Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Single payer, single payer bla bla bla

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Half Pint John
    started a topic Single payer, single payer bla bla bla

    Single payer, single payer bla bla bla

    Can anybody here tell me just what that is supposed to be?

  • the ace
    replied
    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post

    So, the drug companies hand you your prescription medicine without charge? Or are you conflating the idea that you don't pay but someone else, unseen, does like the government and that you equate that with the drugs being "free?"

    Regardless of what they do in Scotland, if you give blood in the US one of the screening issues is if you have lived in Europe or the UK and had serious medical treatments or transfusions there. I'm not making a judgement call on that, I'm simply stating a fact. Here, those can be reasons to refuse to take you as a donor.
    I can understand that, there are screening question about AIDS and Malaria here too, and you have to report any medical conditions. I pay for prescriptions etc. every month from my wages, as does everybody else. I'm happy to do that in the knowledge that people will get the treatment they need.

    The NHS isn't perfect, I'll admit that, and MM's mother-in-law effectively paying twice for her treatment is a good example. To be fair, if her treatment had been urgent, she wouldn't have had to wait.

    Leave a comment:


  • Massena
    replied
    Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
    Ah, didn't Clinton balance the budget?
    I believe that was the last time the budget was balanced and that was 1994.

    Leave a comment:


  • Half Pint John
    replied
    mad to trust a government that can't even balance a budget.
    Ah, didn't Clinton balance the budget?

    Leave a comment:


  • wolfhnd
    replied
    https://www.pop.org/cancer-survival-...tain-than-u-s/

    I don't trust the statistics when it comes to health care. That said if I had cancer I wouldn't get treatment from the NHS.

    I pay about $8000 a year for me and my wife to have private medical insurance. I had $15,000 worth of dental care over the last 5 years. It is my second largest expense only exceeded by property taxes and other forms of insurance. I'm not happy about it but I'm still not on board with single payer, you would have to be mad to trust a government that can't even balance a budget. The "fresh new faces" in the democratic party doesn't leave you feeling that competency is going to increase any time soon.

    Medical care is pushing 20 percent of GDP. It is a real problem and likely to get worse. What I don't understand however is how it can be rationed in a way people will accept and rationed it must be.

    There is no limit to demand especially as services become more effective and high tech. Replacing many of the service now provided by health care workers with artificial intelligence seems like the best way to contain cost to me. Especially on the diagnostic end. Better diagnostics however will also increase demand. It is a vicious circle.

    Leave a comment:


  • T. A. Gardner
    replied
    Originally posted by the ace View Post
    Oh and @T.A.Gardner ? I'm a blood donor in the UK (Silver Award), here in Scotland I get my prescriptions for free, and I've enough experience with the NHS to be grateful for it. I started giving blood just after the problems you're thinking of, as the screening tests were coming in to make sure this would never happen again.
    So, the drug companies hand you your prescription medicine without charge? Or are you conflating the idea that you don't pay but someone else, unseen, does like the government and that you equate that with the drugs being "free?"

    Regardless of what they do in Scotland, if you give blood in the US one of the screening issues is if you have lived in Europe or the UK and had serious medical treatments or transfusions there. I'm not making a judgement call on that, I'm simply stating a fact. Here, those can be reasons to refuse to take you as a donor.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by the ace View Post

    And it was my Dad's fame that got him a hip replacement, and my Tribune's that got his heart bypass ? Not to mention a friend who has to attend dialysis sessions three times a week. The whole point about the NHS is that everybody, not just the rich, pays. Everybody owns the hospital, and everybody gets the treatment they need. People go privately (using NHS trained staff) to cut down on waiting times, true enough. But people who need treatment get it.

    Oh and @T.A.Gardner ? I'm a blood donor in the UK (Silver Award), here in Scotland I get my prescriptions for free, and I've enough experience with the NHS to be grateful for it. I started giving blood just after the problems you're thinking of, as the screening tests were coming in to make sure this would never happen again.
    And yet my British mother-in-law waited six months for necessary surgery under NHS - but a bed was available within 24 hours if she was willing ti pay for it herself.

    We all know what we know.

    Leave a comment:


  • the ace
    replied
    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

    And yet a faster private care system continues to rove due to the long delays many face. I was married to a Brit for a long time. The system isn't all it's racked up to be.

    As for Hawking, was Britain not going to take care of someone so famous in the face of public outrage? Hawking is hardly a serious example. After all, the president gets terrific care from the Naval Hospital at Bethesda while many Navy veterans wait until they die to be seen.
    And it was my Dad's fame that got him a hip replacement, and my Tribune's that got his heart bypass ? Not to mention a friend who has to attend dialysis sessions three times a week. The whole point about the NHS is that everybody, not just the rich, pays. Everybody owns the hospital, and everybody gets the treatment they need. People go privately (using NHS trained staff) to cut down on waiting times, true enough. But people who need treatment get it.

    Oh and @T.A.Gardner ? I'm a blood donor in the UK (Silver Award), here in Scotland I get my prescriptions for free, and I've enough experience with the NHS to be grateful for it. I started giving blood just after the problems you're thinking of, as the screening tests were coming in to make sure this would never happen again.
    Last edited by the ace; 12 Mar 19, 18:07.

    Leave a comment:


  • T. A. Gardner
    replied
    Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
    It looks like everything for you is based on how much it well cost. Or Greed!

    Have you ever been treated in the UK?
    Thankfully, no. One of the blood donor things that will keep you from donating in the US today was having a transfusion in Europe, and particularly Britain in the last 20 years...

    Leave a comment:


  • Half Pint John
    replied
    _80953718_7b1033d1-5af9-44b4-b774-44cf81ab206d.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • Half Pint John
    replied
    It looks like everything for you is based on how much it well cost. Or Greed!

    Have you ever been treated in the UK?

    Leave a comment:


  • T. A. Gardner
    replied
    Originally posted by the ace View Post

    Actually no.

    The NHS would work fairly well if it weren't for the current government.

    Everybody pays through wages, and required healthcare is free at the time of need (half-pint's treatment would've cost him 600 less). Where it can fall down is non-emergency treatment, with people turning up at Outpatients (E.R.) with trivial ailments, and having to wait - because the toddler who's fallen out of a tree gets seen first, or from inconvenient, but non life-threatening conditions where treatment is scheduled where available.

    Professor Stephen Hawking was full of praise for the NHS - whose treatment allowed him to live to 76, despite his MND, and never cost him a penny, and many people have survived fires, road accidents, and other catastrophes thanks to the dedication of NHS staff - and didn't have to worry about paying for the treatment.

    How much does it cost to have a baby in the US ?

    In the UK, both mother and baby get all the treatment they need for free, no matter what they need in the way of post-natal care.
    You need to remove that word. As for Hawking, that's like saying our President gets good care from the Public Health Service.

    In the US having a baby will run $7,500 to $14,500 according to several websites. How much does it cost in Britain? Well, it isn't "free." Somebody's paying for that service even if it's all tax money from "The Rich." Doctors and hospital staff aren't volunteers who work out of the goodness of their hearts you know.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by the ace View Post

    Actually no.

    The NHS would work fairly well if it weren't for the current government.

    Everybody pays through wages, and required healthcare is free at the time of need (half-pint's treatment would've cost him 600 less). Where it can fall down is non-emergency treatment, with people turning up at Outpatients (E.R.) with trivial ailments, and having to wait - because the toddler who's fallen out of a tree gets seen first, or from inconvenient, but non life-threatening conditions where treatment is scheduled where available.

    Professor Stephen Hawking was full of praise for the NHS - whose treatment allowed him to live to 76, despite his MND, and never cost him a penny, and many people have survived fires, road accidents, and other catastrophes thanks to the dedication of NHS staff - and didn't have to worry about paying for the treatment.

    How much does it cost to have a baby in the US ?

    In the UK, both mother and baby get all the treatment they need for free, no matter what they need in the way of post-natal care.
    And yet a faster private care system continues to rove due to the long delays many face. I was married to a Brit for a long time. The system isn't all it's racked up to be.

    As for Hawking, was Britain not going to take care of someone so famous in the face of public outrage? Hawking is hardly a serious example. After all, the president gets terrific care from the Naval Hospital at Bethesda while many Navy veterans wait until they die to be seen.

    Leave a comment:


  • the ace
    replied
    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
    Single payer is the British NHS. It is a bloated, marginally competent, government run health care plan that is grossly expensive to maintain and operate.
    Actually no.

    The NHS would work fairly well if it weren't for the current government.

    Everybody pays through wages, and required healthcare is free at the time of need (half-pint's treatment would've cost him 600 less). Where it can fall down is non-emergency treatment, with people turning up at Outpatients (E.R.) with trivial ailments, and having to wait - because the toddler who's fallen out of a tree gets seen first, or from inconvenient, but non life-threatening conditions where treatment is scheduled where available.

    Professor Stephen Hawking was full of praise for the NHS - whose treatment allowed him to live to 76, despite his MND, and never cost him a penny, and many people have survived fires, road accidents, and other catastrophes thanks to the dedication of NHS staff - and didn't have to worry about paying for the treatment.

    How much does it cost to have a baby in the US ?

    In the UK, both mother and baby get all the treatment they need for free, no matter what they need in the way of post-natal care.

    Leave a comment:


  • slick_miester
    replied
    Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
    . . . . I'll let you decide where you want to place it. Coverage is required by law and has been so since the time of Bismark.

    I have never needed or used Tricare or the VA. After retiring from the Army I worked in a German firm for 15 years and therefore fully cover under the German system. . . . .
    A question: in Germany, there's a public -- "single payer" -- system roughly analogous to US MediCare except that it's available to all people not just retirees, and then there are private insurance plans which people can opt in? Does that sound correct?

    Leave a comment:

Latest Topics

Collapse

Working...
X