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  • #91
    Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post

    I would say that I don't understand why Europeans have a superiority complex and at the same time believe utter horseshite.
    Maybe something in the water, or air ?
    Or perhaps compensating for inferiority ~ they are the most recent colonizers and exploiters around the planet, then had such come back on them.
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
    “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
    Present Current Events are the Future's History

    Comment


    • #92
      How Coronavirus Tests Actually Work

      EXCERPT:
      ...
      The coronavirus crisis is in large part a testing crisis. We are reading about tests. Arguing about tests. And, in many cases, struggling mightily to obtain tests for ourselves. But while test shortages are making headlines, there’s a lot about the technology behind these tests that isn’t as clear to the public. It’s like we’re all on one of those reality shows where you agree to marry a total stranger, entering into a high-stakes relationship with someone you couldn’t pick out of a crowd.

      So let’s get a little more acquainted with the tests we can’t stop talking about. At the very least, learning a little more about the tests for COVID-19 will help you understand why it’s so hard to get one when you need it.

      What happens when you get a COVID-19 test?

      First, a medical professional puts a swab — an extra long, one-headed Q-tip — way, way, way up your nose. That captures viral particles, along with a bunch of other stuff that Dr. Davey Smith, a research virologist at the University of California, San Diego, referred to as “biological gunk,” like mucus and random cells. The next step, Smith said, is isolating the viral RNA — the genetic material that the virus uses to replicate itself. The RNA in a virus like the one that causes COVID-19 is similar to DNA, but instead of the twisted ladder of a double helix, it’s half that because it’s split down the middle. Some viruses carry their genetic code as DNA, but RNA viruses mutate a lot faster. That feature helps them jump species and evade both natural and medical efforts to kill them. Influenza, for instance, mutates so quickly that we need a new vaccine for it every year.

      Just like DNA can identify a person, RNA can identify the virus that causes COVID-19. Isolating it requires a series of steps — adding different chemicals and repeatedly spinning the sample in a centrifuge — that aim to separate the sample into layers like a fancy cocktail shot, with the layer containing the RNA floating on the top. Then the RNA has to be further purified. There’s more than one way to separate out RNA, and companies sell kits that include the chemicals you need to make it work (called reagents, because they’re used to induce a chemical reaction).
      ....
      https://fivethirtyeight.com/features...=pocket-newtab
      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
      “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
      Present Current Events are the Future's History

      Comment


      • #93
        Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post

        I would say that I don't understand why Europeans have a superiority complex and at the same time believe utter horseshite.
        I am sorry if my comments make you feel inferior.

        Actually what i am saying is that Germany made grave mistakes in recognizing the seriousness and implications of this disease. The German government reacted two weeks too late. This will cause several thousand deaths here pretty soon.

        The US already has twice the number of cases and four times the number of deaths compared to Germany even though you started one week later with taking the threat more seriously.

        People over in your country still do not understand how serious it is. I do not state this from a point of superiority, i do this from the perspective of someone who is one week ahead in the progression of the disease and the fight against it.

        Your situation is serious and even if you dont believe it now, your government is working against you by spreading misinformation. This already showed and it will very soon affect every one of you. Its up to you to take this serious or not. The virus doesnt care.

        If you dont want to consider my opinion thats ok to me, i do not want to sound superior or make you feel inferior. The virus is here and either we take up the fight against it together or each by his own, there is no way to avoid it. I dont want to see you lose and thats what i think is very obvious if you keep on denying the seriousness of the threat.

        Numbers do not count if your relatives die because you havnt defended them.
        Last edited by Judith; 27 Mar 20, 04:08.

        Comment


        • #94
          I was speaking more to your broad brushing white americans as being racists. You watch too much of one perspective and haven't met many of us.

          As to the seriousness of it, it is very serious. It's extremely serious. And it's most serious for those who live in major metropolitan areas. I honestly don't think there is even a corollary in Europe for my area, and my area isn't what I'd call lightly populated. We have 10 cases, all travel related, that have popped up.....and none of those cases are currently hospitalized.

          The level of response that you need in more densely populated areas is totally different than what you need in other areas. You can't bleat enough to the average people in this sort of region that they all need to self-confine for the next 2 weeks or else everyone's gonna die. To NYC, SF, Detroit, or LA....sure.
          Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

          Comment


          • #95
            Some mis-information and mis-direction, to be expected from a partisan source, but FWIW;

            How the Pandemic Will End
            The U.S. may end up with the worst COVID-19 outbreak in the industrialized world. This is how it’s going to play out.
            ................
            Three months ago, no one knew that SARS-CoV-2 existed. Now the virus has spread to almost every country, infecting at least 446,000 people whom we know about, and many more whom we do not. It has crashed economies and broken health-care systems, filled hospitals and emptied public spaces. It has separated people from their workplaces and their friends. It has disrupted modern society on a scale that most living people have never witnessed. Soon, most everyone in the United States will know someone who has been infected. Like World War II or the 9/11 attacks, this pandemic has already imprinted itself upon the nation’s psyche.

            A global pandemic of this scale was inevitable. In recent years, hundreds of health experts have written books, white papers, and op-eds warning of the possibility. Bill Gates has been telling anyone who would listen, including the 18 million viewers of his TED Talk. In 2018, I wrote a story for The Atlantic arguing that America was not ready for the pandemic that would eventually come. In October, the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security war-gamed what might happen if a new coronavirus swept the globe. And then one did. Hypotheticals became reality. “What if?” became “Now what?”
            .............
            https://www.theatlantic.com/health/a...=pocket-newtab
            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
            “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
            Present Current Events are the Future's History

            Comment


            • #96
              Pending time to excerpt and a better thread for placement;
              The Lost Month: How a Failure to Test Blinded the U.S. to Covid-19

              https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/th...z&ocid=msnbcrd
              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
              “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
              Present Current Events are the Future's History

              Comment


              • #97
                Originally posted by Surrey View Post

                Golf courses are still open here as well despite the closure of gyms.

                Probably because you can do it by yourself.
                Actually it the high rate in of exchange body fluids on workout surfaces and equipment.
                Last edited by Salinator; 29 Mar 20, 00:04.
                Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                Prayers.

                BoRG

                http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

                Comment


                • #98
                  Originally posted by Salinator View Post

                  Actually it the high rate in of exchange body fluids on workout surfaces and equipment.
                  Which is why my wife and I would use those sani-wipes both before and after using equipment we came in contact with/touched at our gym - now closed BTW.
                  TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                  “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                  Present Current Events are the Future's History

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    The Four Possible Timelines for Life Returning to Normal

                    The coronavirus outbreak may last for a year or two, but some elements of pre-pandemic life will likely be won back in the meantime.
                    ..........
                    The new coronavirus has brought American life to a near standstill, closing businesses, canceling large gatherings, and keeping people at home. All of those people must surely be wondering: When will things return to normal?

                    The answer is simple, if not exactly satisfying: when enough of the population—possibly 60 or 80 percent of people—is resistant to COVID-19 to stifle the disease’s spread from person to person. That is the end goal, although no one knows exactly how long it will take to get there.

                    There are two realistic paths to achieving this “population-level immunity.” One is the development of a vaccine. The other is for the disease to work its way through the population, surely killing many, but also leaving many others—those who contract the disease and then recover—immune. “They’re just Teflon at that point,” meaning they can’t get infected again and they won’t pass on the disease, explains Andrew Noymer, a public-health professor at the University of California at Irvine. Once enough people reach Teflon status—though we don’t yet know if recovering from the disease confers any immunity at all, let alone lifelong immunity—normalcy will be restored.

                    Unfortunately, both of these paths could be a year or two long, but degrees of normalcy will likely be won back in the meantime: Come summer, Americans might get restaurants but no music festivals, offices but no crowded beaches, bars with spaced-out seating. Projecting when each facet of daily life will be restored would be easier if public-health authorities had an omniscient view of who is infected, who has recovered and become immune, and who is still susceptible—this is the information that would emerge from widespread testing, which the United States is terribly behind on deploying.

                    As such, America is currently left with self-isolation, a blunt tactic that can slow the spread of the virus, potentially sparing the country’s hospitals from a catastrophic overload of patients, but that comes at the cost of freezing daily life. Epidemiologists I interviewed stressed that they have no idea when life will be unfrozen, but they walked me through a series of possible timelines on which Americans might be able to safely start leaving the house to make money or do fun things again. Below are those timelines, including some turning points to look out for in the coming weeks, months, and years.

                    No matter what, staying safe means staying home for a while yet, despite Donald Trump’s desire, expressed at a Fox News town hall on Tuesday, “to have the country opened up, and just raring to go, by Easter.” Moving back toward normalcy at this early stage could be disastrous. “Prematurely ending severe social distancing would be an incredible blunder that would have major human consequences,” Noymer told me. “What is ‘prematurely’? The truth is, we don’t know yet, exactly, but it’s longer than a fortnight. It could be eight to 12 weeks.”

                    ..........
                    https://www.theatlantic.com/family/a...=pocket-newtab

                    A reminder that it took weeks to identify the virus in order to start to develop tests and a while to improve effective and accurate tests.
                    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                    “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                    Present Current Events are the Future's History

                    Comment


                    • 'It’s a razor’s edge we’re walking': inside the race to develop a coronavirus vaccine

                      Around the world, more than 40 teams are working on a vaccine for Covid-19. We followed one doctor in the most urgent quest of his life.

                      ....................
                      Of the dozens of places where a coronavirus vaccine might be born, one is DIOSynVax, a small company started by a Canadian pathologist named Jonathan Heeney. In ordinary times, I’d have visited Heeney in his office, in a stately red-brick building in Cambridge. I’d have met his team and his Aria III cytometer, which looks like as if might brew a strong, space-age espresso but which, in fact, uses its four lasers to separate cells marked with fluorescent dyes as they flow through the machine at 10,000 cells per second. I’d have tried to wangle my way into the lab designated containment level 3, the highest-but-one level of biosafety security, where Heeney’s biologists investigate pathogens such as the West Nile virus or the tuberculosis bacterium. These would be so lethal if they escaped that the lab is nearly hermetic. The joints along the walls, floor and ceiling are sealed and re-sealed; the steel panels in the walls, according to government guidelines, have to be “of the type used in the nuclear industry”; a flow of air must constantly be forced in if the door is open, to prevent the germs inside from drifting out. I would have even seen the coronavirus vaccine candidates themselves: samples of clear liquid, held in glass vials.

                      But Heeney couldn’t take the risk. Understandably, he didn’t want anyone carrying Covid-19 into his lab and infecting his staff. “It’s a challenge already, because when they go home to their families every day, you don’t know who they’re passing on the bus or the train,” he said when I first spoke to him last week. At the time, Heeney was considering quarantining himself. A Cambridge college had offered him a room, so that he could shuttle between lab and bed, meeting as few people as possible. “I don’t have time to get sick,” Heeney said. He runs his company out of Cambridge University’s department of veterinary medicine, where he is a professor. He’s just a 12-minute bicycle ride from where I live, but we video-conferenced on Zoom.

                      Since 2016, Heeney has been honing a set of methods – a platform, in vaccine parlance – that can be used to fashion vaccines that destroy whole families of viruses. Last year, he won a Gates Foundation grant of $2m (1.6m) to fund research into a universal flu vaccine – one that will prevail against every kind of flu virus. “It’s the mother of all challenges, the holy grail,” Heeney said. In January, he kept an eye on a new disease that was flying across eastern China. After two weeks, when Chinese scientists published the coronavirus’s genetic sequence, Heeney told me his team decided: “Let’s do with this what we’re doing with the flu.”

                      Defeating Covid-19 will call for more than vaccines; it will involve quarantines, social distancing, antivirals and other drugs, and healthcare for the sick. But the idea of a vaccine – the quintessential silver bullet – has come to bear an almost unreasonable allure. The coronavirus arrived at a ripe moment in genetic technology, when the advances of the past half-decade have made it possible for vaccine projects to explode off the blocks as soon as a virus is sequenced. These cutting-edge vaccines don’t use weakened forms of the germ to build our immunity, as all vaccines once did; rather, they contain short copies of parts of the germ’s genetic code – its DNA or RNA – which can produce fragments of the germ within our bodies.

                      Thus, for the first time ever, scientists have been able to muster up vaccine prospects mere weeks into a new, fast-spreading disease. Right now, there are at least 43 Covid-19 vaccines in development around the world – in Brisbane and Hong Kong, in the US and the UK, in the labs of universities and companies. Most of these are DNA or RNA vaccines. One vaccine, made in 63 days by an American biotech firm named Moderna, moved into human trials on 16 March, entering the bloodstream of the first of 45 healthy adult volunteers in Seattle. It was a “world indoor record”, said Anthony Fauci, the doctor who heads the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. “Nothing has ever gone that fast.”

                      Until this century, crafting a vaccine for even a long-familiar pathogen such as the polio virus, ushering it through trials and bringing it to market could take as long as 10 or 20 years. The first of these three stages is now staggeringly quick; a scientist at one company, Inovio Pharmaceuticals, told New Scientist magazine that her team had a preliminary model for a Covid-19 vaccine after just three hours of work.

                      The thrust of this revolution – the capacity to create an infinitesimal part of an already minute virus, without handling a virus specimen at all – can seem godlike. But the next two stages – testing vaccines in humans and then manufacturing them for wide use – remain mortally slow. This is especially so because these newest types of vaccines – DNA or RNA vaccines – have never yet been licensed for use on humans. Outside a lab, they are completely unproven. With Covid-19, both contagion and vaccine are so new that there’s no telling what human trials will reveal, or how long they will take. Every scientist, policymaker and researcher I spoke to said that we’ll be lucky to have a vaccine for use within 12-18 months.
                      .............................
                      https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...=pocket-newtab


                      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                      “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                      Present Current Events are the Future's History

                      Comment


                      • How Does the Coronavirus Behave Inside a Patient?


                        We’ve counted the viral spread across peoples; now we need to count it within people.
                        ............
                        Vaccination with live virus was a tightrope walk: if the amount of viral inoculum in the powder was too great, the child would succumb to a full-fledged version of the disease—a disaster that occurred perhaps one in a hundred times. If all went well, the child would have a mild experience of the disease, and be immunized for life. By the seventeen-hundreds, the practice had spread throughout the Arab world. In the seventeen-sixties, women in Sudan practiced tishteree el jidderee (“buying the pox”): one mother haggling with another over how many of a sick child’s ripe pustules she would buy for her own son or daughter. It was an exquisitely measured art: the most astute traditional healers recognized the lesions that were likely to yield just enough viral material, but not too much. The European name for the disease, variola, comes from the Latin for “spotted” or “pimpled.” The process of immunizing against the pox was called “variolation.”

                        Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, the wife of the British Ambassador to Constantinople, had herself been stricken by the disease, in 1715, leaving her perfect skin pitted with scars. Later, in the Turkish countryside, she witnessed the practice of variolation, and wrote to her friends in wonder, describing the work of one specialist: “The old woman comes with a nut-shell full of the matter of the best sort of small-pox, and asks what vein you please to have opened,” whereupon she “puts into the vein as much matter as can lie upon the head of her needle.” Patients retired to bed for a couple of days with a fever, and, Lady Montagu noted, emerged remarkably unscathed. “They have very rarely above twenty or thirty in their faces, which never mark; and in eight days’ time they are as well as before their illness.” She reported that thousands safely underwent the operation every year, and that the disease had largely been contained in the region. “You may believe I am well satisfied of the safety of this experiment,” she added, “since I intend to try it on my dear little son.” Her son never got the pox.

                        In the centuries since Lady Montagu marvelled at the efficacy of inoculation, we’ve made unimaginable discoveries in the biology and epidemiology of infectious disease, and yet the COVID-19 pandemic poses no shortage of puzzles. Why did it spread like wildfire in Italy, thousands of miles from its initial epicenter, in Wuhan, while India appears so far to have largely been spared? What animal species transmitted the original infection to humans?

                        But three questions deserve particular attention, because their answers could change the way we isolate, treat, and manage patients. First, what can we learn about the “dose-response curve” for the initial infection—that is, can we quantify the increase in the risk of infection as people are exposed to higher doses of the virus? Second, is there a relationship between that initial “dose” of virus and the severity of the disease—that is, does more exposure result in graver illness? And, third, are there quantitative measures of how the virus behaves in infected patients (e.g., the peak of your body’s viral load, the patterns of its rise and fall) that predict the severity of their illness and how infectious they are to others? So far, in the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have been measuring the spread of the virus across people. As the pace of the pandemic escalates, we also need to start measuring the virus within people.
                        ...................
                        https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...=pocket-newtab
                        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                        “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                        Present Current Events are the Future's History

                        Comment


                        • How the $2 trillion deal came together — and nearly fell apart


                          Inside McConnell, Schumer and Mnuchin’s race to rescue the economy.
                          ..............
                          It was going to cost $1 trillion.

                          Late on March 16, five days after the World Health Organization declared the novel coronavirus a pandemic, Larry Kudlow — the one-time cable news talker turned top economic advisor to President Donald Trump — was in the Senate’s historic Mansfield room, telling a group of senior GOP senators something they didn’t want to hear.

                          The U.S. economy was going to need a lot of help — and fast. Americans faced dire consequences if Congress didn’t act quickly, warned Kudlow, alongside Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin,actingOffice of Management and Budget Director Russ Vought and White House Legislative Affairs Director Eric Ueland.The senators were stunned and dismayed.

                          Ten days later, the price tag for the Senate’s coronavirus economic rescue package has ballooned to more than $2 trillion, twice what Kudlow initially suggested, making it by far the most expensive spending bill in history.
                          ............
                          https://www.politico.com/news/2020/0...=pocket-newtab
                          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                          “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                          Present Current Events are the Future's History

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by TactiKill J. View Post
                            Coronavirus vs every epidemic since 2000



                            Chart clearly shows that nothing else has been comparable.
                            Link ?
                            URL ?
                            What chart ?

                            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                            “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                            Present Current Events are the Future's History

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by G David Bock View Post

                              Link ?
                              URL ?
                              What chart ?

                              I don't know how to get videos to work here. They show up on my end. The video shows that COVID is the worst pandemic in the past 20 years.

                              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4no...ture=emb_title
                              "Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."
                              - Benjamin Franklin

                              The new right wing: hate Muslims, preaches tolerance for Nazis.

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