, latterly a second ,rather elegant black fibreglass creation ,after all the needlework was removed.

                            Off back to my local hospital for ten days and the commencement of physiotherapy: a walking frame and then a crutch provided.

                            Back to the orthopaedic hospital ,more X-rays and a Walking "Moon" Boot provided.

                            Then home: and on-going physiotherapy.

                            How much ?

                            Answer:Ten Dollars for each physotherapy session at home (six altogether) and nothing more.

                            This is Australian Medicare, where ,on principle, the best medical care is provided without regard to the patient's ability to pay.

                            A proviso: I am now classified as a pensioner and all my working life I've paid for a degree of Medical Insurance, in addition to the usual Medicare on taxable income (2%) but since leaving full-time employment ,I've dropped this provision.
                            Last edited by BELGRAVE; 07 Aug 20, 01:13.
                            "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
                            Samuel Johnson.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BELGRAVE View Post
                              Here's a real case history:- me.

                              On the 1st.May, I fell awkwardly and comprehensively broke three bones in my left leg ; a "Trimalleolar Fracture" which rendered me unable to walk.

                              An ambulance to the local hospital: X-rays and a quick operation to point all the bones in the right direction and then another ambulance to another hospital some distance away which specializes in Orthopaedic Surgery . On the 3rd.May a second operation, lasting a little over an hour (I'm told), wherein metal plates were inserted into the bone structure and vast metal screw fitted across the foot to hold the whole assembly together while everything heals:-it comes out next Month.

                              Then a week's stay in the orthopaedic hospital and casts fitted, latterly a second ,rather elegant black fibreglass creation ,after all the needlework was removed.

                              Off back to my local hospital for ten days and the commencement of physiotherapy: a walking frame and then a crutch provided.

                              Back to the orthopaedic hospital ,more X-rays and a Walking "Moon" Boot provided.

                              Then home: and on-going physiotherapy.

                              How much ?

                              Answer:Ten Dollars for each physotherapy session at home (six altogether) and nothing more.

                              This is Australian Medicare, where ,on principle, the best medical care is provided without regard to the patient's ability to pay.

                              A proviso: I am now classified as a pensioner and all my working life I've paid for a degree of Medical Insurance, in addition to the usual Medicare on taxable income (2%) but since leaving full-time employment ,I've dropped this provision.
                              Glad to hear you are doing well - even if you are a godless commie with that godless commie love of health care for all people.

                              But yeah he’s right- I could chop off a finger, pack it in ice, turn up to the A&E, and it will be sown back on free. Sure the staff would call me a dickhead but it would be done by the best and done free of charge.
                              Matthew 5:9 Blessed are the cheesemakers

                              That's right bitches. I'm blessed!

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