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  • And some think Trump is bad ...

    Everyone loved George Washington, until he became president
    ...

    When the great Gen. George Washington left his comfortable retirement at Mount Vernon to become the first president of the United States, well-wishers threw flowers at his feet. For hundreds of miles, as he made his way to the temporary capital in New York City, thousands of people followed alongside with blessings, toasts and cheers. Once he was in New York, there was a fireworks show.

    Seven years later, toward the end of his second term, he was so disliked that the House voted against adjourning for 30 minutes to wish him well on his birthday.

    Nowadays, Washington’s birthday is officially recognized, but when he was alive, his legacy was very nearly ruined by his presidency. Historian Alexis Coe describes how and why in her new book, “You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington.”

    It cannot be overstated how much Washington did not want to be president. Years before, he had been so excited to be general at the beginning of the Revolutionary War that he showed up to the Second Continental Congress in uniform. It wasn’t so with the presidency. When news of his election reached him in the spring of 1789, he told Henry Knox, “My movements to the chair of Government will be accompanied with feelings not unlike those of a culprit who is going to the place of his execution.”
    ...
    The first big problem was how frequently he was caught in the middle of infighting between the two nascent political parties, the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans. His Cabinet members were split between the two, and the infighting did not stay behind closed doors. Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson funded a newspaper that criticized Washington’s every move, while Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton wrote under a pseudonym for a pro-Washington paper.

    Long before MSNBC vs. Fox News, it was the National Gazette vs. the Gazette of the United States. “Neither publication bothered with the pretense of objectivity,” Coe writes. No articles “were fact-checked, and everything, including personal lives, was fair game.”

    Although Washington never declared a party affiliation, only Federalists remained in his administration in his second term.

    And that second term, which he had to be persuaded to even bother with, was when things got really bad.

    Great Britain and France were at war, and both empires wanted the United States to side with them. At the same time, tensions between the United States and Britain were rising because Britain still had not withdrawn from forts it had agreed to vacate at the end of the Revolutionary War, and it was seizing American ships and sailors bound for France.
    ...
    Then there was the Whiskey Rebellion debacle. To pay back foreign debt, Hamilton had proposed a tax on whiskey from Kentucky and western Pennsylvania. Distillers worried it would decrease sales and thought it was unfair that they take on the burden for the whole country.
    ...
    “In an extraordinary show of executive overreach,” Coe writes, Washington called the state militia to federal service. He showed up in Pittsburgh in a military uniform to lead the charge against the tax opponents, becoming “the first and only president to take up arms against his own citizens.”

    But there was no confrontation. Washington thought the better of it and returned to Philadelphia. When two insurrectionists were convicted of treason, he pardoned them, but the damage to his reputation had been done.

    Coe includes a chart in her book of what other Founders said about Washington before his presidency and after. The difference is shocking.
    ...
    John Adams in 1785: “I glory in the character of Washington because I know him to be an exemplification of the American character.”

    John Adams in 1812: “Too illiterate, unlearned, unread for his station and reputation.” (Washington was largely self-taught but not illiterate or unlearned.)

    And here’s Thomas Paine in a letter to Washington in 1779: “I shall never suffer a hint of dishonor or even a deficiency of respect to you to pass unnoticed.”

    And in 1796: “The world will be puzzled to decide whether you are an apostate or an impostor; whether you have abandoned good principles, or whether you ever had any.”
    ...
    Washington delivered a final address to Congress in December 1796, three months before he officially left office. Andrew Jackson, a freshman congressman at the time, was in the audience. The future president refused to applaud.
    ...
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/histo...=pocket-newtab
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

  • #2
    Copy / pasting articles that require a subscription to view.
    "Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."
    - Benjamin Franklin

    The new right wing: hate Muslims, preaches tolerance for Nazis.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
      Although Washington never declared a party affiliation, only Federalists remained in his administration in his second term.
      Were they ousted? Voluntary abstention? Boycott? The reason matters.
      Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
      Washington delivered a final address to Congress in December 1796, three months before he officially left office. Andrew Jackson, a freshman congressman at the time, was in the audience. The future president refused to applaud.
      ...
      https://www.washingtonpost.com/histo...=pocket-newtab
      Did Jackson tear up a copy of the speech?
      ScenShare Guidelines:

      1) Enjoy creating it
      2) Enjoy playing it
      3) Enjoy sharing it
      4) Enjoy helping others create them

      The PlayersDB - The Harpoon Community's #1 Choice.

      FAQ http://www.harplonkhq.com/Harpoon/Fr...dQuestions.htm

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by TactiKill J. View Post
        Copy / pasting articles that require a subscription to view.
        Well, I haven't paid for a sub. Linked work for me ...
        Try this about the book which the article supposedly is based on;
        https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/07...02a6fe87ad8967
        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Herman Hum View Post
          Were they ousted? Voluntary abstention? Boycott? The reason matters.

          Did Jackson tear up a copy of the speech?
          Don't recall the article going into that detail. May have to get the book, buy or from your library ... or research somewhere ...
          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by G David Bock View Post

            Well, I haven't paid for a sub. Linked work for me ...
            Try this about the book which the article supposedly is based on;
            https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/07...02a6fe87ad8967
            I think they allow you to view one article per day or week, I forget which. It's copyright infringement to past those articles.

            Anyway, even though I'm no fan of Washington, it's ridiculous to try and compare him to Trump.
            "Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."
            - Benjamin Franklin

            The new right wing: hate Muslims, preaches tolerance for Nazis.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by TactiKill J. View Post

              I think they allow you to view one article per day or week, I forget which. It's copyright infringement to past those articles.

              Anyway, even though I'm no fan of Washington, it's ridiculous to try and compare him to Trump.
              Which is why I do excerpts.
              Tell that to the author.
              I find it interesting how little USA politics have changed in @230+ years and how thankless being a POTUS often is.
              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

              Comment


              • #8
                So often the perfect is the enemy of the good. I'm tired of people with so little practical experience or common sense as to maintained their idealism to the point of absurdity. No Washington wasn't perfect and I doubt I would have voted for him but was there a better choice?
                We hunt the hunters

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by TactiKill J. View Post

                  I think they allow you to view one article per day or week, I forget which. It's copyright infringement to past those articles.

                  Anyway, even though I'm no fan of Washington, it's ridiculous to try and compare him to Trump.
                  You only get 4 free articles per month in no particular order. But any paywall that allows a limited amount of reads can be bypassed, although all your ad blockers and protections will be not functioning,
                  Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                  Prayers.

                  BoRG

                  http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Herman Hum View Post
                    Were they ousted? Voluntary abstention? Boycott? The reason matters.

                    :
                    By 1792 the split into two political parties had occurred. Those opposed to Washington (and Federalism) became members of the opposition party.

                    FWIW, John Adams was a bitter spiteful man with an ego nearly unmatched among his contemporaries (it was he that was not liked much at all by anybody). He was angry (and his letters show it) that Washington was the Great American Hero, and NOT himself. He lost the 1800 election largely because he spent nearly his entire administration warring against the Washingtonites (e.g. Hamilton, Pickering, McHenry etc).

                    The time was pretty rough. When the Whig party split in two, each side saw the other as a traitor, and many saw Washington as the leader of traitors. However the reverse was true as well. That said, the nation as a whole worshipped Washington, and even those that disliked him had to be generally quiet about it lest they lose an election.

                    As for the OP and the author that was posted, the guy is just trying to sell a book, and that always ought to be born in mind.

                    P.s. Having read thousands of Washington's letters, and hundreds of Adams' I am of the opinion Washington was the more literate of the two.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by G David Bock View Post

                      Well, I haven't paid for a sub. Linked work for me ...
                      Try this about the book which the article supposedly is based on;
                      https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/07...02a6fe87ad8967
                      And and interesting read.

                      Thanks!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                        Everyone loved George Washington, until he became president
                        ...

                        When the great Gen. George Washington left his comfortable retirement at Mount Vernon to become the first president of the United States, well-wishers threw flowers at his feet. For hundreds of miles, as he made his way to the temporary capital in New York City, thousands of people followed alongside with blessings, toasts and cheers. Once he was in New York, there was a fireworks show.

                        Seven years later, toward the end of his second term, he was so disliked that the House voted against adjourning for 30 minutes to wish him well on his birthday.

                        Nowadays, Washington’s birthday is officially recognized, but when he was alive, his legacy was very nearly ruined by his presidency. Historian Alexis Coe describes how and why in her new book, “You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington.”

                        It cannot be overstated how much Washington did not want to be president. Years before, he had been so excited to be general at the beginning of the Revolutionary War that he showed up to the Second Continental Congress in uniform. It wasn’t so with the presidency. When news of his election reached him in the spring of 1789, he told Henry Knox, “My movements to the chair of Government will be accompanied with feelings not unlike those of a culprit who is going to the place of his execution.”
                        ...
                        The first big problem was how frequently he was caught in the middle of infighting between the two nascent political parties, the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans. His Cabinet members were split between the two, and the infighting did not stay behind closed doors. Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson funded a newspaper that criticized Washington’s every move, while Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton wrote under a pseudonym for a pro-Washington paper.

                        Long before MSNBC vs. Fox News, it was the National Gazette vs. the Gazette of the United States. “Neither publication bothered with the pretense of objectivity,” Coe writes. No articles “were fact-checked, and everything, including personal lives, was fair game.”

                        Although Washington never declared a party affiliation, only Federalists remained in his administration in his second term.

                        And that second term, which he had to be persuaded to even bother with, was when things got really bad.

                        Great Britain and France were at war, and both empires wanted the United States to side with them. At the same time, tensions between the United States and Britain were rising because Britain still had not withdrawn from forts it had agreed to vacate at the end of the Revolutionary War, and it was seizing American ships and sailors bound for France.
                        ...
                        Then there was the Whiskey Rebellion debacle. To pay back foreign debt, Hamilton had proposed a tax on whiskey from Kentucky and western Pennsylvania. Distillers worried it would decrease sales and thought it was unfair that they take on the burden for the whole country.
                        ...
                        “In an extraordinary show of executive overreach,” Coe writes, Washington called the state militia to federal service. He showed up in Pittsburgh in a military uniform to lead the charge against the tax opponents, becoming “the first and only president to take up arms against his own citizens.”

                        But there was no confrontation. Washington thought the better of it and returned to Philadelphia. When two insurrectionists were convicted of treason, he pardoned them, but the damage to his reputation had been done.

                        Coe includes a chart in her book of what other Founders said about Washington before his presidency and after. The difference is shocking.
                        ...
                        John Adams in 1785: “I glory in the character of Washington because I know him to be an exemplification of the American character.”

                        John Adams in 1812: “Too illiterate, unlearned, unread for his station and reputation.” (Washington was largely self-taught but not illiterate or unlearned.)

                        And here’s Thomas Paine in a letter to Washington in 1779: “I shall never suffer a hint of dishonor or even a deficiency of respect to you to pass unnoticed.”

                        And in 1796: “The world will be puzzled to decide whether you are an apostate or an impostor; whether you have abandoned good principles, or whether you ever had any.”
                        ...
                        Washington delivered a final address to Congress in December 1796, three months before he officially left office. Andrew Jackson, a freshman congressman at the time, was in the audience. The future president refused to applaud.
                        ...
                        https://www.washingtonpost.com/histo...=pocket-newtab
                        Perhaps you should actually read Coe's book...?
                        We are not now that strength which in old days
                        Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                        Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                        To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Tuebor View Post

                          By 1792 the split into two political parties had occurred. Those opposed to Washington (and Federalism) became members of the opposition party.

                          FWIW, John Adams was a bitter spiteful man with an ego nearly unmatched among his contemporaries (it was he that was not liked much at all by anybody). He was angry (and his letters show it) that Washington was the Great American Hero, and NOT himself. He lost the 1800 election largely because he spent nearly his entire administration warring against the Washingtonites (e.g. Hamilton, Pickering, McHenry etc).

                          The time was pretty rough. When the Whig party split in two, each side saw the other as a traitor, and many saw Washington as the leader of traitors. However the reverse was true as well. That said, the nation as a whole worshipped Washington, and even those that disliked him had to be generally quiet about it lest they lose an election.

                          As for the OP and the author that was posted, the guy is just trying to sell a book, and that always ought to be born in mind.

                          P.s. Having read thousands of Washington's letters, and hundreds of Adams' I am of the opinion Washington was the more literate of the two.
                          John Adams was a tough talking fellow who ha the thankless task of putting the economy, and the financial system back on the rails, in the face of the dreamers who believed that the continental paper notes should be somehow redeemed at face value, with interest..

                          this may sound familiar.
                          The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

                          Comment

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