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Dallas cop shoots man in own apartment

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  • #76
    Originally posted by johns624 View Post
    I could agree with that if it WAS her apartment. In this case, I don't think that defense should be available.
    Just an aside---I find the fact that she lived in downtown Dallas unusual. I used to hang around with a few old school Detroit cops 30 years ago. They knew, better than anyone, what a shiithole a big city was. They were great cops on duty, but they wanted to be as far as possible away from the grittiness, once they left for the day. Back then, Detroit had a residency rule. It was an open secret that all the families lived in the 'burbs and 3-4 cops would rent a house in the city and crash there and use it for their mailing address.
    Their is no mention of her having any immediate family. Lots of single people, including police officers, live in cities in apartments. It is much easier for work and social life. Looks like both the officer and the victim were singles living in an apartment block.

    "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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    • #77
      Originally posted by Surrey View Post
      Their is no mention of her having any immediate family. Lots of single people, including police officers, live in cities in apartments. It is much easier for work and social life. Looks like both the officer and the victim were singles living in an apartment block.
      In apartments, yes, although that is not as common as in the UK. And seldom do they live close to work, and especially don't advertise where they live by walking home in uniform.

      That's extremely unusual, particularly in Texas where pedestrian traffic is very light.
      Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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      • #78
        Sounds like the victim hd every right to defend himself and his home with force.
        "Ask not what your country can do for you"

        Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

        you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

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        • #79
          Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post

          In apartments, yes, although that is not as common as in the UK. And seldom do they live close to work, and especially don't advertise where they live by walking home in uniform.

          That's extremely unusual, particularly in Texas where pedestrian traffic is very light.
          The article says she lives extremely close to the police station. The police were there within four minutes of her call. Probably seemed easier to her just walk straight home rather than going through the hassle of changing. Do police forces in the US discourage officers from being in uniform when they are not on duty?
          There was an interesting discussion a few years ago when it was suggested that police officers travel to and from work in uniform. Few police supported the idea.


          https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-14789600
          "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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          • #80
            Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
            This is the CDC's (cdc.gov) data:

            Somethings wrong with that chart.

            How can TOTAL be less than two other categories? Even if it's a total for just the whites and 'others' the numbers still don't add up right (look at 2005 for example). Lastly why are the categories #2-4 identified with non-Hispanic and then have a Hispanic category?

            Maybe I'm missing something, I don't know.

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            • #81
              Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
              Sounds like the victim hd every right to defend himself and his home with force.
              Good point.

              So could he have legally shot her as soon as he opened the door? She obviously was trying to get in and as far as he would be concerned maybe it was a burglar thinking nobody was home.

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              • #82
                Originally posted by Canuckster View Post

                Somethings wrong with that chart.

                How can TOTAL be less than two other categories? Even if it's a total for just the whites and 'others' the numbers still don't add up right (look at 2005 for example). Lastly why are the categories #2-4 identified with non-Hispanic and then have a Hispanic category?

                Maybe I'm missing something, I don't know.
                It's not totals, but per capita. Therefore, since there are many more whites, their per capita rate is lower than some other ethnic groups, skewing the overall rate.

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                • #83
                  Originally posted by johns624 View Post

                  It's not totals, but per capita. Therefore, since there are many more whites, their per capita rate is lower than some other ethnic groups, skewing the overall rate.
                  I'm not sure about that John. Each category is supposed to be per 100,000 i.e. in 1990 50-something blacks per 100,000 committed homicide.

                  I assume you're saying the numbers on Y-axis are within their own ethnic group and the total is based upon total population regardless of ethnicity.

                  That could be I guess but if that's the case it certainly not clear. Need to think about it further.

                  OK- i got it, you're right.
                  Last edited by Canuckster; 11 Sep 18, 10:13.

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                  • #84
                    Originally posted by johns624 View Post

                    It's not totals, but per capita. Therefore, since there are many more whites, their per capita rate is lower than some other ethnic groups, skewing the overall rate.
                    So the chart is deceptive? Is it from a RW source?

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by inevtiab1e View Post

                      So the chart is deceptive? Is it from a RW source?
                      It's from the CDC, a government agency. It's not deceptive at all. Just replace "Total" with "Average" and it's very easy to understand.
                      PS--I just don't understand how it's relevant to the OP news story.

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                      • #86
                        Originally posted by johns624 View Post

                        It's from the CDC, a government agency. It's not deceptive at all. Just replace "Total" with "Average" and it's very easy to understand.
                        PS--I just don't understand how it's relevant to the OP news story.
                        The chart is from the CDC? I didn't see a link in his post to the information. Just an image with a chart.

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                        • #87
                          Originally posted by johns624 View Post
                          PS--I just don't understand how it's relevant to the OP news story.
                          That was the other thing I found confusing about the chart.

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Originally posted by Surrey View Post

                            The article says she lives extremely close to the police station. The police were there within four minutes of her call. Probably seemed easier to her just walk straight home rather than going through the hassle of changing. Do police forces in the US discourage officers from being in uniform when they are not on duty?
                            There was an interesting discussion a few years ago when it was suggested that police officers travel to and from work in uniform. Few police supported the idea.


                            https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-14789600
                            A four-minute emergency response is the goal of every municipal agency in Texas: that the police can respond to any point in the city within four minutes of receiving an emergency call.

                            Units rove, they're not normally responding from a police station.

                            Its extremely unusual for an off-officer in uniform to walk anywhere; it's unusual for people in a Texas to walk much. We're a culture of vehicles.

                            Most agencies strongly discourage running errands when off-duty and in uniform.

                            In my agency about 50% changed at home, 50% at the PD. But other than self-serve gas or dry cleaning we were not supposed to run errands.
                            Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                            • #89
                              Originally posted by Canuckster View Post

                              Good point.

                              So could he have legally shot her as soon as he opened the door? She obviously was trying to get in and as far as he would be concerned maybe it was a burglar thinking nobody was home.
                              No. She was in uniform. There are virtually no rules of self-defense against a uniformed police officer in Texas. Note I said virtually, not literally.

                              That argument has been tried many times in both criminal and civil court, and never came close to winning. Every active tactical team has encountered that defense at least once, I would bet.

                              They never fly. It's like the myth that the police need a search warrant to enter a home or place of business. Every month if not week in Texas someone's defense attorney breaks the bad news to a defendant about that one.

                              It's secure from unreasonable search.
                              Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post

                                No. She was in uniform. There are virtually no rules of self-defense against a uniformed police officer in Texas. Note I said virtually, not literally.

                                That argument has been tried many times in both criminal and civil court, and never came close to winning. Every active tactical team has encountered that defense at least once, I would bet.

                                They never fly. It's like the myth that the police need a search warrant to enter a home or place of business. Every month if not week in Texas someone's defense attorney breaks the bad news to a defendant about that one.

                                It's secure from unreasonable search.
                                Bold mine

                                The above post simply expresses the wishes of a "professional" LEO in Texas to do whatever he wants with impunity and not the actual reality.

                                from
                                '
                                http://www.kbtx.com/content/news/Man...418017733.html

                                BURLESON COUNTY, Tex. (KBTX) -


                                The man who shot and killed a Burleson County deputy in 2013 during a surprise raid at his home has pleaded guilty to drug-related charges.

                                ...


                                During that raid, Magee shot and killed Burleson County Deputy Adam Sowders.

                                Magee was initially charged with capital murder. However, Magee's attorney argued before a grand jury that Magee was acting in self-defense.

                                Because the SWAT team was not required to knock or identify themselves before entering Magee's mobile home near Snook, Magee's attorney argued that Magee fired his weapon against "unknown intruders" to protect himself, his property, and his pregnant girlfriend.

                                The grand jury dropped the capital murder charge.



                                And in the previous case they HAD a warrant! IN this case not only is not there any warrant, but also there is no case of any reasonable search.
                                Last edited by pamak; 11 Sep 18, 11:38.
                                My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

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