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SEARS Closing 72 Stores

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  • SEARS Closing 72 Stores

    Amidst the constant claims of financial recovery:
    Sears will close at least 72 more stores as sales plunge and losses mount.

    The list of store closings is due to be announced mid-day Thursday. Sears said it identified 100 non-profitable Sears and Kmart stores and picked 72 for closure "in the near future."

    The company closed a total of nearly 400 stores during the past 12 months, and now has a total of 894 left, including the 72 slated for closure. The two chains had a total of 3,500 U.S. stores between them when they merged in 2005.

    Sears said overall revenue fell 31% in the three months ending May 5. While most of that decline was due to previous store closings, sales fell 12% at the stores that remained open.
    http://money.cnn.com/2018/05/31/news...ses/index.html
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

  • #2
    I see that Duluth, MN is losing both a Sears and a Kmart. That's not good for a relatively small metro area.

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    • #3
      So? Sears was the Amazon of the early late 19th and early 20th century. You could literally buy anything from Sears. They sold cars and houses back then.

      A typical Sears kit home from their catalog:



      Well, Amazon is the new Sears and Sears is going the way of Woolworth's. Down the road in the coming decades some other new company will topple Amazon's dominance in the market. That's how these things work.

      For the small town and small metro area, Dollar General and Family Dollar have the correct marketing model. They've gone back to being small, inexpensive, general stores / department stores that carry staple items people always need.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
        So? Sears was the Amazon of the early late 19th and early 20th century. You could literally buy anything from Sears. They sold cars and houses back then.

        A typical Sears kit home from their catalog:



        Well, Amazon is the new Sears and Sears is going the way of Woolworth's. Down the road in the coming decades some other new company will topple Amazon's dominance in the market. That's how these things work.

        For the small town and small metro area, Dollar General and Family Dollar have the correct marketing model. They've gone back to being small, inexpensive, general stores / department stores that carry staple items people always need.
        Your Dollar store must be from a different planet than the ones I see everywhere,which sell whatever really cheap stuff is available in bulk lots for disposal.

        The economy is supposed to be improving, not continuing to fail. Do you really want to trust your life to an economy dependent on the internet to order and send you goods, when the entire power grid is as fragile as a crystal goblet? Have you ever been around an actual monopoly and seen what happens if it fails? Everything fails with it. Amazon is dangerously close to becoming a monopoly. It's only counterbalance is brick and mortar stores. Look at what WalMart did to neighborhood stores and businesses as only one example.

        It seems to me a lot like never wearing a lifejacket because your boat is supposed to float, so why bother? Not a good idea.


        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

          Your Dollar store must be from a different planet than the ones I see everywhere,which sell whatever really cheap stuff is available in bulk lots for disposal.

          The economy is supposed to be improving, not continuing to fail. Do you really want to trust your life to an economy dependent on the internet to order and send you goods, when the entire power grid is as fragile as a crystal goblet? Have you ever been around an actual monopoly and seen what happens if it fails? Everything fails with it. Amazon is dangerously close to becoming a monopoly. It's only counterbalance is brick and mortar stores. Look at what WalMart did to neighborhood stores and businesses as only one example.

          It seems to me a lot like never wearing a lifejacket because your boat is supposed to float, so why bother? Not a good idea.

          I specifically quoted the names of two chains. You find them in any smaller town these days:





          The two are sort of mini grocery and department stores geared to sell to smaller population bases.

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          • #6
            They are closing the K-Mart in Lake Charles! They opened it when I was 13, some 51 years ago. It was close enough for me to walk to. When I lived in Lake Charles, I went there often. I think having three WalMarts in Lake Charles and one in Sulphur, killed them. I am curious as to how long the Sears at the mall will last?

            Pruitt
            Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

            Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

            by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
              They are closing the K-Mart in Lake Charles! They opened it when I was 13, some 51 years ago. It was close enough for me to walk to. When I lived in Lake Charles, I went there often. I think having three WalMarts in Lake Charles and one in Sulphur, killed them. I am curious as to how long the Sears at the mall will last?

              Pruitt
              They need to downsize. That is, they can't compete with Amazon so they should focus on stuff that people need frequently and can't wait a day or three to have delivered. That's what Dollar General and Family Dollar do.

              I have to use the one in Oracle AZ when I'm there on occasion. They're cheaper and have a better selection than Circle K or 7-11 but they aren't as good as a "real" grocery store or something like WalMart. But, they're also 20 to 30 miles closer than those stores are in Catalina or Oro Valley. That's how they survive in smaller towns... By having stuff people need every day and a far better selection than a convivence store at a gas station.

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              • #8
                There's no more Sears in Canada first they shut down a few then each year some more until they're now all gone.
                It's starting the same pattern in the US the future is online shopping.

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                • #9
                  All things come to an end. This was the last Woolworth's store in the US:

                  https://www.globemiamitimes.com/the-...here-in-globe/


                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post

                    I specifically quoted the names of two chains. You find them in any smaller town these days:





                    The two are sort of mini grocery and department stores geared to sell to smaller population bases.
                    Yes, you do and we have them here. I have been in them and they are disposal outlets for overstocked and cheap foreign goods. They do not even come remotely close to replacing any big box store. And why do you think that el-cheapo outlets are so popular these days? Can it possibly be the increasing number of Americans who can't afford anything better?

                    Go in there with a standard family shopping list and see how many of your necessary staples and needs can be filled in one of these. Not many - I've tried a few times and gave it up, especially when I found out how cheap and flimsy the stuff they were selling was. Factory rejects, if you buy any tools, as I know from personal experience.
                    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                    • #11
                      MM--sit down because I agree 100% with your above post.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by johns624 View Post
                        MM--sit down because I agree 100% with your above post.
                        I am sitting......sort of.

                        BTW, when I first came to Colorado, Sears, JC Penny's, Montgomery Ward and Woolworths were all thriving businesses. The only thing left is WalMart, the Chinese Curse.

                        One of the most basic principles of consumerism is choice, and we are rapidly losing any semblance of it. Yes, it's inevitable at this time and place in our history, but it isn't "good" for the general public.

                        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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