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California : Simi Valley man found innocent after 38 years in prison

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post




    Booze, drugs, and tobacco are wide-spread in California prisons (and available in any prison).

    No pressure,anxiety, or depression? Are you crazy? Leave aside the ever-present chances of rape, try being locked in a small area with the violently mentally ill, murderers, and assaulters of all types, who have sorted themselves out into gangs which use violence as the prime interaction between groups.

    California prisons are more violent than the Federal system (and the feds average two murders a month). This guy would have had over a hundred murders committed in his facility during his stay, and literally thousands of deadly assaults.

    I would be willing to wager that the day-to-day survival tension in a maximum security prison could only be exceeded by that of an infantryman in Vietnam.

    And this guy's tour was close to 40 years.

    Those who thrive in prison are generally not in a maximum security facility, and are not wholly sane anymore.
    Are you comparing prison with military combat? Not so. Read my post above about the unwritten laws between inmates. Art Pepper, one of the greatest jazz alto sax players in history, spent almost 6 years in San Quentin for petty theft and habitual use of heroin (a big crime in the 60's).

    I have read Pepper's book "Straight Life" (big jazz fan here) and his chapters on his various prison stints leading up to the 6 year sentence was an eye opener. Prisons are violent. And there is no doubt about this. But you are exaggerating to say the least. I have also read about a dozen books written by violent criminals in which describe their crimes outside the walls and their crimes inside the walls. Very disturbing stuff. I would suggest reading a few of these books. The figures put out by all of the states in the USA (violence and murder inside the walls) are far from telling the whole story.
    Theo mir ist die munition ausgegangen ich werde diesen ramman auf wiedersehen uns in walhalla

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Kurt Knispel View Post

      Are you comparing prison with military combat? Not so. Read my post above about the unwritten laws between inmates. Art Pepper, one of the greatest jazz alto sax players in history, spent almost 6 years in San Quentin for petty theft and habitual use of heroin (a big crime in the 60's).
      The 60s prison scene is far removed from today's.

      I spent 30+ years in law enforcement, and I would say that max security prison is every bit as stressful as infantry combat in Vietnam or Korea.

      And California prisons are worse than most because the staff has less control.

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      • #18
        Prisons in Colorado are certainly understaffed to the point where the brand new- hugely expensive new CSP maximum security prison has yet to open due to lack of staffing. Conditions in the other prisons are poor due to manpower shortages as well, and also due to politically motivated quota hiring of people unable to properly handle the rigors of the job. Female officers are a good example. They're just not a match for the muscled-up convicts, especially the short, Hispanic women.
        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Kurt Knispel View Post
          Believe it or not there is an unwritten code of moral acceptability.
          I don't believe that morals really have anything to do with it. Everyone, everywhere just has a need to feel superior to someone, and those are just the groups chosen.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by johns624 View Post
            I don't believe that morals really have anything to do with it. Everyone, everywhere just has a need to feel superior to someone, and those are just the groups chosen.
            That's pretty much how it is. There is a distinct pecking order in prison.

            This poor bugger went in on a murder charge, and woe be unto those who cannot live up to their conviction in prison.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post

              That's pretty much how it is. There is a distinct pecking order in prison.

              This poor bugger went in on a murder charge, and woe be unto those who cannot live up to their conviction in prison.
              And yet he survived.
              Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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