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U.S. officials failed to tell the truth about the war in Afghanistan

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  • U.S. officials failed to tell the truth about the war in Afghanistan

    Not that we should be surprised that political leaders manipulated our outrage over 9/11 and our sense of patriotism to waste lives and tax payers a fortune, we've seen this dog and pony show played out before.
    If Congress had been doing it's job, these should never have happened, but as more of these documents surface there will be plenty of finger pointing to go around.

    A confidential trove of government documents obtained by The Washington Post reveals that senior U.S. officials failed to tell the truth about the war in Afghanistan throughout the 18-year campaign, making rosy pronouncements they knew to be false and hiding unmistakable evidence the war had become unwinnable.

    The documents were generated by a federal project examining the root failures of the longest armed conflict in U.S. history. They include more than 2,000 pages of previously unpublished notes of interviews with people who played a direct role in the war, from generals and diplomats to aid workers and Afghan officials.
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...tan/ar-BBXY8l1
    Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
    Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

  • #2
    Great. So what happens now? Some one(s) going to be held accountable? Anyone going to jail?

    Nope. Then why be surprised when it happens again?
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    • #3
      After 5 years of US occupation, Japan and Germany were socially reformed, had functional republics and were making lots of useful things instead of destructive things.

      After 20 years, nothing in Afghanistan has changed, I think it is safe to say that nothing ever will. .

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      • #4
        I still think we should sent tens of thousands of inmates in our prisons there and let them do as they please. They'd be easier to deal with as they speak English, know what indoor plumbing is and want it, and are greedy as all get out.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Phaing View Post
          After 5 years of US occupation, Japan and Germany were socially reformed, had functional republics and were making lots of useful things instead of destructive things.

          After 20 years, nothing in Afghanistan has changed, I think it is safe to say that nothing ever will. .
          "Twenty Years ". Read your history .... The Brits were there for nearly 100 years and the only thing they left behind was soldiers graves.....The same thing will be left when the last US and Allied soldier leaves that god forsaken spot..... to the "Grunts" who paid the price for political vanity...

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          • #6
            When, and if, there is any hearings, or special investigations, I want to see the money trail, so many companies linked directly to politicians in very powerful positions received billion dollar contracts, Haliburton is just one, Hillstone 1.2 billion (James Biden)
            The Carlyle Group and Tutor Perini two companies that Feinstein's husband owns controlling interest in, all received very well paid military contracts to build facilities in Iraq and Afghanistan.
            All while it was well known by two administrations Bush Jr. and Obama, that the war was not winnable, The people who mislead the public, and used the opportunity to enrichen themselves and family members should be held responsible.
            Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
            Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

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            • #7
              I think America meant well when we went to Afghanistan, Vietnam, and Iraq. When things bog down in these places, I wonder why we don't win like in World War Two? We kicked Iraq out of Kuwait. I think Ho Chi Minh said something like, for every ten soldiers of mine that you kill, I will kill one of yours and win. No matter what we did to them, they would show up the next day to fight us. Just like George Washington did against the British. He lost many battles but never gave up. I think I heard once that our enemies know that the longer a war goes, Americans lose the will to fight. If that's true, how are we supposed to beat people like that?
              "Advances in technology tend to overwhelm me."

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              • #8
                Its worse than you think. Try googling opium production Afghanistan. Yep, Air America again.
                Credo quia absurdum.


                Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Slug View Post
                  I think America meant well when we went to Afghanistan, Vietnam, and Iraq. When things bog down in these places, I wonder why we don't win like in World War Two? We kicked Iraq out of Kuwait. I think Ho Chi Minh said something like, for every ten soldiers of mine that you kill, I will kill one of yours and win. No matter what we did to them, they would show up the next day to fight us. Just like George Washington did against the British. He lost many battles but never gave up. I think I heard once that our enemies know that the longer a war goes, Americans lose the will to fight. If that's true, how are we supposed to beat people like that?
                  Either America wins the peace right away or they stay and fail because the voters who support those wars in the beginning lose interest when things don’t go right.

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                  • #10
                    In Washington's time it was about independence, today it's all about money.
                    The soldiers dedication and patriotism is not in question here, the support of the citizens for the soldiers is genuine,.
                    What's in question is the back room deal's, follow the money, war is big money and that seems to be the driving force behind the decision to keep our forces there.

                    Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                    Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
                      What's in question is the back room deal's, follow the money, war is big money and that seems to be the driving force behind the decision to keep our forces there.
                      Is that the military industrial complex Eisenhower warned us about? If it is, and it's causing serious problems in our wars, how do we stop it? How would the war in Afganistan be different right now?
                      "Advances in technology tend to overwhelm me."

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
                        Not that we should be surprised that political leaders manipulated our outrage over 9/11 and our sense of patriotism to waste lives and tax payers a fortune, we've seen this dog and pony show played out before.
                        If Congress had been doing it's job, these should never have happened, but as more of these documents surface there will be plenty of finger pointing to go around.



                        https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...tan/ar-BBXY8l1
                        I agree with the main premise of the OP but I have two question on the subject:


                        1 To my knowledge, the documents do not reveal the names of the sources. So, why people (including those who do not trust the liberal media) are willing to accept the WaPo claim? Imagine for example if the criticism about the lack of progress came from a president's "deep state" political opponents.


                        2. How can one draw a line (and there SHOULD be one IMO) between a permissible lie that misrepresents reality and a lie that is not permissible? All governments in war are engaged in some form of domestic propaganda in which they try to convince their citizens that things are under control and that there are no significant setbacks. Should we demand that we have the right to hear the unfiltered truth every time as it is?
                        My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Phaing View Post
                          After 5 years of US occupation, Japan and Germany were socially reformed, had functional republics and were making lots of useful things instead of destructive things.

                          After 20 years, nothing in Afghanistan has changed, I think it is safe to say that nothing ever will. .
                          But when the Soviet union and communism took on Afghanistan there were real changes. Overnight education numbers went through the roof, only to be reversed when the Taliban took power in the 1990s

                          The current US president wants to negotiate with the Taliban that’s completely unacceptable and Afghan people don’t want that.

                          Have Israel or Saudi Arabia use their troops perhaps to help out Afghanistan. Point is we have to mix things up. Where there is a will there is a way and there is some sort of way to make Afghanistan better.
                          Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
                          Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

                          George S Patton

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Slug View Post
                            Is that the military industrial complex Eisenhower warned us about? If it is, and it's causing serious problems in our wars, how do we stop it? How would the war in Afganistan be different right now?
                            I believe it is exactly what Ike warned us of.
                            Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                            Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by pamak View Post

                              I agree with the main premise of the OP but I have two question on the subject:


                              1 To my knowledge, the documents do not reveal the names of the sources. So, why people (including those who do not trust the liberal media) are willing to accept the WaPo claim? Imagine for example if the criticism about the lack of progress came from a president's "deep state" political opponents.


                              2. How can one draw a line (and there SHOULD be one IMO) between a permissible lie that misrepresents reality and a lie that is not permissible? All governments in war are engaged in some form of domestic propaganda in which they try to convince their citizens that things are under control and that there are no significant setbacks. Should we demand that we have the right to hear the unfiltered truth every time as it is?
                              I think this link will give us a better picture of the depth of the situation, there is an video interview with the investigator general in charge of the investigation into the war which has been on going since 2014,

                              https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...Cdg?li=BBnb7Kz
                              Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                              Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

                              Comment

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