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Massena's Trump Files III

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  • Massena
    replied
    ...or just delusions...Trump claims powers he just doesn't have...

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...cid=spartandhp

    As he battles the coronavirus pandemic, President Donald Trump has been claiming extraordinarily sweeping powers that legal scholars say the president simply doesn't have. And he has repeatedly refusing to spell out the legal basis for those powers.

    “It's not that the president does't have a remarkable amount of power to respond to a public health crisis. It’s that these are not the powers he has," said Stephen Vladeck, a University of Texas School of Law professor who specializes in constitutional and national security law.

    First it was Trump's assertion that he could force governors to reopen their economies before they felt ready. “When somebody’s the president of the United States, the authority is total,” he claimed.

    Trump soon dropped the threat, saying he would instead leave such decisions to the states. But he has revived the idea in recent days as he has tried to pressure governors to allow churches and other places of worship to hold in-person services, even where stay-at-home orders and other limits on large gatherings remain in effect.

    Asked Tuesday what authority he had to enforce such a mandate, Trump was cagey.

    “I can absolutely do it if I want to," he said. "We have many different ways where I can override them and if I have to, I’ll do that.”

    The White House declined to spell out any specific statute, but White House spokesman Judd Deere said in a statement that “every decision the president has made throughout this pandemic has been to protect the health and safety of the American people.”

    Leave a comment:


  • Massena
    commented on 's reply
    More whining from Trump: I guess that Trump really doesn't understand the Constitution.

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/05/27/polit...ate/index.html


    President Donald Trump on Wednesday threatened to "strongly regulate" or even shut down social media platforms after Twitter applied a fact-check to two of his tweets this week.


    Trump did not elaborate on what actions he could take. But the threat is Trump's clearest expression of intent to use the power of government to target his perceived political enemies in the private sector -- businesses that already enjoy wide latitude under the law to moderate their platforms as they see fit. And it raises the stakes for Twitter and Facebook as they grapple with Trump's misleading claims about mail-in voting and his baseless insinuations that a cable TV news host had a hand in an aide's death decades ago.

    "Republicans feel that Social Media Platforms totally silence conservatives voices. We will strongly regulate, or close them down, before we can ever allow this to happen," Trump tweeted Wednesday. He went on to accuse the tech industry of trying to interfere in the 2016 election, before repeating an unfounded claim about voter fraud stemming from mail-in ballots.

    "We can't let large scale Mail-In Ballots take root in our Country," Trump tweeted. "It would be a free for all on cheating, forgery and the theft of Ballots. Whoever cheated the most would win. Likewise, Social Media. Clean up your act, NOW!!!!"
    Facebook and Twitter declined to comment Wednesday.

    Later Wednesday morning, Trump teased a "big action" regarding social media but declined to elaborate on what that could be.
    Trump's Twitter outburst followed an unprecedented decision by the platform on Tuesday evening to apply a fact-checking label to Trump's content for the first time.


  • Massena
    replied
    Poor baby...emphasis on 'baby'...I guess he's taking his 'tweets' and going home...

    President Donald Trump is threatening to "strongly regulate" or "close down" social media platforms a day after Twitter added a "fact check" label to two of his tweets about mail-in ballots.

    After tweeting Tuesday that "Twitter is now interfering in the 2020 Presidential Election" and "stifling FREE SPEECH," Trump initially tweeted again Wednesday about social media platforms without specifically naming Twitter, which has been his favorite platform to post unfiltered views to his millions of followers.

    Asserting that "Republicans feel that Social Media Platforms totally silence conservatives voices," Trump tweeted, "We will strongly regulate, or close them down, before we can ever allow this to happen."

    Leave a comment:


  • Massena
    replied
    France has rejected Trump's favorite anti-malaria drug:

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/hea...cid=spartandhp
    Hydroxychloroquine, the old malaria medicine touted as a treatment for Covid-19, can no longer be used to treat the new coronavirus in France amid growing evidence that it can cause more harm than good.

    Leave a comment:


  • Massena
    commented on 's reply
    In a new development, Twitter has added fact-checking to Trump's tweets:

    https://news.yahoo.com/widower-delet...l&uh_test=1_02

    For the first time, Twitter has flagged some of President Donald Trump's tweets with a fact-check warning.

    On Tuesday, Twitter added a warning phrase to two Trump tweets that called mail-in ballots “fraudulent” and predicted that “mail boxes will be robbed,” among other things. Under the tweets, there is now a link reading “Get the facts about mail-in ballots” that guides users to a Twitter “moments” page with fact checks and news stories about Trump’s unsubstantiated claims.

    Until now, the president has simply blown past Twitter’s half-hearted attempts to enforce rules intended to promote civility and “healthy” conversation on its most prominent user. Trump frequently amplifies misinformation, spreads abuse and uses his pulpit to personally attack private citizens and public figures alike — all forbidden under Twitter's official rules.

    In a statement, Twitter said Trump's vote-by-mail tweets “contain potentially misleading information about voting processes and have been labeled to provide additional context around mail-in ballots.”

    Trump has never previously faced Twitter sanctions on his account. The husband of a woman who died by accident two decades ago in an office of then-GOP Rep. Joe Scarborough recently demanded that Twitter remove the president’s baseless tweets suggesting that Scarborough, now a fierce Trump critic, killed her. Twitter issued a statement expressing its regret to the husband but so far has taken no action on those tweets.

  • Massena
    replied
    The following article also appeared in The Atlantic:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/politics...licans/612007/
    In the future museumof Never Trumpers turned Ever Trumpers, Senator Cory Gardner of Colorado will have pride of place. In 2016, Gardner called Donald Trump a “buffoon,” left the Republican National Convention after one day rather than watching him formally receive the party’s nomination, called for him to drop out of the race after the release of the Access Hollywood
    tape, and said he would write in Mike Pence’s name on his presidential ballot.

    Now Gardner, perhaps the Senate’s most endangered Republican incumbent, is locked in an uphill battle for reelection in a state trending bluer by the day. He trails his probable Democratic opponent, the former governor and erstwhile presidential candidate John Hickenlooper, by double digits in the polls. In a sharp about-face, Gardner has backed Trump at every turn since endorsing the president for reelection last year.

    “He’s been with us 100 percent,” Trump said of Gardner at a February rally in Colorado Springs, at which Gardner lavished praise on the president.

    What happened?

    Not so long ago, there was a time in American politics when elected officials who found their state’s voters shifting beneath them would adjust their partisan loyalties to stay in power. Former Senators James Jeffords of Vermont and Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania both left the Republican Party when its national agenda grew out of step with that of their voters. A generation of southern politicians, from George Wallace to Strom Thurmond, adapted its stances on race as black voters’ access to the ballot box rose.

    Leave a comment:


  • Massena
    replied
    The following article by Peter Wehner has been published in The Atlantic. One of the author's more pointed comments in the article is '
    He is a crimson stain on American decency. ' And that is an accurate assessment.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/ar...-trump/612097/

    “I’m asking you to intervene in this instance because the President of the United States has taken something that does not belong to him—the memory of my dead wife—and perverted it for perceived political gain.”

    There may be a more damning thing that’s been said about an American president, but none immediately comes to mind.

    This sentence is from a heartbreaking May 21 letter written by Timothy Klausutis to Jack Dorsey, the CEO of Twitter, asking Dorsey to delete a series of tweets by Donald Trump. Klausutis is the widower of Lori Kaye Klausutis, who died nearly 20 years ago. (Timothy Klausutis, who never remarried, still lives in the house he shared with his wife.) The autopsy conducted at the time of Lori’s death confirmed that it was an accident; she had fainted as the result of a heart condition, hitting her head on a desk. There’s not a thimble of evidence of foul play.


    Leave a comment:


  • Massena
    replied
    The unemployment rate is the worst since the Great Depression...and that isn't the only major problem.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/mark...cid=spartandhp

    The coronavirus pandemic choked the longest economic expansion on record, with states' stay-at-home orders putting the U.S. economy into a self-induced coma. As restaurants, bars, retailers, gyms and theaters closed to keep as many people home as possible, tens of millions lost their jobs, and unemployment surged to the highest levels since the Great Depression.

    It's a glimpse into how contagious recessions can be - perhaps just as much as the coronavirus that caused it.

    "It's a domino effect: The longer this goes on, the cracks get a bit bigger," says Samantha Azzarello, global market strategist at J.P. Morgan Asset Management. "The policy response to COVID-19 is what caused the actual recession. It was a policy choice to shut down the economy. We're getting hit all at once now."

    Here's what's happening in the U.S. economy right now - and how the coronavirus crisis is making or breaking it, based on these important measures.

    Leave a comment:


  • Massena
    commented on 's reply
    This time the president makes false accusations and other grievous errors in the Rose Garden. Once again, Trump has proven that common sense is not a common virtue. The terrible thing about this, in addition that it is 'bearing false witness' is that his minions will continue to believe it.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...cid=spartandhp

    President Trump smeared a prominent television host on Tuesday from the lectern in the Rose Garden with an unfounded allegation of murder, taking the politics of rage and conspiracy theory to a new level even as much of the political world barely took notice.

    In an attack that once would have been unthinkable for a sitting president, Mr. Trump all but accused Joe Scarborough, a former Republican congressman who now hosts the MSNBC show “Morning Joe,” of killing a staff member in 2001 even though he was 800 miles away at the time and the police ruled her death an accident.
    The president’s charge amplified a series of Twitter messages in recent days that have drawn almost no rebukes from fellow Republicans eager to look the other way but have anguished the family of Lori Klausutis, who died when she suffered a heart condition that caused her to fall and hit her head on a desk. Mr. Trump doubled down on the false accusation even after Timothy Klausutis pleaded unsuccessfully with Twitter to take down the posts about his late wife because they were causing her family such deep pain.

  • Massena
    replied
    Trump continues to make a jackass out of himself...

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/05/26/polit...sks/index.html


    Joe Biden called President Donald Trump "an absolute fool" on Tuesday for sharing a tweet that mocked the former vice president for wearing a mask Monday at a Memorial Day ceremony.


    In an interview with CNN's Dana Bash in Delaware -- Biden's first in-person interview since being knocked off the campaign trail by the coronavirus pandemic -- the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee said Trump is fueling a cultural opposition to wearing masks when "every leading doc in the world is saying we should wear a mask when you're in a crowd."

    "This macho stuff, for a guy -- I shouldn't get going, but it just, it costs people's lives. It's costing people's lives," Biden said. Trump's position amounts to "stoking deaths," he said.

    He added: "Presidents are supposed to lead, not engage in folly and be falsely masculine."

    Leave a comment:


  • pamak
    commented on 's reply
    Originally posted by Trung Si View Post

    Yes I am sure, by mail only if you are in some way incapacitated or out of the country.
    Or be over 65 years old as the official site of the TX Secretary of State says.


  • Trung Si
    commented on 's reply
    Originally posted by pamak View Post



    Are you sure about that?

    https://www.sos.texas.gov/elections/voter/reqabbm.shtml

    Application for a Ballot by Mail


    To be eligible to vote early by mail in Texas, you must:
    • be 65 years or older;
    • be disabled;
    • be out of the county on election day and during the period for early voting by personal appearance; or
    • be confined in jail, but otherwise eligible.
    Yes I am sure, by mail only if you are in some way incapacitated or out of the country.

  • pamak
    commented on 's reply
    Originally posted by Trung Si View Post
    If it will be by Mail, I know it will be rigged and I know who will win, thank God here in Texas one has to show up in person!


    Are you sure about that?

    https://www.sos.texas.gov/elections/voter/reqabbm.shtml

    Application for a Ballot by Mail


    To be eligible to vote early by mail in Texas, you must:
    • be 65 years or older;
    • be disabled;
    • be out of the county on election day and during the period for early voting by personal appearance; or
    • be confined in jail, but otherwise eligible.

  • pamak
    commented on 's reply
    Originally posted by Jose50 View Post

    Right. So...where's your evidence that it wouldn't or couldn't happen?
    The burden of proof is on your side. What we know from multiple states, including conservative ones, is that they have not produced anything to justify such fear. And by the way, all states have some form of either mail vote or absentee ballot.

    Here is one from TX

    https://www.sos.texas.gov/elections/voter/reqabbm.shtml


  • pamak
    commented on 's reply
    Originally posted by Jose50 View Post
    There is just too much of a chance for fraud with an election by mail.
    No, there is not if it is set properly.

    My wife votes by mail and as a registered voter she receives a vote form. If for some reason a random guy steals this form, it will be useless to him. First, he will need to know personal details to fill it. Then even if he does fill the form and sends it to the state, a red alarm in the state system will be triggered when my wife will get another form and vote.

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