Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Appeals Court Overturns Marathon Bomber Tsarnaev's Death Sentence

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • asterix
    replied
    Originally posted by lakechampainer View Post

    What does Baltimore have to do with anything?
    Ooops! Should have read Boston! Fixed.

    Leave a comment:


  • lakechampainer
    replied
    Originally posted by asterix View Post
    It sounds like Baltimore just disbanded the SWAT team which captured Tsarnaev.
    What does Baltimore have to do with anything?

    Leave a comment:


  • asterix
    replied
    It sounds like Boston (not Baltimore!) just disbanded the SWAT team which captured Tsarnaev.
    Last edited by asterix; 05 Aug 20, 05:39.

    Leave a comment:


  • lakechampainer
    replied
    Link to Wikipedia article on Tsarnaev's trial.

    His guilt was admitted from the beginning. Essentially it was all about the penalty phase (and setting up grounds for appeal). The attacks were in 2013. If several months are allowed for preparing, for empaneling a jury, etc. very easy to have the trial by September or October 2013. Then a death sentence, then carried out by the end of the year.

    Leave a comment:


  • TactiKill J.
    replied
    He's in prison for life, justice was served.

    Leave a comment:


  • lakechampainer
    replied
    Link to 2019 Boston Herald article about the conditions The Joker lives under at the Supermax in Colorado.

    God forbid someone tests positive for Covid 19 in the complex - the bleeding hearts will instantly be calling for The Joker's release for "humanitarian reasons."

    https://www.bostonherald.com/2019/12...max-ex-warden/

    Leave a comment:


  • Stonewall_Jack
    replied
    Originally posted by lakechampainer View Post
    I was totally for the execution of McVeigh. Not sure why Nichols wasn't convicted to death by the jury; they deadlocked; I have to accept that he had a trial by jury of his peers. He is in prison for life on federal and state murders. (Edit: both the state and federal juries deadlocked during the death penalty phases of Nichols' trials.)

    So my question is simple to the people who are fine with Tsarnaev getting off: Do you think McVeigh should have been executed? And if so, how do you explain the apparent inconsistency?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_Nichols


    Terry Lynn Nichols (born April 1, 1955) is an American domestic terrorist who was convicted of being an accomplice in the Oklahoma City bombing.[4] Prior to his incarceration, he held a variety of short-term jobs, working as a farmer, grain elevator manager, real estate salesman and ranch hand.[5] He met his future co-conspirator, Timothy McVeigh, during a brief stint in the U.S. Army, which ended in 1989 when he requested a hardship discharge after less than one year of service.[5] In 1994 and 1995, he conspired with McVeigh in the planning and preparation of the truck bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on April 19, 1995. The bombing claimed the lives of 168 people.[6]

    After a federal trial in 1997, Nichols was convicted of conspiracy to use a weapon of mass destruction and eight counts of involuntary manslaughter for killing federal law enforcement personnel.[7][8] He was sentenced to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole after the jury deadlocked on the death penalty.[6] He was also tried in Oklahoma on state charges of murder in connection with the bombing. He was convicted in 2004 of 161 counts of first degree murder, including one count of fetal homicide;[6] first-degree arson; and conspiracy.[9] As in the federal trial, the state jury deadlocked on imposing the death penalty.[6][10] He was sentenced to 161 consecutive life terms without the possibility of parole,[4][6] and is incarcerated at ADX Florence, a super maximum security prison near Florence, Colorado. He shares a cell block that is commonly referred to as "Bombers Row" with Ramzi Yousef, Eric Rudolph, and Ted Kaczynski.
    I’m against the death penalty completely. When it comes to the topic of the death penalty we will see a huge chunk of people for it or against it...those against being so no matter the level of crime committed by the perpetrator.


    And I don’t think the younger brother got off or got a lenient sentence . He is in A Supermax prison. Which is among the harshest prisons in the history of the world.

    But also here in America there are plenty of examples of very violent criminals getting life in prison when they did qualify for the death penalty.

    Sorry if I offend you. I agree with most of what you said except that I’m against the death penalty

    Leave a comment:


  • Judith
    replied
    I always thought there was something strange about Nichols...

    Leave a comment:


  • lakechampainer
    replied
    I was totally for the execution of McVeigh. Not sure why Nichols wasn't convicted to death by the jury; they deadlocked; I have to accept that he had a trial by jury of his peers. He is in prison for life on federal and state murders. (Edit: both the state and federal juries deadlocked during the death penalty phases of Nichols' trials.)

    So my question is simple to the people who are fine with Tsarnaev getting off: Do you think McVeigh should have been executed? And if so, how do you explain the apparent inconsistency?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_Nichols


    Terry Lynn Nichols (born April 1, 1955) is an American domestic terrorist who was convicted of being an accomplice in the Oklahoma City bombing.[4] Prior to his incarceration, he held a variety of short-term jobs, working as a farmer, grain elevator manager, real estate salesman and ranch hand.[5] He met his future co-conspirator, Timothy McVeigh, during a brief stint in the U.S. Army, which ended in 1989 when he requested a hardship discharge after less than one year of service.[5] In 1994 and 1995, he conspired with McVeigh in the planning and preparation of the truck bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on April 19, 1995. The bombing claimed the lives of 168 people.[6]

    After a federal trial in 1997, Nichols was convicted of conspiracy to use a weapon of mass destruction and eight counts of involuntary manslaughter for killing federal law enforcement personnel.[7][8] He was sentenced to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole after the jury deadlocked on the death penalty.[6] He was also tried in Oklahoma on state charges of murder in connection with the bombing. He was convicted in 2004 of 161 counts of first degree murder, including one count of fetal homicide;[6] first-degree arson; and conspiracy.[9] As in the federal trial, the state jury deadlocked on imposing the death penalty.[6][10] He was sentenced to 161 consecutive life terms without the possibility of parole,[4][6] and is incarcerated at ADX Florence, a super maximum security prison near Florence, Colorado. He shares a cell block that is commonly referred to as "Bombers Row" with Ramzi Yousef, Eric Rudolph, and Ted Kaczynski.
    Last edited by lakechampainer; 02 Aug 20, 13:33.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jose50
    replied
    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

    Or he will become a cellblock celebrity. The more heinous the crimes, the more brownie points for the animal responsible.

    The inmates in our prisons are not normal human beings like we are.
    So...why keep them?

    Leave a comment:


  • lakechampainer
    replied
    Wikipedia article on Mr. Tamarlan Tsarnaev, aka Speedbump. Followed by excerpts.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamerlan_Tsarnaev

    excerpt 1

    Tamerlan Anzorovich Tsarnaev (/ˌtæmərˈlɑːn ˌtsɑːrˈnaɪɛf/; October 21, 1986 – April 19, 2013)[note 1] was a Soviet-born terrorist who, with his brother Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, planted pressure cooker bombs at the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013.[1][3][4][5] The bombings killed three people and reportedly injured as many as 264 others.[6] Tsarnaev was of half-Chechen and half-Avar descent.[7] He emigrated to the United States in 2004 at the age of 18.[8] At the time of the bombings, Tsarnaev was an aspiring boxer.[9]

    Shortly after the Federal Bureau of Investigation declared them suspects in the bombings and released images of them, the Tsarnaev brothers killed an MIT policeman, carjacked a SUV, and engaged in a shootout with the police in the Boston suburb of Watertown. According to the federal indictment, during the shootout, Tsarnaev was captured but died, partly as a result of his brother driving over him, and an MBTA police officer was critically injured in the course of Dzhokhar's escape in the SUV[10] (the former by what may have been friendly fire).[11] An injured Dzhokhar escaped, but was found, arrested, and hospitalized on the evening of April 19 after an unprecedented manhunt in which thousands of police searched a 20-block area of Watertown.[12]

    During his incarceration, Tsarnaev's brother allegedly said during questioning that the pair next intended to detonate explosives in Times Square in New York City.[13] Dzhokhar reportedly also said to authorities that he and his brother were radicalized, at least in part, by watching Anwar al-Awlaki lectures.[14]

    ================================================== ============

    excerpt 2

    2011[edit]


    In early 2011, Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB) told the Federal Bureau of Investigation that Tsarnaev was a follower of Islamic extremism and a strong believer. The FSB said that he was preparing to leave the United States to travel to the Russian region to join unspecified underground groups.[74][75] The FBI initially denied that it had contacted Tsarnaev, but then said that it actually had after Tsarnaev's mother talked about the FBI's contacts with her son on RT.[76] The FBI said that it interviewed him and relatives of his, but did not find any terrorist activity, and that it provided the results in the summer of 2011.[75] At that point, the FBI asked the FSB for more information, but the Russians did not respond to the American request, and the FBI officially closed the case.[77]

    Tsarnaev's mother said that FBI agents had told her they feared her son was an "extremist leader", and that he was getting information from "extremist sites".[78][79] She said Tsarnaev had been under FBI surveillance for at least three years and that "they were controlling every step of him". The FBI flatly denied this accusation.[80][81] Tsarnaev "vaguely discussed" jihad during a 2011 phone call with his mother that was taped by the FSB, and intelligence officials also discovered text messages in which his mother discussed how he was ready to die for Islam.[82] In late 2011, the Central Intelligence Agency put both Tsarnaev and his mother on its Terrorist Identities Datamart Environment database.[82][83]

    Leave a comment:


  • Judith
    replied
    All i said was Dukakis is a bad example. Manafort was the first who came in my mind to profit from the elite treatment. Robel went to jail and did the whole time. I also think that taking side with Robel was a pretty dumb move.

    Eh, who did Trumpski send his condolences out again? John Lewis?

    Leave a comment:


  • lakechampainer
    replied
    If you don't understand that a former governor shouldn't write a friendly letter in support of someone he knows in any case, never mind in a case where there was "mass destruction", you don't understand anything about American norms.

    Weren't you just criticizing Trump for sending out his condolences upon the death of someone he knew?????

    Leave a comment:


  • Judith
    replied
    Sorry, but in this case i dont buy the elite thing. Dukakis knew Robel Phillipos since he was a little kid. He was long time friends with the Phillipos family. Robel got 3,5 years of prison time for lying to the FBI about knowledge of two of his friends removal of a Backpack and a Laptop. His mother probably asked Dukakis if he couldnt try to support the family and he did. Robel paid the price to what he did, he wasnt released or anything.

    I am completely with you on elites living under a different law in the US, but this is a bad example and it has nothing to do with Dzhokhars change of death penalty or with democrats being evilous people.

    There are plenty, tons of cases where elites play out their advantages before court, this one i just dont see it.

    You could compare Paul Manafort to Robel Phillipos for example both got 3,5 years for lying to the FBI. Manafort was additionally convicted for bank fraud and tax evasion. His case concerned millions of dollars. While Robel did his jailtime, Paul is playing Playstation at home. Thats the difference between elites and normal people.
    Last edited by Judith; 02 Aug 20, 11:38.

    Leave a comment:


  • lakechampainer
    replied
    And at the risk of stating the obvious:

    2. Classic "news dump" - after close of business Friday, in the middle of the summer.

    1. Sure looks like there is going to be a democratic administration - that's what I think - more importantly, I think that contributed to the decision now. Tsarnaev will never be executed.

    I used to not like the fact 2 republicans went on the Supreme Court this term - Now I'm starting to like it, especially as the court as a whole doesn't seem to be activist, rather incrementalist. I don't think they will overturn the death penalty, but there will be no federal death penalties in the next 4 years. And if someone is somehow sentenced to death, you know the lawyers, probably Judy Clarke, will say, it is unfair to give a death sentence, since even Tsarnaev wasn't executed!
    Last edited by lakechampainer; 02 Aug 20, 14:22.

    Leave a comment:

Latest Topics

Collapse

Working...
X