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  • #16
    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post

    And as usual, you couldn't take two seconds to look it up like I did.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice_p..._United_States
    I could but it looks like your the socialist here...let someone else do THEIR own work
    "Ask not what your country can do for you"

    Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

    you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

    Comment


    • #17
      This is interesting. From University of California Agronomy Research and Information Center:

      Rice production is concentrated in the Sacramento Valley, where about 95% of California rice is grown, with the balance grown in a few counties of the northern San Joaquin Valley. . . . .

      California is unique among the U.S. rice producing states in its geography, climate and environmental regulations. The growing season is characterized by a Mediterranean climate with negligible rainfall, high solar radiation, and relatively cold night-time temperatures. Because of its dry Mediterranean climate and northern latitude of 38–40°, California varieties and many of the agronomic practices are quite different from other rice production zones in the U.S. . . . .

      http://rice.ucanr.edu/About_California_Rice/
      The real gist of the argument I'd inadvertently started comes from that webpage's illustration of California's rice cycle:

      So the fields are dried, planted, flooded, dried roughly four months after planting, harvested, strawed, then flooded for the winter. Would that be typical of upland rice cultivation? Seems to me that they're using a lot of water in a place that's relatively dry.
      I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post

        Special varieties of rice such as jasmine rice and basmati rice which are of the aromatic variety are imported from Thailand, India, and Pakistan, as such varieties have not been evolved in the US; this demand for import is quite substantial and largely to meet the increasing population of the rice-eating ethnic community.[21]

        https://www.sherckseeds.com/2013/good-yields-for-rice-here-in-northern-indiana/

        I've found nothing relating to upland or dry land rice in CA
        Tell that to the Lundberg Farm family...

        http://www.lundberg.com/product/cali...-jasmine-rice/

        http://www.lundberg.com/product/orga...-basmati-rice/

        Comment


        • #19
          Looks like they SELL it, but were is it produced?
          "Ask not what your country can do for you"

          Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

          you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

          Comment


          • #20
            We are FAR off topic.
            "Ask not what your country can do for you"

            Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

            you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
              Looks like they SELL it, but were is it produced?
              Richburg California...

              Comment


              • #22
                WET! and who produces the crop?

                Still off topic
                Last edited by Half Pint John; 19 Nov 18, 11:51.
                "Ask not what your country can do for you"

                Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

                you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Forest Thinning Can Prevent Fires, Save Water, Study Finds

                  April 24, 2018


                  (CN) – Better forest management would not only prevent wildfires but could serve as a valuable water-conservation tool, according to a study published Tuesday.

                  California could save billions of gallons annually by undertaking significant forest-thinning operations, according to scientists affiliated with the National Science Foundation and the Sierra Critical Zone Observatory.

                  “We’ve known for some time that managed forest fires are the only way to restore the majority of overstocked western forests and reduce the risk of catastrophic fires,” James Roche, a National Park Service hydrologist and lead author of the new study, said in a statement. “We can now add the potential benefit of increased water yield from these watersheds.”

                  Indeed, a variety of scientific studies published in the last decade argue fire-suppression efforts in California have had a detrimental impact. The typical argument says that fire occurred naturally for centuries, allowing the forest to thin itself out and provide periods of regeneration. With fewer fires, tree density has grown. Now, when fires do occur, they burn with an unnatural intensity that creates ecological and economic disasters.

                  Last year’s Thomas Fire was the largest by acreage in California’s history, while the spate of wildfires that ravaged Northern California last fall was the most economically disastrous.

                  Tuesday’s study says thinning projects could also help conserve water, as trees require an enormous amount of water to carry out basic biological functions.

                  “By reducing the water used by plants, more rainfall flows into rivers and accumulates in groundwater,” said Richard Yuretich of the National Science Foundation.
                  ....
                  According to the study, excessive evapotranspiration could interact with climate change to harm an already fragile California ecosystem reeling from years of prolonged drought with the prospect of more bouts of extreme weather.

                  The study, published in the scientific journal Ecohydrology, looked at observation towers in the Sierra Nevada Mountains and United States Geological Survey databases and found more water conserved in areas where forests had been thinned for fire management.

                  For example, Kings River Basin saved 3.7 billion gallons of water per year during an 18-year period beginning in 1990, the study said. Similarly, the American River Basin experienced a savings of 17 billion gallons per year over the same period due to similar thinning practices.

                  But achieving this type of significant, widespread forest restoration throughout the entire Sierra would require enormous spending.

                  The U.S. Forest Service says about 6 to 8 million of the 21 million acres of forest land it manages need immediate restoration, according to the study. Nationwide, 58 million acres are in need of immediate work.

                  For California alone, that work carries a price tag that could rise as high as $10 billion.

                  But the study authors hope the projects they espouse bring enough economic benefits to pay for themselves.
                  ....
                  https://www.courthousenews.com/fores...r-study-finds/
                  ..................................................
                  Obviously, other factors apply as well, and especially in California which is often drier than many other forested regions of this country, and has seen extensive development and building close into the wildland~forest areas. The consistent message has been that thinning the forest floor of "brush" build-up, clearing dead and fallen trees, and logging that helps produce barrier paths can reduce the fuel for forest/wild fires. Quick response when a fire starts can also reduce the growth and spread.

                  FWIW, I live in one of the most forest intense states in the nation, and while some of these preventive methods are employed, they aren't in enough scale and area. A large part of the problem also is the "environmental" constrictions regarding "endangered species" that fail to appreciate the impact of not engaging preventive forest management and fire prevention, resulting in above natural accumulation of fuel on the forest beds/floors.

                  Also, not the date of this article, nearly seven months ago.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by wolfhnd View Post
                    You people have gone insane.
                    Combined with ignorance on the topic and hubris, produces a harmful mix. Attitudes expressed by some here, shared by those whom could have influenced conditions prior, are what helped to make these fires worse than they should have been.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Why Finland is so good at handling forest fires. Hint: It’s not because of raking.

                      https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...fXG?li=BBnb7Kz

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        So Trump was wrong again...
                        We are not now that strength which in old days
                        Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                        Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                        To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Massena View Post
                          So Trump was wrong again...
                          On specific detail, perhaps; not on general concept.
                          Proper forestland managemment is key to reducing impact and devastation of forest/wild fires.

                          Get a Clue ~ Get a Grip (GaC-GaG).

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            BTW, DJT has a far better GaC-GaG than "community organizer" BHO ever did on this issue and we had several rather destructive fires during his so-called "watch".

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              The culprit in the fires that have been raging in California appears to be....PG&E. Their stock is plummeting and has wiped out billions of dollars of shareholders' wealth. The estimated accumulated wildfire liabilities are around $20-30 billion, while the company itself is now worth $12 billion.

                              Sadly, many pensions own stock in PG&E.
                              Last edited by Persephone; 19 Nov 18, 22:37.
                              "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

                              "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                                Why Finland is so good at handling forest fires. Hint: It’s not because of raking.

                                https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...fXG?li=BBnb7Kz
                                It's also not because of weather like the article claims. The Fins conduct far more forest management. Look at Finland on Google Maps. Their forests are crisscrossed with trails and roads that break them up and create fire boundaries. California has none of that. Federal land is pretty much devoid of anything like that and will be. California public lands are the same way and for the same reason: Environmental laws prevent building firebreaks that amount to "roads."

                                In Finland, forest is accessible to fire crews. They can use the firebreaks to contain a fire and get at one quickly before it gets out of hand.

                                Now, in some parts of California such a system would be difficult to implement even if they wanted to as the terrain is more rugged than in Finland. But, more trails and roads on public lands would be very useful to getting crews in quickly and helping them contain a fire. It would reduce dependence on air tankers and in turn reduce the cost of fighting fires.
                                But, given that rampant, insane, Leftist environmentalism is the norm in California none of that is going to happen anytime in the coming century. So, California will continue to burn itself to the ground.

                                Comment

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