Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Why is it so difficult to get rid of bad cops?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post

    Fishy, ain't it?



    Why is it so difficult to get rid of bad cops?


    Simple answer; Unions.
    And their lawyers.
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

    Comment


    • #17
      What happens to a cop who testifies against another cop?



      But this problem goes far beyond law enforcement personnel. State boards of regents -- the panels that regulate medical doctors -- are staffed exclusively by MDs. State bar associations are staffed exclusively by attorneys. A doctor who testifies against another doctor risks payback from other members of the medical fraternity when its his a$$ in the dock. Same for lawyers, and 'most any other profession one cares to name. The simple fact of the matter is that few if any professions are equipped to police their own, for fear of payback. Maybe the answer lies in appointing an occasional layman to these professional supervisory bodies, so that at least one member will be immune to fear of professional payback.

      Maybe....
      Last edited by slick_miester; 25 Feb 19, 12:37.
      I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
        What happens to a cop who testifies against another cop?

        [video=youtube];5eju5VLqgfw]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5eju5VLqgfw[/video]

        But this problem goes far beyond law enforcement personnel. State boards of regents -- the panels that regulate medical doctors -- are staffed exclusively by MDs. State bar associations are staffed exclusively by attorneys. A doctor who testifies against another doctor risks payback from other members of the medical fraternity when its his a$$ in the dock. Same for lawyers, and 'most any other profession one cares to name. The simple fact of the matter is that few if any professions are equipped to police their own, for fear of payback. Maybe the answer lies in appointing an occasional layman to these professional supervisory bodies, so that at least one member will be immune to fear of professional payback.

        Maybe....
        It stretches all the way up to our government. The Congressional ethics committee is composed of fellow congressmen.

        In order to be effective, there cannot be a majority of members on their own investigative branch. It has to be the opposite, I believe, of what you propose: no more than one or two actual members on a board and the rest non-members who cannot be pressured. The professional member would be present primarily to present the profession's viewpoint and concerns in an advisory capacity to insure accuracy and comprehension of complex issues.

        Now, where do we find that many honest, intelligent and trustworthy people?
        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
          It stretches all the way up to our government. The Congressional ethics committee is composed of fellow congressmen.
          "Dead-on-balls accurate . . . . " Congress is probably the poster-boy for bodies that should -- but don't -- police themselves.

          Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
          In order to be effective, there cannot be a majority of members on their own investigative branch. It has to be the opposite, I believe, of what you propose: no more than one or two actual members on a board and the rest non-members who cannot be pressured. The professional member would be present primarily to present the profession's viewpoint and concerns in an advisory capacity to insure accuracy and comprehension of complex issues.
          Maybe you're on to something. . . . Expert evaluation and opinion would be essential. For example, obstetrics is considered a high-risk field -- and for good reason: even conscientious practitioners have bad outcomes. A layman might not understand the challenges involved, so a professional would have to be available to the panel in order to express the hazards inherent with such endeavors. The rest of the panel, however, should be free from any fear of reprisals.

          Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
          Now, where do we find that many honest, intelligent and trustworthy people?
          We'll pose that question to Diogenes.



          Rimshot
          I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
            I understand the brotherhood mentality, but after reading this story one has to wonder why after fellow detectives knew this guy was off the rails did it take so long to do something about him?
            http://www.washingtonpost.com/nation...=.0df6186bbdfb
            Ask Rimmer. I have no doubt that he would know the answer.
            We are not now that strength which in old days
            Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
            Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
            To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

            Comment

            Latest Topics

            Collapse

            Working...
            X