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DOJ: Majority Of Violent Crimes Go Unreported Each Year

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  • DOJ: Majority Of Violent Crimes Go Unreported Each Year

    As National Crime Prevention Month approaches, the Justice Department is releasing alarming statistics about the number of violent crimes that go unreported.

    In a recent survey by the departmentís Bureau of Justice Statistics, researchers revealed nearly 60-percent of violent crimes were not reported to authorities in 2016, while about 50-percent of serious violent crimes also went unreported. These types of incidents include robbery and rape as well as sexual and aggravated assault.

    This comes as cities throughout the country are experiencing a rise in violent crime.
    http://www.oann.com/doj-majority-of-...ted-each-year/
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

  • #2
    I have been saying for years that the decline in violent crime the UCR has claimed was not factual.

    Chiefs of Police are political appointees, and Sheriffs are elected officials. The politicians demand a decline in crime the simplest thing to do is to just massage the numbers. The UCR is a voluntary report, and there is no penalty for providing inaccurate numbers.

    The truth, however, has a nasty habit of bobbing to the surface.
    Last edited by Arnold J Rimmer; 20 Sep 18, 10:34.
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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    • #3
      I recall some years back that the FBI "lowered" the crime rate by deleting certain categories of violent crimes from their reporting.

      The system is well and truly broken.
      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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      • #4
        If crimes go unreported how do we know that they happened?
        "Ask not what your country can do for you"

        Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

        youíre entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
          If crimes go unreported how do we know that they happened?
          Same way we know that a lot of rapes go unreported and a lot of illnesses also go unreported. Polls, studies, surveys, etc, and people who tell others that they have been victimized but never reported it because "nothing gets done about it anyway". Emergency rooms are great sources of crimes that go unreported.

          I'm sure you know personally of a lot of stuff in your immediate area that never gets reported to authorities, as just one example. I do, too, in my area.
          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

            Same way we know that a lot of rapes go unreported and a lot of illnesses also go unreported. Polls, studies, surveys, etc, and people who tell others that they have been victimized but never reported it because "nothing gets done about it anyway". Emergency rooms are great sources of crimes that go unreported.

            I'm sure you know personally of a lot of stuff in your immediate area that never gets reported to authorities, as just one example. I do, too, in my area.
            The simplest way is to simply change categories or reporting standards.

            For example, when Ann Richards, a Democrat, became gov of Texas, she promised to reduce crime. She took office, and for reporting purposes sexual assaults were then changed from 'violent crime' to 'crimes against persons'.

            Result: a 22% drop in violent crime.

            Another method: if you have a crime without an identifiable suspect, tag the report as 'information'. Therefore it will not show up on state or UCR reporting.

            There's numerous other ways, particularly with computerized systems, to keep UCR low.

            Whenever we got a major update to our system, the techs implementing it would always brief command staff "Now be careful not to check this box here or the report won't show up on UCR. We're working on fixing that. Likewise, if you fill in any data in this box on the arrest report, it will be blocked from UCR. Let your troops know, and we'll fix it in future updates".
            Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
              If crimes go unreported how do we know that they happened?
              The great question never truly answered.

              I can fly like Superman. But all of my flights are "unreported".

              Surveys don't need to be proven in a court of law, so you can say just about anything. I won't say crime isn't going up because AJ raises some good points. But unreported crime isn't crime. Not empirically. It's hearsay.
              A new life awaits you in the off world colonies; the chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Pirateship1982 View Post

                The great question never truly answered.

                I can fly like Superman. But all of my flights are "unreported".

                Surveys don't need to be proven in a court of law, so you can say just about anything. I won't say crime isn't going up because AJ raises some good points. But unreported crime isn't crime. Not empirically. It's hearsay.
                In 2012 3,7 million crimes were recorded by the police in England and Wales .The number of reported crimes was 8,9 million .

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                • #9
                  The police in my city once reported a dead mob leader found in the trunk of his car as a suicide. That sort of thing must be fairly rare. Isn't murder mostly immune from being under reported?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by wolfhnd View Post
                    The police in my city once reported a dead mob leader found in the trunk of his car as a suicide. That sort of thing must be fairly rare. Isn't murder mostly immune from being under reported?
                    The FBI stopped reporting rape as a violent crime, so who knows? In your case, however, the crime was reported, just not as murder. I suspect that some cases like that one are seen as a gift to the community, not to be examined too closely.

                    Everything is about spin and perception these days.
                    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ljadw View Post

                      In 2012 3,7 million crimes were recorded by the police in England and Wales .The number of reported crimes was 8,9 million .
                      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Pirateship1982 View Post

                        The great question never truly answered.

                        I can fly like Superman. But all of my flights are "unreported".

                        Surveys don't need to be proven in a court of law, so you can say just about anything. I won't say crime isn't going up because AJ raises some good points. But unreported crime isn't crime. Not empirically. It's hearsay.
                        No, they're not. You're that "glowing ball of light" that makes a farting sound as it zips by Roswell. They know you all too well there, it seems.
                        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by wolfhnd View Post
                          The police in my city once reported a dead mob leader found in the trunk of his car as a suicide. That sort of thing must be fairly rare. Isn't murder mostly immune from being under reported?
                          It used to be. But in the mid-90s the UCR changed its standards, and the stats have never been right since.

                          It used to be that murder was the stat that couldn't be fudged, but in the wake of the 90s change murder dropped by 5000 a year virtually overnight.

                          The most telling feature is while the Feds are claiming that crime is down, prison over-crowding is on the rise, the courts are as backlogged as ever, and the demand for police officers, probation officers, correction officer, parole officers, etc, keeps rising.

                          So the system keeps demanding more workers, the prison population keeps climbing, and yet the number of crimes on paper has dropped dramatically on paper.

                          The math doesn't add up.

                          In my career, the job got worse every year in terms of call and case volume. I would say that in Texas at least, and most red states, gang and OC operations took a severe beating, although Colorado and the other drug states are now worsening in that regard.

                          But I will never believe that crime has dropped. Everything that spawns crime (family breakdown, narcotics, poverty, failed education system, cultural examples) have not only remained unchecked, but have increased in severity.
                          Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                          • #14
                            Agreed, but acknowledging that is politically dangerous to careers, so officially it must be made to appear as though progress is being made.

                            Our mistake in Colorado was legalizing marijuana which has opened the door to a lot of additional criminal activity. All I can say in our defense is that Colorado is, and has been for many decades, a Democratic state, and the politicians refuse to acknowledge the increase in crime while constantly emphasizing the tax monies. Again, presenting false perceptions is the rule of the day.
                            Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                              ....

                              The most telling feature is while the Feds are claiming that crime is down, prison over-crowding is on the rise, the courts are as backlogged as ever, and the demand for police officers, probation officers, correction officer, parole officers, etc, keeps rising.


                              So the system keeps demanding more workers, the prison population keeps climbing, and yet the number of crimes on paper has dropped dramatically on paper.

                              The math doesn't add up
                              .

                              ...


                              Faulty reasoning!

                              In fact one can argue that crime is down EXACTLY because there is a higher rate of incarceration.

                              Or one can argue that there may not even exist any causal relationship between higher rate of incarceration and murder rates.

                              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarc...nviolent_crime

                              Violent crime was not responsible for the quadrupling of the incarcerated population in the United States from 1980 to 2003. Violent crime rates had been relatively constant or declining over those decades. The prison population was increased primarily by public policy changes causing more prison sentences and lengthening time served, e.g. through mandatory minimum sentencing, "three strikes" laws, and reductions in the availability of parole or early release. 49 percent of sentenced state inmates were held for violent offenses.

                              In short, the idea that the prison population or the demand for more LEO officers shows that we have an increase of crime is wrong. Such things (higher demand for LEOs and higher incarceration) may be a reflection of a changing public policy towards a culture of "zero -tolerance."

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