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  • #76
    Tesla brings in these non Union jobs paying 17$ an hr. The NYS Gov dropped the ball by giving Tesla 1 billion USD..that money should have gone to Republic Steel which pays workers a much higher wage in a protected Union job. An American man or women today out of high school or even college does not have the same opportunity as any American today whom is 40+ years old.

    No wonder our country today has mass shootings, mass drug addiction, a huge divorce rate...this is in part due to our modern floundering economy that is a disgrace to the USA of the 1940s. The USA is not what it used to be.

    Our economy today is based on greed and corruption. The USA as a whole needs to bring back the Union factory jobs that we once had in major cities where tens of thousands of Americans were able to get good jobs and be set for life. In the 1940s American men black and white Christian alike had great paying jobs, today otoh its a struggle.


    Last edited by Stonewall_Jack; 20 Aug 18, 20:40.
    Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
    Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

    George S Patton

    Comment


    • #77
      Originally posted by Tuebor View Post

      I'm a little wary of H2. Not sure how idiot proof it can be made, especially during refueling.
      This is a hydrogen fueling station in California. They made it as idiot proof as they could...

      Comment


      • #78
        Originally posted by pamak View Post

        Yes, I do!

        Here it is!

        http://www.nap.edu/read/21874/chapter/5

        From

        Committee on Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident
        for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants

        Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board

        Division on Earth and Life Studies

        Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident: Lessons Learned for Spent Fuel Storage


        RECOMMENDATION 2.1: The U.S. nuclear industry and its regulator should give additional attention to improving the ability of plant operators to measure real-time conditions in spent fuel pools and maintain adequate cooling of stored spent fuel during severe accidents and terrorist attacks. These improvements should go beyond the current post-Fukushima response to include hardened and redundant (1) physical surveillance systems (e.g., cameras), (2) radiation monitors, (3) pool temperature monitors, (4) pool water-level monitors, and (5) means to deliver pool makeup water or sprays even when physical access to the pools is limited by facility damage or high radiation levels.

        Now feel free to make your counter points through youtube videos
        Simple enough. You either didn't read or understand the material in what you posted.

        The discussion was on spent fuel rods in bundles stored in a pool next to the reactor.
        Frist, these rods were not in some sort of shipping container, but simply in the normal bundles pulled from the reactor during a refueling.
        Next, the bulk of the paper dealt with keeping the rods covered with water and cooling them adequately. This is necessary because residual decay in the fuel and fission products produces heat.
        Third, these pools are not long term storage, but rather short term used to allow further decay of fission fragments in particular before the material is shipped to long term storage or to a reprocessing facility.
        It is also clear you don't understand or know what the radiological and other risks are associated with this spent material. If the storage pools were the only problem involved here, keeping them covered with water would have been relatively easy by any of the means discussed in the paper. But, the problem was high levels of contamination and radioactivity from the now damaged reactor itself next to the pool.
        It is also clear that there was never any major danger of radioactive release or mass release of radioactivity associated with the spent fuel. The issue was solely keeping it covered with water and keeping that water at a safe temperature by circulation.
        The hydrogen release noted is mainly caused by a reaction between water and the zirconium used as rod cladding material. When the zirconium gets too hot it reacts with water forming an oxide and releasing hydrogen. This hydrogen is not particularly radioactive, but does represent a fire and explosion hazard if it accumulates.

        So, the whole study simply recommends improvements to an existing system that worked in very trying and unusual circumstances. That is, the recommendations make the system safer, not make an unsafe system safe.

        Like I said, you have no idea what you're talking about. We're done.

        Comment


        • #79
          Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post

          Simple enough. You either didn't read or understand the material in what you posted.

          The discussion was on spent fuel rods in bundles stored in a pool next to the reactor.
          Frist, these rods were not in some sort of shipping container, but simply in the normal bundles pulled from the reactor during a refueling.
          Next, the bulk of the paper dealt with keeping the rods covered with water and cooling them adequately. This is necessary because residual decay in the fuel and fission products produces heat.
          Third, these pools are not long term storage, but rather short term used to allow further decay of fission fragments in particular before the material is shipped to long term storage or to a reprocessing facility.
          It is also clear you don't understand or know what the radiological and other risks are associated with this spent material. If the storage pools were the only problem involved here, keeping them covered with water would have been relatively easy by any of the means discussed in the paper. But, the problem was high levels of contamination and radioactivity from the now damaged reactor itself next to the pool.
          It is also clear that there was never any major danger of radioactive release or mass release of radioactivity associated with the spent fuel. The issue was solely keeping it covered with water and keeping that water at a safe temperature by circulation.
          The hydrogen release noted is mainly caused by a reaction between water and the zirconium used as rod cladding material. When the zirconium gets too hot it reacts with water forming an oxide and releasing hydrogen. This hydrogen is not particularly radioactive, but does represent a fire and explosion hazard if it accumulates.

          So, the whole study simply recommends improvements to an existing system that worked in very trying and unusual circumstances. That is, the recommendations make the system safer, not make an unsafe system safe.

          Like I said, you have no idea what you're talking about. We're done.
          But when did the discussion become just about certain parts of fuel storage? And why does it matter if these pools are short or long term if an accident there can produce a catastrophe? And the issue is not just about what happened in Japan but about the actions that the committee recommends that the US should take in order to increase the safety of its storage program (which is why I chose to quote the part about their recommendations). If they ask for additional measures, it is obvious that they have reasons to feel concerned despite your claims the supposedly you won't have a problem to use your pool to store nuclear waste (which I understand that it was an exaggeration but does reveal your point that you do not seem to be at all concerned about the safety of the current storage procedures).

          And you also make claims without showing data: Again, you say that the containers can survive fire! Fine! For how much time and up to what peak temperature? Just claiming that something can survive fire does not mean that it can survive any type of fire. Do you disagree with that? And there is also the issue of simply having a failure of quality control. Defective construction, impurities, hair cracks that passed inspection by mistake or something to that effect which can simply create catastrophic failure in conditions that may be even less severe than the ones specified for a properly constructed container!
          Last edited by pamak; 20 Aug 18, 21:35.
          My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

          Comment


          • #80
            Originally posted by TactiKill J. View Post
            Republicans happy that American businesses are failing. Interesting.
            Only the stupid liberal ones.
            My worst jump story:
            My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
            As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
            No lie.

            ~
            "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
            -2 Commando Jumpmaster

            Comment


            • #81
              Originally posted by pamak View Post

              But when did the discussion become just about certain parts of fuel storage? And why does it matter if these pools are short or long term if an accident there can produce a catastrophe? And the issue is not just about what happened in Japan but about the actions that the committee recommends that the US should take in order to increase the safety of its storage program (which is why I chose to quote the part about their recommendations). If they ask for additional measures, it is obvious that they have reasons to feel concerned despite your claims the supposedly you won't have a problem to use your pool to store nuclear waste (which I understand that it was an exaggeration but does reveal your point that you do not seem to be at all concerned about the safety of the current storage procedures).

              And you also make claims without showing data: Again, you say that the containers can survive fire! Fine! For how much time and up to what peak temperature? Just claiming that something can survive fire does not mean that it can survive any type of fire. Do you disagree with that? And there is also the issue of simply having a failure of quality control. Defective construction, impurities, hair cracks that passed inspection by mistake or something to that effect which can simply create catastrophic failure in conditions that may be even less severe than the ones specified for a properly constructed container!

              Comment


              • #82
                Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post

                The bias comes from people like you who claim that they can offer their personal house pool for the storage of fissile material...


                https://forums.armchairgeneral.com/f...89#post5056689


                Anyway, continue with your memes because obviously you do not want to talk about facts...
                My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

                Comment


                • #83
                  Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post

                  What to hear the story of how Berta Benz the wife of Karl Benz made the first drive of distance from Mannheim to Pforzheim in one of the first gasoline power cars ?
                  AUG. 12, 1888: ROAD TRIP! BERTA TAKES THE BENZ

                  https://www.wired.com/2010/08/0812be...rst-road-trip/

                  Guess how long it takes today after advancements in road, energy supply and cars.

                  Stay here in the present, soon to be the past and watch how the world advance without the US into the future.

                  I'm not saying that there is no place for an electric car, only that currently it is not practical for most people and without the subsidies, not exactly affordable. The claimed range is only under ideal conditions that will rarely happen in real life, such as a small underweight driver with no luggage or passengers, no radio, no heat-air-ac, no windows up and down, no headlights if possible, no wipers or defrost, no headwind, no hills, straightest flat route with no stop/go, no blinkers or signaling while cruising at the ideal speed, and so on, and so on.

                  An electric car would be ideal for an at-home mom or some old person that does not have serious commute and have most of the day and all of the night to recharge before picking up groceries or going to the bingo parlor, which incidentally is mostly what I see driving electric vehicles. People that have to commute for a living will generally at best drive a hybrid or maybe a clown car if they don't fear being blown off the road by a slight breeze.

                  I have a neighbor with a tiny Fiat clown car and a giant Dodge Ram pickup. He uses that Fiat to run errands on his day off or go grocery shopping or go pick up takeout food when he comes home from work. He commutes to work in that giant Ram because he thinks it is simply unsafe to drive that on the freeway. I commented on the gas consumption, but it turns out that that even thought the Fiat had better overall gas mileage, it is mainly city miles that gives it that paper advantage. On the freeway barreling along doing 70-75 mph, a modern day American big block is going to outperform a small engine that is revving at a much higher RPM, or so it was explained to me. Hell, his new truck weighing more than twice as much as my Honda is getting better gas mileage due being newer. Advancements come in ALL areas. Why is advancement and innovations argument only applied to what you support?
                  Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                  Prayers.

                  BoRG

                  http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Tesla will fail, but electronic cars are here to stay. Most car companies are coming out with their own(AFAIK), and will mercilessly exploit the money Musk "wasted" on research/marketing.

                    On a side note: most trains/trolleys run on electricity, isn't that infrastructure that can be exploited?
                    Wisdom is personal

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Originally posted by Karri View Post
                      Tesla will fail, but electronic cars are here to stay. Most car companies are coming out with their own(AFAIK), and will mercilessly exploit the money Musk "wasted" on research/marketing.

                      On a side note: most trains/trolleys run on electricity, isn't that infrastructure that can be exploited?
                      Battery cars are a dead end. Hybrids may continue for a couple of decades or more. A truly mass producible reasonably priced fuel cell car is likely the future. I doubt that most car companies would bother to even produce an all-electric battery car if it wasn't for heavy government subsidies and regulations requiring zero-emission vehicles. Without government baiting and forcing companies to build them, they wouldn't.
                      For example, the Chevy Volt all-electric is basically a Malibu with a different drive train and an additional $10,000 to $15,000 increase in price. Since this vehicle represents about 1% of Chevy's business, without government forcing production, why build it? Ford has completely ended passenger car production in part because of increasingly onerous government regulation in favor of less regulated SUV's and light trucks.

                      I would say that anything short of truly mass mass transit is a dead end. That is, if a mass transit system can be replaced by driverless, networked, vehicles on demand at a reasonable price per use, the mass transit system will die simply because nobody will continue to use it. That is, light rail that runs at partial capacity and low capacity bus lines will no longer be competitive, not when you can call for a driverless vehicle to take you directly to a location and have another take you home. No waiting on a platform or bus stop. No having to walk to and from that stop to your destination.

                      As for exploiting such system's electrical power... Not too likely either. Some run on dedicated DC power that's not compatible with the charging systems of battery vehicles. Others would require power transformers to make the voltage correct. Then you have the problem of demand. The ampacity of the system would have to be sized for potential maximum demand to avoid shutdowns or damage to the system.

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post

                        This is a hydrogen fueling station in California. They made it as idiot proof as they could...

                        I agree. Handling H2 is no more inherently risky than handling propane.

                        Now if you want to mess with something volatile, try pure magnesium. That stuff is wild. It'd make a great energy source, however if we could only figure out how to break down the oxides without barbecuing ourselves in the process: way too little net energy return.
                        I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Originally posted by Gixxer86g View Post

                          That really depends. They're out there.

                          I don't know how far I want to push this discussion, as it would be " politically incorrect".
                          In PA, MA, VT, VA, and NY, I've seen way more enforcement than in NJ. Like what was that old geezer doing driving that school bus in Paramus when he decided to U-turn on I-80?

                          For PC, try this one on for size: 'bout 22 or 23 years ago, drove from Cape May to Secaucus in under 2hrs. What's that, about 120mi? I was flying. Didn't see any cops 'til the AC Expressway. After that, every gray haired black guy in a Lexus or a Cadillac was getting ticketed by a State Trooper, and I was still flying by at 110mph. Don't know how else to explain that other than selective enforcement on the part of the NJ State Police on the GS Parkway.
                          I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                            I bet it'd help if the street signs in NJ were in Spanish...
                            English, Spanish, Chinese: you could write those signs in any language you'd like, it still won't make a difference. NJ State law bans literacy.

                            Rimshot

                            My wife's niece from Berkeley NJ -- not too far from where they shot that terrible MTV show Jersey Shore -- got lost driving to my place last night, after using GPS and the written directions that I'd emailed her. For some people there's no hope.
                            I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Originally posted by Karri View Post
                              Tesla will fail, but electronic cars are here to stay. Most car companies are coming out with their own(AFAIK), and will mercilessly exploit the money Musk "wasted" on research/marketing.

                              On a side note: most trains/trolleys run on electricity, isn't that infrastructure that can be exploited?
                              Cars are only effective when they are on railroad tracks.
                              My worst jump story:
                              My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
                              As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
                              No lie.

                              ~
                              "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
                              -2 Commando Jumpmaster

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Originally posted by slick_miester View Post

                                English, Spanish, Chinese: you could write those signs in any language you'd like, it still won't make a difference. NJ State law bans literacy.

                                Rimshot

                                My wife's niece from Berkeley NJ -- not too far from where they shot that terrible MTV show Jersey Shore -- got lost driving to my place last night, after using GPS and the written directions that I'd emailed her. For some people there's no hope.
                                GPS can get whacked. I knew someone that was driving from DC to Baltimore and ended up in western Maryland. I use google maps when I need directions; it helps to have a general idea what route you're going.
                                My worst jump story:
                                My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
                                As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
                                No lie.

                                ~
                                "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
                                -2 Commando Jumpmaster

                                Comment

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