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California : Simi Valley man found innocent after 38 years in prison

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  • California : Simi Valley man found innocent after 38 years in prison

    Shunting politics aside for a change this headline caught my eye so I read the story. This man was most definitely innocent. Sperm samples found on the bedsheet and multiple sperm samples on a shirt which did not match the DNA of the convicted man closed the book while other evidence bolstered the facts to prove his innocence. 38 f******g years 1978 - 2017 in a prison half a lifetime One thing I would like to add is that if this man was an African American this case would be a political subject. SMH.

    The few articles I found contained little of his background other then he was a Vietnam veteran and a night manager at a restaurant. Here is one:

    https://www.vcstar.com/story/news/lo...ey/2964175002/
    Last edited by Kurt Knispel; 24 Feb 19, 06:25.
    Theo mir ist die munition ausgegangen ich werde diesen ramman auf wiedersehen uns in walhalla

  • #2
    Man, a macrame rope. You don't see those much anymore.
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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    • #3
      Actually 39 years. Poor guy was released at age 70.
      Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

      Prayers.

      BoRG

      http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
        Man, a macrame rope. You don't see those much anymore.
        Yeah...kind of a shame about the dead people, too.
        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Salinator View Post
          Actually 39 years. Poor guy was released at age 70.
          And received $21 million dollars.
          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

            And received $21 million dollars.
            Not worth the time. Who knows how many years he has left and if his health is good enough to enjoy it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by johns624 View Post

              Not worth the time. Who knows how many years he has left and if his health is good enough to enjoy it.
              I expect he actually received just over $13 million before any state taxes.

              His lawyers get $7 million off the top, and all expenses came out of his end, which usually is around 2%.

              He's lucky the police department kept it going. Not many agencies would second-guess a conviction. And a lot fewer will now that their good deed cost their city $21 million plus legal fees.
              Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

              Comment


              • #8
                It comes in payments and he may not live to see it all. I think it took an executive order from Governor Moonbeam to advance him the first two million dollars.
                Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                Prayers.

                BoRG

                http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

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                • #9
                  He clearly deserves it, and there's judge and jury and prosecutor who need to help make the payments. Just like California to make payments in the hopes he won't collect it all.

                  Cheap 's.
                  Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Salinator View Post
                    It comes in payments and he may not live to see it all. I think it took an executive order from Governor Moonbeam to advance him the first two million dollars.
                    He's lucky he got anything. He got a fair trial, an unbiased investigation, and the full range of appeals after all. If they had had DNA back then he would have been cleared, but that came 20 years later.

                    He's very lucky the evidence wasn't destroyed after his appeals string ran out. Its only been in the last 15 years that the states have really updated the retention standards.

                    There wasn't a failure, bias, or misconduct in this case; the prosecution presented the facts as they existed back then, and the second jury found him guilty. Ten of the first jury felt he was guilty as well.
                    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post

                      He's lucky he got anything. He got a fair trial, an unbiased investigation, and the full range of appeals after all. If they had had DNA back then he would have been cleared, but that came 20 years later.

                      He's very lucky the evidence wasn't destroyed after his appeals string ran out. Its only been in the last 15 years that the states have really updated the retention standards.

                      There wasn't a failure, bias, or misconduct in this case; the prosecution presented the facts as they existed back then, and the second jury found him guilty. Ten of the first jury felt he was guilty as well.
                      I get that, and let's not overlook the relentless work of that detective that or the police dept that reopened the case.

                      My post is in response to what seems to be that he benefited to his advantage due to the payoff.

                      Would any one of us willingly give up four decades of our lives in exchange for wealth at the end? He spent his life between 31 and 70 years old in prison. Those were the years that his generation raised a family and enjoyed watching their grandchildren born and matured. What memories does he have in comparison to those that were not robbed him of four decades?

                      Wealth cannot buy him happiness because he has no family and nothing to live for. Think about this. The man does not even have friends or anyone to network with because he has been in prison for four decades. Is eating the senior early bird special alone at Denny's any more satisfying when you have an advance of $2m?



                      Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                      Prayers.

                      BoRG

                      http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        He looks pretty darn healthy to me. In prison its hard to live a bad life unless you chose to. No drugs, no alcohol, no smoking since about 15 years ago. Plenty of exercise and no pressure, anxiety, or depression. In simple terms, You live an unpressured life because you are only responsible for yourself. That's why many ex-cons look younger then they actually are and are usually physically fit.

                        Again, the above does not apply to all inmates. There are many that stay just as screwed up in prison as they were outside of it. Although illegal, you can get anything inside prison walls if you want. Drugs get smuggled in and hooch can be fermented from many things inside the walls. Many cannot cope with the every day struggles in the world outside. That's why many break the law again and go back to their simple life of 3 hots and a cot with no worries. Free healthcare to.
                        Theo mir ist die munition ausgegangen ich werde diesen ramman auf wiedersehen uns in walhalla

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Kurt Knispel View Post
                          He looks pretty darn healthy to me. In prison its hard to live a bad life unless you chose to. No drugs, no alcohol, no smoking since about 15 years ago. Plenty of exercise and no pressure, anxiety, or depression. In simple terms, You live an unpressured life because you are only responsible for yourself. That's why many ex-cons look younger then they actually are and are usually physically fit.

                          Again, the above does not apply to all inmates. There are many that stay just as screwed up in prison as they were outside of it. Although illegal, you can get anything inside prison walls if you want. Drugs get smuggled in and hooch can be fermented from many things inside the walls. Many cannot cope with the every day struggles in the world outside. That's why many break the law again and go back to their simple life of 3 hots and a cot with no worries. Free healthcare to.
                          Yeah, many criminals thrive in prison, the point you're missing is that he wasn't a criminal. How do you think that you'd do in prison? You almost make it sound like you think it's a relaxing country club.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Kurt Knispel View Post
                            He looks pretty darn healthy to me. In prison its hard to live a bad life unless you chose to. No drugs, no alcohol, no smoking since about 15 years ago. Plenty of exercise and no pressure, anxiety, or depression. In simple terms, You live an unpressured life because you are only responsible for yourself. That's why many ex-cons look younger then they actually are and are usually physically fit.



                            Booze, drugs, and tobacco are wide-spread in California prisons (and available in any prison).

                            No pressure,anxiety, or depression? Are you crazy? Leave aside the ever-present chances of rape, try being locked in a small area with the violently mentally ill, murderers, and assaulters of all types, who have sorted themselves out into gangs which use violence as the prime interaction between groups.

                            California prisons are more violent than the Federal system (and the feds average two murders a month). This guy would have had over a hundred murders committed in his facility during his stay, and literally thousands of deadly assaults.

                            I would be willing to wager that the day-to-day survival tension in a maximum security prison could only be exceeded by that of an infantryman in Vietnam.

                            And this guy's tour was close to 40 years.

                            Those who thrive in prison are generally not in a maximum security facility, and are not wholly sane anymore.
                            Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by johns624 View Post

                              Yeah, many criminals thrive in prison, the point you're missing is that he wasn't a criminal. How do you think that you'd do in prison? You almost make it sound like you think it's a relaxing country club.
                              I'm sure he endured the unimaginable indignities that wife/child killers do at the hands of the violent inmates who have committed "acceptable and respectable crimes" amongst inmates (armed robbery, gang retaliation, mafia figures, ect). What he was convicted of falls into the "no no" crimes determined by other inmates - killing your wife and kids, pedophile, child rape/killing ect. Believe it or not there is an unwritten code of moral acceptability.

                              And, yes it does become a "country club" for habitual criminals who have become "institutionalized"
                              Gangs are rampart in the prison system. Races stick together. Black, Hispanic, and white are constantly at war.


                              Theo mir ist die munition ausgegangen ich werde diesen ramman auf wiedersehen uns in walhalla

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