Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How much Tarrants are among us

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How much Tarrants are among us

    Look at this guys story. Ex marine with big carrer. After years and years of education through movies such as Rambo, i ask myself was there really a plan to make a generation of this kind of people. " Stopped counting after 26th victim..."


    https://youtu.be/C0EcbyIF9QM

    Even I was into Rambo III scenario when he fought commies in Afghanistan

  • #2
    Originally posted by Daud View Post
    Look at this guys story. Ex marine with big carrer. After years and years of education through movies such as Rambo, i ask myself was there really a plan to make a generation of this kind of people. " Stopped counting after 26th victim..."


    https://youtu.be/C0EcbyIF9QM

    Even I was into Rambo III scenario when he fought commies in Afghanistan
    Oh please. I used to be a B-52g crew chief and my biggest worry was that I was called to do my duty. My weapon? The AGM-69 SRAM. (Or as we called it 'the dial a nuke.')
    AGM-69A SRAM


    The requirement for the weapon was issued by the Strategic Air Command in 1964, and the resultant AGM-69A SRAM contract was awarded to Boeing in 1966.[1] After delays and technical flaws during testing,[2] it was ordered into full production in 1971 and entered service in August 1972.[3] It was carried by the B-52, FB-111A, and, for a very short period starting in 1986, by B-1Bs based at Dyess AFB in Texas. SRAMs were also carried by the B-1Bs based at Ellsworth AFB in South Dakota, Grand Forks AFB in North Dakota, and McConnell AFB in Kansas up until late 1993.

    SRAM had an inertial navigation system as well as a radar altimeter which enabled the missile to be launched in either a semi-ballistic or terrain-following flight path. The SRAM was also capable of performing one "major maneuver" during its flight which gave the missile the capability of reversing its course and attacking targets that were behind it, sometimes called an "over-the-shoulder" launch. The missile had a circular error probable (CEP) of about 1,400 feet (430 m) and a maximum range of 110 nautical miles (200 km). The SRAM used a single W69 nuclear warhead with a variable yield of 17 kilotons as a fission weapon, or 210 kilotons as a fusion weapon with tritium boost enabled. The aircrew could turn a switch on the Class III command to select the destructive yield required.

    It even had a 'James Bond' feature. The over the shoulder was a air to air usage.
    Credo quia absurdum.


    Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Bwaha View Post

      Oh please. I used to be a B-52g crew chief and my biggest worry was that I was called to do my duty. My weapon? The AGM-69 SRAM. (Or as we called it 'the dial a nuke.')
      AGM-69A SRAM


      The requirement for the weapon was issued by the Strategic Air Command in 1964, and the resultant AGM-69A SRAM contract was awarded to Boeing in 1966.[SUP]

      It even had a 'James Bond' feature. The over the shoulder was a air to air usage.
      The muslim counterpart is two anti-tank mines strapped to a goat.
      Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bwaha View Post

        Oh please. I used to be a B-52g crew chief and my biggest worry was that I was called to do my duty. My weapon? The AGM-69 SRAM. (Or as we called it 'the dial a nuke.')
        AGM-69A SRAM


        The requirement for the weapon was issued by the Strategic Air Command in 1964, and the resultant AGM-69A SRAM contract was awarded to Boeing in 1966.[1] After delays and technical flaws during testing,[2] it was ordered into full production in 1971 and entered service in August 1972.[3] It was carried by the B-52, FB-111A, and, for a very short period starting in 1986, by B-1Bs based at Dyess AFB in Texas. SRAMs were also carried by the B-1Bs based at Ellsworth AFB in South Dakota, Grand Forks AFB in North Dakota, and McConnell AFB in Kansas up until late 1993.

        SRAM had an inertial navigation system as well as a radar altimeter which enabled the missile to be launched in either a semi-ballistic or terrain-following flight path. The SRAM was also capable of performing one "major maneuver" during its flight which gave the missile the capability of reversing its course and attacking targets that were behind it, sometimes called an "over-the-shoulder" launch. The missile had a circular error probable (CEP) of about 1,400 feet (430 m) and a maximum range of 110 nautical miles (200 km). The SRAM used a single W69 nuclear warhead with a variable yield of 17 kilotons as a fission weapon, or 210 kilotons as a fusion weapon with tritium boost enabled. The aircrew could turn a switch on the Class III command to select the destructive yield required.

        It even had a 'James Bond' feature. The over the shoulder was a air to air usage.

        How much costs production of 1 ?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Daud View Post

          How much costs production of 1 ?
          We have 1500 in stockpile, but it was withdrawn from service (but still usable) in 1993.

          It's replacement, the AGM-86, is a better performer; the latest models costs $1 million each, and can wreck a good-sized city. We aren't buying new ones, since the AG-158 is coming on line to replace it.

          Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Daud View Post


            How much costs production of 1 ?
            'About 1,500 missiles were built at a cost of about $592,000 each by the time production ended in 1975'.

            So about a half million each. You really don't understand, we really could blow the crap out of any coalition of states at will. Yet we didn't. We kept the peace. Through Superior Firepower.



            Think about that for a moment. We owned the arsenal with subs and carriers and destroyers all capable of launching nukes. Yet we didn't. We deescalated and removed a bunch of stuff and may reinstall them after this new russian hissy fit.
            Last edited by Bwaha; 29 Mar 19, 03:11.
            Credo quia absurdum.


            Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

            Comment


            • #7
              Amazing. I got info that tomahawk costs 900 000$

              Cant even imagine what will industry 4.0 with all automatisation and AI bring.

              Russians are already in Venezuela
              Last edited by Daud; 29 Mar 19, 03:15.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Daud View Post

                Amazing. I got info that tomahawk costs 900 000$

                Cant even imagine what will industry 4.0 with all automatisation and AI bring.

                Russians are already in Venezuela
                Technology gets cheaper.

                The Russians are barely in Russia.
                Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                Comment


                • #9
                  when Trump ordered attack on one of Assads airports, 59 tomahawks

                  i told myself " what a guy "

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Daud View Post

                    Russians are already in Venezuela
                    People will notice comrade Daud's triumphant tone.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Daud View Post
                      when Trump ordered attack on one of Assads airports, 59 tomahawks

                      i told myself " what a guy "
                      He is.

                      They're cheaper when you buy in bulk, and the non-nuclear ones cost a lot less. And the upgraded versions that have since replaced those 59 are much better.

                      You see, Syria was a live-fire exercise for us. We get to test out weapons and tactics and see actual results on people and infrastructure.

                      We got billions in savings on R&D out of Syria.

                      Saddam, Kaddafi, and Assad tried to go cheap, and their countries are ruined for years, generations for the former and latter.
                      Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Daud View Post
                        when Trump ordered attack on one of Assads airports, 59 tomahawks

                        i told myself " what a guy "
                        One Ohio SSGN can dump about 150 on a busy day.
                        Credo quia absurdum.


                        Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ljadw View Post

                          People will notice comrade Daud's triumphant tone.
                          Decide am i qn Isis supporter or a "comrade" . Cant be both. Tommorrow i ll ba a libtard.

                          You have alot of imaginary enemies i believe

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Daud View Post
                            when Trump ordered attack on one of Assads airports, 59 tomahawks

                            i told myself " what a guy "
                            Daud means, but hides, one of the airports used by the allies of the Hamas terrorists,allies with as HQ Tehran .

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post

                              He is.

                              They're cheaper when you buy in bulk, and the non-nuclear ones cost a lot less. And the upgraded versions that have since replaced those 59 are much better.

                              You see, Syria was a live-fire exercise for us. We get to test out weapons and tactics and see actual results on people and infrastructure.

                              We got billions in savings on R&D out of Syria.

                              Saddam, Kaddafi, and Assad tried to go cheap, and their countries are ruined for years, generations for the former and latter.
                              I fear the bot. Not the Samsung Sentry bot. I'm not going traipsing about the NK/ SK border. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qQHVwYL1we4
                              Credo quia absurdum.


                              Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X