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  • #16
    Originally posted by wolfhnd View Post
    It is not an isolated case.

    "In less than a year, juries in the county have convicted two police officers of murder."

    https://www.dallasnews.com/news/crim...-man-apartment

    It is not easily dismissed as poor training or a bad recruiting process.
    Keep in mind it is a massively populated county, and one of those convictions was for an out-of-area officer who committed manslaughter in an incident unrelated to his occupation. IIRC the other was DWI-related. Both were manslaughter, not murder.

    This one, though, really comes across as strange. I lived in apartments (including huge mega-complexes) for over ten years, and I never went to the wrong apartment. I don't understand how that could happen.

    That said, if it was simply a case of mistaken location, she has a solid case; under Texas law anyone who unlawfully enters a building is considered a deadly threat to an occupant.

    However, I just can't see how you go to a wrong apartment. This one smells. The key will be if the Rangers can dig up any connection between the two.

    She was in uniform, having just walked home after work.
    Last edited by Arnold J Rimmer; 09 Sep 18, 17:26.
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Gixxer86g View Post
      A female officer of small size is just inviting a situation like her first incident. I can see her being scared of her own shadow after that. She should have found a new occupation. But that is just conjecture.
      Keep in mind it is illegal to discriminate based upon gender or body size; even upper body strength is touchy.

      Years ago Austin PD has a female officer who needed a booster seat in order to be able to drive safely. I think she was 4' 11".

      A real problem, as I've said many times before, is training and background. There are too few veterans coming into police work. The majority of new-hires have never been in a fight of any kind in their life. Academies do too little hands on, and too much classroom training. Very few actually practice fighting at all.

      You end up with officers who go for the 'best' option every time.

      But I still can't wrap my head around the wrong apartment.
      Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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      • #18
        It should be noted that the guy she shot in 2017 lived.

        However, despite a stack of charges that he pled guilty to, he only got two years.

        That is odd (the low sentence).
        Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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        • #19
          Another thing that should not be typical is that roughly 40 percent of homicides are committed by a demographic group that makes up less than 5 percent of the population. Liberals of course don't want to talk about that. Nothing we do to change police training or recruitment will have much effect on homicide unless communities take responsibility for their violent young men.

          Unless you think parenting is irrelevant it would seem single mothers not the police are the serious problem.
          We hunt the hunters

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          • #20
            Originally posted by wolfhnd View Post
            Another thing that should not be typical is that roughly 40 percent of homicides are committed by a demographic group that makes up less than 5 percent of the population. Liberals of course don't want to talk about that. Nothing we do to change police training or recruitment will have much effect on homicide unless communities take responsibility for their violent young men.

            Unless you think parenting is irrelevant it would seem single mothers not the police are the serious problem.
            WTF man!

            I want everybody to take note that except you, nobody else up until now has brought race in this thread even though the victim was black. And I have to highlight this fact because you are not one of the black or liberal posters who immediately draw fire when they talk about race. Then the usual "angry" old men come forward accusing posters for being racists..

            I made a comment based on the information in your link that it is typical to have the Dallas Police Department investigate shootings that involve an officer of the department which I find it wrong and a procedure that should change and be more like the procedure we see in this case when a different department (Rangers) investigate the event. How is your response related to anything associated with this thread?
            My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

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            • #21
              Originally posted by wolfhnd View Post
              Another thing that should not be typical is that roughly 40 percent of homicides are committed by a demographic group that makes up less than 5 percent of the population. Liberals of course don't want to talk about that. Nothing we do to change police training or recruitment will have much effect on homicide unless communities take responsibility for their violent young men.

              Unless you think parenting is irrelevant it would seem single mothers not the police are the serious problem.
              Lack of positive role models, a plethora of negative role models, and a sub-culture encouraging a conscious break with mainstream values.

              The black community has been absolutely gutted by the drug culture and the welfare state. In the 1930s the strongest social unit in the USA was the black extended family. Since the '60s the black family has been utterly trashed, almost as if deliberately.

              In the course of my career I saw the life drained from the black community. Education and conformity is held in contempt, and prison is an accepted rite of passage.
              Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post

                Lack of positive role models, a plethora of negative role models, and a sub-culture encouraging a conscious break with mainstream values.

                The black community has been absolutely gutted by the drug culture and the welfare state. In the 1930s the strongest social unit in the USA was the black extended family. Since the '60s the black family has been utterly trashed, almost as if deliberately.

                In the course of my career I saw the life drained from the black community. Education and conformity is held in contempt, and prison is an accepted rite of passage.
                The other usual suspect is piling on...
                Better talk about the blacks than incompetent cops! It is understandable though that he wants to support his group..


                Warning: If I see an attempt to steer this thread towards the problems in black community, I will report the posts (including the previous ones) and ask moderators to bring this thread back to track... I let it slide twice with wolf in his previous posts, and I am letting it slide once more now with Rimmer.
                Last edited by pamak; 09 Sep 18, 18:04.
                My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by pamak View Post

                  The other usual suspect is piling on...
                  Better talk about the blacks than incompetent cops! It is understandable though that he wants to support his group..


                  Warning: If I see an attempt to steer this thread towards the problems in black community, I will report the posts (including the previous ones) and ask moderators to bring this thread back to track... I let it slide twice with wolf in his previous posts, and I am letting it slide once more now with Rimmer.
                  Go right ahead and report it. The point is that the story in the original post is news because it satisfies a narrative that deflects from more serious issues and supports a left leaning agenda. You do not have to agree with that assessment but it is not off topic.

                  ​​​​​​The latest provisional data from the CDC indicates that between June 2016 and June 2017, drug overdoses killed more than 66,000 people in the U.S. This marks a 16 percent increase from the previous 12-month period.

                  Now that is a problem that makes even the homicide rate look less significant. The number of people killed by police officers under suspicious circumstances, while tragic, does not warrant the wide media coverage it receives. In any case reducing crime will be the most effective way to address the problem.
                  We hunt the hunters

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                  • #24
                    Please return to topic and leave racial demographics/statistics out of the conversation.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                      It should be noted that the guy she shot in 2017 lived.

                      However, despite a stack of charges that he pled guilty to, he only got two years.

                      That is odd (the low sentence).
                      Are you thinking that maybe her shooting him wasn't a cut and dried good shoot so they cut him some slack to avoid problems?
                      I'd like to see the comments from that shooting and whether the Texas Rangers are delving deeper into it since they told DPD not to file manslaughter charges.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by johns624 View Post

                        Are you thinking that maybe her shooting him wasn't a cut and dried good shoot so they cut him some slack to avoid problems?
                        I'd like to see the comments from that shooting and whether the Texas Rangers are delving deeper into it since they told DPD not to file manslaughter charges.
                        It's possible. Or maybe the City just wanted to avoid going through the motions to quash a lawsuit. He had a parole violation, so the new charges may have been moot.

                        Since the Rangers asked DPD to hold back on charges, my guess is one of two things:

                        1) The Rangers have found a connection between the deceased and the officer, which would mean that manslaughter is too low a charge.

                        or

                        2) The Rangers have found something which supports the officer's claim that she thought she was at her own apartment, in which case waiting and letting a Grand Jury sort it out would be best. For example if the officer was on medication which could cause this sort of disorientation, or was being treated for mental issues such as PTSD which could account for her going to the wrong apartment.

                        All use of force, LE or civilian, must be weighed on its merit based upon the actor's perception at the time the force was used. If the officer can successfully establish she legitimately believed that the apartment is hers, then her use of force would be justified. In Texas a home intruder is a deadly threat.

                        I don't know which it is, but given DPD's desperate manpower situation (they cannot patrol their entire city with the manpower they have left) #2 isn't out of the realm of possibility.
                        Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Wouldn't something like your #2 open the officer/department up for a liability lawsuit since she maybe should have been on medical leave or rubber gun desk duty?

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                          • #28
                            Tragic...probably dogged tired, wired up from a long, hard shift and mistakenly enters the wrong apartment where she reacts to a strange man as she was trained. Tragic for both of them, but curious as well.

                            When I lived in apartments, the doors were always locked when I was in, to prevent unauthorized entry. I have to wonder why his door wasn't locked.
                            Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                            • #29
                              The latest story is that the door was locked. He heard somebody fooling around at his door and opened it up. My speculation--he looked through his peephole, saw it was a uniformed cop and thought it was safe.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by johns624 View Post
                                Wouldn't something like your #2 open the officer/department up for a liability lawsuit since she maybe should have been on medical leave or rubber gun desk duty?
                                The City, possibly. With the ADA in place it isn't easy to predict. Also, if she took the meds (if there were any) after work and then walked home, then no one is to blame.

                                And for all I know she might have been on desk duty; all I have heard is she worked a 12 hour shift and then walked home, as she lived close by.

                                Pulling an officer's weapon is not easy outside of a shooting or very serious disciplinary incident. If you are wearing a badge, you carry a weapon. Even after a shooting you don't surrender your badge, just your weapon for testing. You carry your spare or the department issues you another (depending on whether the agency issues weapons or not).

                                Odds are she still is carrying a badge and a weapon right now, although I do not know for certain.
                                Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                                Comment

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