Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Trump Must 'Dislike' Teachers and Children...

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Vaeltaja
    replied
    Or the Korean study: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/18/h...n-schools.html
    Which implies that children from 10-19 spread the disease just as effectively as adults. Children from 0-9 do it less but the risk is still not zero.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vaeltaja
    replied
    Originally posted by Surrey View Post
    It is setting a benchmark for what risk is considered acceptable.
    The problem in your argument is that we don't even know the full extent of the risk posed by this disease yet. But that doesn't seem to be a problem for you in your rush.
    The risk of death or long term consequences is clearly considered acceptable.
    Is the known risk (which has already happened) that teachers perish from it too? Is that acceptable for you? Or are you just ignoring the risk for the teachers? https://www.jpost.com/israel-news/te...f-virus-635481
    So to close schools the risk to children must be significantly higher. There is no evidence that is the case. What evidence there is indicates that flu is more dangerous to children than Covid. So children ‘s safety is not sufficiently threatened to justify school closure.
    How do you know that if you do not even yet know the full extent of the risk posed by this disease? All your flu comparisons are pointless and useless. This is not a flu. We already know it can cause long term damage, we just don't know how much. Yet that part is not a problem to you. Nor is apparently throwing the teachers under the bus either. That is how you come across. If that is not what intended then please do clarify.

    Unless it wasn't clear to you, opening schools does not just please the children at risk. It also places the teachers, staff, families of the students, the whole lot. But that apparently is not a problem for you either even though case where that occurs are already known.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vaeltaja
    replied
    Originally posted by Surrey View Post
    Yes you do. As I have said there is occasionally long term damage caused by flu.
    Yet you miss the somewhat crucial detail that this is not a flu. If you want to compare this to something then at least try to hold sense in your comparisons and use SARS as the comparison. It caused quite a list of long term effects far more than a flu. If you want to deceive yourself and believe that this is 'just a flu' then fine, but don't expect others believe you.
    Yet schools are not closed in a flu pandemic. Flu is much more dangerous to children than Covid is. Saying that occasionally Covid causes long term damage is meaningless unless you can give an indication of how often.
    While the direct mortality from Covid-19 is with children is low that does not translate into that it would not be able to be causing long term damage in children. We already know it does. We also know that the closest comparable virus (which caused SARS epidemic) causes those too. Furthermore there already are several cases where children have spread the disease into their teachers leading to the teachers perishing from the disease. It just is not as simple a matter as you seem to imagine.

    Leave a comment:


  • Surrey
    replied
    Originally posted by Vaeltaja View Post
    We are not talking about a flu. So that comparison of yours is worthless.

    Anecdotal evidence is the best evidence eh?
    It is setting a benchmark for what risk is considered acceptable. The risk of death or long term consequences is clearly considered acceptable. So to close schools the risk to children must be significantly higher. There is no evidence that is the case. What evidence there is indicates that flu is more dangerous to children than Covid. So children ‘s safety is not sufficiently threatened to justify school closure.

    Leave a comment:


  • Surrey
    replied
    Originally posted by Vaeltaja View Post
    How many have been hospitalized or in ICU. You don't need either of those for long term damage to occur. Hence it is fine only if and when the spread of the disease is in control. Not every where at the same time and certainly not by political decree.
    Yes you do. As I have said there is occasionally long term damage caused by flu. Yet schools are not closed in a flu pandemic. Flu is much more dangerous to children than Covid is. Saying that occasionally Covid causes long term damage is meaningless unless you can give an indication of how often.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vaeltaja
    replied
    Originally posted by Surrey View Post
    How many of that 30% have been hospitalized? How many are in ICU? How many are they? 30% of what? Florida kids are not unique. Yes they sometimes get it but generally are asymmetric or have mild symptoms.
    How many have been hospitalized or in ICU. You don't need either of those for long term damage to occur. Hence it is fine only if and when the spread of the disease is in control. Not every where at the same time and certainly not by political decree.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vaeltaja
    replied
    Originally posted by Surrey View Post
    As I have said the flu can very rarely cause long term effects. That is considered an acceptable risk.
    We are not talking about a flu. So that comparison of yours is worthless.
    We do not close schools every winter. None of the children in my daughters class caught Covid since they went back to school. Or at least reported as such. Nore did any of the teachers.
    Anecdotal evidence is the best evidence eh?

    Leave a comment:


  • Surrey
    replied
    Originally posted by Massena View Post

    The information on the thirty percent of those newly infected in Florida being 18 and under was from yesterday. Your information is out of date and now irrelevant.
    How many of that 30% have been hospitalized? How many are in ICU? How many are they? 30% of what? Florida kids are not unique. Yes they sometimes get it but generally are asymmetric or have mild symptoms.

    Leave a comment:


  • Massena
    replied
    Originally posted by Surrey View Post

    I have shown plenty of links showing that children suffer from Covid much less than adults. The only people who are significantly vulnerable are the elderly or those with serious underlying conditions.

    Florida kids aren't any different to children elsewhere.
    The information on the thirty percent of those newly infected in Florida being 18 and under was from yesterday. Your information is out of date and now irrelevant.

    Leave a comment:


  • Surrey
    replied
    Originally posted by Vaeltaja View Post
    If the discussion was only about schoolkids life, then i would agree. Since the odds indeed are that small. However the issue is not limited to the schoolkid's life but also potential long term effects, life and long term health effects of other schoolkids, teachers, school staff, parent and families of other schoolkids... Which makes it quite a bit more complex issue (Israeli example shows that schoolkids can spread the disease despite of the lack of symptoms). Because of that if there is an option to have interactive remote learning with video streams then i would go with video streams until the such time that the overall risk can be reduced (rate of infection is lower).
    As I have said the flu can very rarely cause long term effects. That is considered an acceptable risk. We do not close schools every winter. None of the children in my daughters class caught Covid since they went back to school. Or at least reported as such. Nore did any of the teachers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Surrey
    replied
    Originally posted by Massena View Post

    Thirty percent of the sick in Florida are 18 and under. Please try and keep up. And take your own advice and 'do even a small amount of research.'

    And education won't be lost, merely delayed. What has to be addressed first is the pandemic.

    And school-age children can infect their parents and grand parents...

    To continue downplaying the seriousness and risks of the pandemic is not only dangerous, but it is misrepresenting the pandemic.
    I have shown plenty of links showing that children suffer from Covid much less than adults. The only people who are significantly vulnerable are the elderly or those with serious underlying conditions.

    Florida kids aren't any different to children elsewhere.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vaeltaja
    replied
    Originally posted by Surrey View Post
    If you do even a small amount of research you will know that the odds of your son getting seriously sick from COVID are tiny and of dying are minute. Far more likely to hurt himself falling down the stairs in your house. We all face risks when we go outside of the house. We could get knocked over by a car, struck by lightning, mugged, a plane could crash on us etc.

    I did a masters via distance learning but we are not talking about adults we are talking about children. My daughter age five has gone back to school. I have no concern regarding the Covid risk because I took the time to do the research and found out that the risk is insignificant compared to the normal everyday risks that we face by merely walking down the street. On the overhand the cost to her in lost education would be very real and potentially long lasting. So a microscopic risk from Covid vs the certain cost of lost education. I know which one I would chose.
    If the discussion was only about schoolkids life, then i would agree. Since the odds indeed are that small. However the issue is not limited to the schoolkid's life but also potential long term effects, life and long term health effects of other schoolkids, teachers, school staff, parent and families of other schoolkids... Which makes it quite a bit more complex issue (Israeli example shows that schoolkids can spread the disease despite of the lack of symptoms). Because of that if there is an option to have interactive remote learning with video streams then i would go with video streams until the such time that the overall risk can be reduced (rate of infection is lower).

    Leave a comment:


  • Massena
    replied
    Originally posted by Surrey View Post

    If you do even a small amount of research you will know that the odds of your son getting seriously sick from COVID are tiny and of dying are minute. Far more likely to hurt himself falling down the stairs in your house. We all face risks when we go outside of the house. We could get knocked over by a car, struck by lightning, mugged, a plane could crash on us etc.

    I did a masters via distance learning but we are not talking about adults we are talking about children. My daughter age five has gone back to school. I have no concern regarding the Covid risk because I took the time to do the research and found out that the risk is insignificant compared to the normal everyday risks that we face by merely walking down the street. On the overhand the cost to her in lost education would be very real and potentially long lasting. So a microscopic risk from Covid vs the certain cost of lost education. I know which one I would chose.
    Thirty percent of the sick in Florida are 18 and under. Please try and keep up. And take your own advice and 'do even a small amount of research.'

    And education won't be lost, merely delayed. What has to be addressed first is the pandemic.

    And school-age children can infect their parents and grand parents...

    To continue downplaying the seriousness and risks of the pandemic is not only dangerous, but it is misrepresenting the pandemic.

    Leave a comment:


  • Surrey
    replied
    Originally posted by Massena View Post

    Yes, it is. But if it is run in the right way, it can be beneficial. My son is in his first year of college and is taking his courses on line. He had a hard time transitioning, but he had the self-discipline to get it done.

    And if the alternative is getting sick and possibly dying from the virus, then there is no choice in the matter.

    I got my masters on line and it was both interesting and beneficial (as well as expensive) and was well worth the effort.

    Friends of mine who are teachers are nervous about going back and afraid of getting sick-and many parents are concerned about their childrens' health.

    Our county made the decision to have two days attending regular classes and three on line. We'll see how that works out.

    I wonder if Trump, for all his demagoguery and bluster, as well as making his usual 'decrees' on the subject, is going to send his son back to school or if he even cares about the boy. According to his niece, he only cares about money and himself.
    If you do even a small amount of research you will know that the odds of your son getting seriously sick from COVID are tiny and of dying are minute. Far more likely to hurt himself falling down the stairs in your house. We all face risks when we go outside of the house. We could get knocked over by a car, struck by lightning, mugged, a plane could crash on us etc.

    I did a masters via distance learning but we are not talking about adults we are talking about children. My daughter age five has gone back to school. I have no concern regarding the Covid risk because I took the time to do the research and found out that the risk is insignificant compared to the normal everyday risks that we face by merely walking down the street. On the overhand the cost to her in lost education would be very real and potentially long lasting. So a microscopic risk from Covid vs the certain cost of lost education. I know which one I would chose.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vaeltaja
    replied
    Originally posted by Surrey View Post
    On line education is a poor substitute for real schooling as some of the links I have posted from various child psychologists show.
    It is not perfect. Also there is a difference between on-line education and fully interactive (like Zoom or ) education. Here they used interactive systems so teacher could discuss matters with the students and so on.

    Leave a comment:

Latest Topics

Collapse

Working...
X