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  • What Border?

    https://www.bbc.com/reel/video/p0740...day-every-year
    "Ask not what your country can do for you"

    Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

    you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

  • #2
    No border? Well....in the video it looked like all the Mexican riders had to stop at some sort of fence and show some kind of papers for themselves and also for their horses. I mean, what if one of the horses liked the USA better than Mexico and decided to ask for asylum? Would its Mexican rider be separated from it and put in quarantine and have to wait until a judge decided whether or not to allow the horse to stay? Would the rider have to walk back to Mexico? Inquiring minds want to know.
    Last edited by Jose50; 20 Mar 19, 10:15.
    ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
    IN MARE IN COELO

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Jose50 View Post
      No border? Well....in the video it looked like all the Mexican riders had to stop at some sort of fence and show some kind of papers for themselves and also for their horses. I mean, what if one of the horses liked the USA better than Mexico and decided to ask for asylum? Would its Mexican rider be separated from it and put in quarantine and have to wait until a judge decided whether or not to allow the horse to stay? Would the rider have to walk back to Mexico? Inquiring minds want to know.
      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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      • #4
        Pancho Villa attacks Columbus, New Mexico

        March 9,1916
        ...
        Angered over American support of his rivals for the control of Mexico, the peasant-born revolutionary leader Pancho Villa attacks the border town of Columbus, New Mexico.

        In 1913, a bloody civil war in Mexico brought the ruthless general Victoriano Huerta to power. American President Woodrow Wilson despised the new regime, referring to it as a “government of butchers,” and provided active military support to a challenger, Venustiano Carranza. Unfortunately, when Carranza won power in 1914, he also proved a disappointment and Wilson supported yet another rebel leader, Pancho Villa.

        A wily, peasant-born leader, Villa joined with Emiliano Zapata to keep the spirit of rebellion alive in Mexico and harass the Carranza government. A year later, though, Wilson decided Carranza had made enough steps towards democratic reform to merit official American support, and the president abandoned Villa. Outraged, Villa turned against the United States. In January 1916, he kidnapped 18 Americans from a Mexican train and slaughtered them. A few weeks later, on this day in 1916, Villa led an army of about 1,500 guerillas across the border to stage a brutal raid against the small American town of Columbus, New Mexico. Villa and his men killed 19 people and left the town in flames.
        ...
        ... Though Pershing never captured Villa, his efforts did convince Villa never again to attack American citizens or territory. After helping remove Carranza from power in 1920, Villa agreed to retire from politics. His enemies assassinated him in 1923. The resentment engendered in Mexico by the efforts against PanchoVilla, however, did not fade with his death, and Mexican-American relations remained strained for decades to come.
        ...
        https://www.history.com/this-day-in-...bus-new-mexico

        Nice event to "commemorate" ...
        ... quite the "hero".
        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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        • #5
          More details; Battle of Columbus (1916)

          ...
          The Battle of Columbus (Burning of Columbus or the Columbus Raid), March 9, 1916, began as a raid conducted by Pancho Villa's Division of the North on the small United States border town of Columbus, New Mexico, located 3 miles (4.8 km) north of the border. The raid escalated into a full-scale battle between Villistas and the United States Army. Villa himself led the assault, only to be driven back into Mexico by elements of the 13th Cavalry Regiment stationed at the town. The attack angered Americans and President Woodrow Wilson ordered the Punitive Expedition in which the US Army invaded Mexico in an unsuccessful attempt to capture General Villa.
          ....
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Columbus_(1916)
          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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          • #6
            What in H are you doing slipping history into this form. Don't you know history has been forgotten? Sure seems so.
            "Ask not what your country can do for you"

            Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

            you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
              What in H are you doing slipping history into this form. Don't you know history has been forgotten? Sure seems so.
              Helps to refocus once in a while.
              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                Pancho Villa attacks Columbus, New Mexico

                March 9,1916
                ...
                Angered over American support of his rivals for the control of Mexico, the peasant-born revolutionary leader Pancho Villa attacks the border town of Columbus, New Mexico.

                In 1913, a bloody civil war in Mexico brought the ruthless general Victoriano Huerta to power. American President Woodrow Wilson despised the new regime, referring to it as a “government of butchers,” and provided active military support to a challenger, Venustiano Carranza. Unfortunately, when Carranza won power in 1914, he also proved a disappointment and Wilson supported yet another rebel leader, Pancho Villa.

                A wily, peasant-born leader, Villa joined with Emiliano Zapata to keep the spirit of rebellion alive in Mexico and harass the Carranza government. A year later, though, Wilson decided Carranza had made enough steps towards democratic reform to merit official American support, and the president abandoned Villa. Outraged, Villa turned against the United States. In January 1916, he kidnapped 18 Americans from a Mexican train and slaughtered them. A few weeks later, on this day in 1916, Villa led an army of about 1,500 guerillas across the border to stage a brutal raid against the small American town of Columbus, New Mexico. Villa and his men killed 19 people and left the town in flames.
                ...
                ... Though Pershing never captured Villa, his efforts did convince Villa never again to attack American citizens or territory. After helping remove Carranza from power in 1920, Villa agreed to retire from politics. His enemies assassinated him in 1923. The resentment engendered in Mexico by the efforts against PanchoVilla, however, did not fade with his death, and Mexican-American relations remained strained for decades to come.
                ...
                https://www.history.com/this-day-in-...bus-new-mexico

                Nice event to "commemorate" ...
                ... quite the "hero".
                According to one of Villa' European mercenary officers one intention was to rob the bank to obtain US dollars to pay them.
                Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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