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737 engine explodes in flight, 1 dead;

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  • #61
    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
    Of course, flying coach might make you wonder if dying wouldn't be such a bad alternative...
    That's the truth. My days of flying are over; if I can't drive there I'll wait for a VR tour.
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by johns624 View Post
      Flying is still safer than driving. Think of the hundreds of millions of people that US airlines have flown in the last eight years without a fatality.
      True, but a serious accident in an aircraft kills pretty much everyone aboard, often a fairly large number these days with the trend towards bigger and bigger passenger loads, and often happens far from any available aid.

      And air travel is actually becoming more dangerous due to the trend towards outsourcing maintenance and spare parts to less expensive foreign nations.

      Plus, I don't plan to die sitting in a cramped, uncomfortable chair will I am treated rudely by cabin attendants. At least in a car I am comfortable, relaxed and I have some control over events. I don't have to worry that the flight crew fell asleep or is drunk as has been the case several times in the past.
      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
        True, but a serious accident in an aircraft kills pretty much everyone aboard, often a fairly large number these days with the trend towards bigger and bigger passenger loads, and often happens far from any available aid.

        And air travel is actually becoming more dangerous due to the trend towards outsourcing maintenance and spare parts to less expensive foreign nations.

        Plus, I don't plan to die sitting in a cramped, uncomfortable chair will I am treated rudely by cabin attendants. At least in a car I am comfortable, relaxed and I have some control over events. I don't have to worry that the flight crew fell asleep or is drunk as has been the case several times in the past.
        You keep talking about outsourcing maintenance. I can't find anything about it, but my Google skills are lacking. Can you post a link?
        Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
          You keep talking about outsourcing maintenance. I can't find anything about it, but my Google skills are lacking. Can you post a link?
          There isn't one. I know A&P mechanics and they tell me that the paperwork for a repair takes longer than the repair itself. Every part has a paper trail from manufacturer, through distributor to installation on the plane. Some airlines do some heavy maintenance overseas but it's all highly regulated. One crash that can be blamed on inferior maintenance will bankrupt the company. Unlike some business jet operators, airlines don't cut corners.

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          • #65
            I want to point out two things.

            1) I read somewhere (and I forgot where) that the engine on this Southwest plane was not on the list of engines that were originally recommended to be inspected ultrasonically by manufacturer.

            2) One the same day a this engine explosion, there was an engine explosion on a Boeing 787 Dreamliner. This is following a series of engine problems and failures of the Roll-Royce Trent 1000 on the Boeing 787 and the RR Trent 900 on the Airbus 380.
            Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

            Prayers.

            BoRG

            http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

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            • #66
              Originally posted by Salinator View Post
              I want to point out two things.

              1) I read somewhere (and I forgot where) that the engine on this Southwest plane was not on the list of engines that were originally recommended to be inspected ultrasonically by manufacturer.

              2) One the same day a this engine explosion, there was an engine explosion on a Boeing 787 Dreamliner. This is following a series of engine problems and failures of the Roll-Royce Trent 1000 on the Boeing 787 and the RR Trent 900 on the Airbus 380.
              I am not sure if you try to lik 1 and 2 or if they are irrelevant.

              The issue with the Southwest problem is that this is not the first time it has happened. There has been actually an Airworthiness Directive (not emergency) in the previous year and Service Bulletins from the manufacturer because of fan blade metal fatigue problems. So, now that we have an additional case AND a DEATH, things are obviously taken more seriously. As for the engines that have to go or not through the test, the issue is more complicated because such determination is linked to the engine cycles in service. So, in crude terms, a service Bulletin or an Airworthiness Directive sets a maximum limit for performing such tests. So, an operator of an engine with fewer cycles in service than the one designated by the previously mentioned documents does not have to inspect it.
              Last edited by pamak; 22 Apr 18, 20:16.
              My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

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              • #67
                Probably sucked a rock on take off. Modern turbine blades are exquisite works of metallurgical art.

                https://www.americanscientist.org/ar...single-crystal
                Credo quia absurdum.


                Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
                  Probably sucked a rock on take off. Modern turbine blades are exquisite works of metallurgical art.

                  https://www.americanscientist.org/ar...single-crystal
                  Nope!

                  Such thing does not create signs of metal fatigue...
                  Of course, one can say that metal fatigue coexisted with other issues but we will have to wait for the final conclusions...
                  My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by pamak View Post
                    I am not sure if you try to lik 1 and 2 or if they are irrelevant.

                    The issue with the Southwest problem is that this is not the first time it has happened. There has been actually an Airworthiness Directive (not emergency) in the previous year and Service Bulletins from the manufacturer because of fan blade metal fatigue problems. So, now that we have an additional case AND a DEATH, things are obviously taken more seriously. As for the engines that have to go or not through the test, the issue is more complicated because such determination is linked to the engine cycles in service. So, in crude terms, a service Bulletin or an Airworthiness Directive sets a maximum limit for performing such tests. So, an operator of an engine with fewer cycles in service than the one designated by the previously mentioned documents does not have to inspect it.
                    What I'm pointing out is that the engine for this Southwest crisis is not on the list of engines that was recommended by the manufacturer to be tested after the earlier incident.

                    With the case of Rolls-Royce, it seems like they are now saying it is a design flaw and not a maintenance issue.

                    Those are all interesting developments. I have no position, only the bearer of news that I've read to promote more discussion. I do not need a lecture as you always seem to be so fond of giving.
                    Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                    Prayers.

                    BoRG

                    http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Salinator View Post
                      What I'm pointing out is that the engine for this Southwest crisis is not on the list of engines that was recommended by the manufacturer after the earlier incident.

                      With the case of Rolls-Royce, it seems like they are now saying it is a design flaw and not a maintenance issue.

                      Those are all interesting developments. I have no position, only the bearer of news that I've read to promote more discussion. I do not need a lecture as you always seem to be so fond of giving.
                      If you take my reply as a lecture, I will stop answering your questions and everybody will be happy.
                      My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by pamak View Post
                        If you take my reply as a lecture, I will stop answering your questions and everybody will be happy.
                        I think you are really smart and must be a really nice guy in person. But sometimes you do come across in a way that it may be wise for me let it be known I am not taking a position, and therefor no need for you to rescue me from that supposed position.
                        Last edited by Salinator; 23 Apr 18, 13:14.
                        Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                        Prayers.

                        BoRG

                        http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by phil74501 View Post
                          Other countries, besides America, make aircraft?

                          I know that...and bloody good ones at that....

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                          • #73
                            Originally posted by johns624 View Post
                            There isn't one. I know A&P mechanics and they tell me that the paperwork for a repair takes longer than the repair itself. Every part has a paper trail from manufacturer, through distributor to installation on the plane. Some airlines do some heavy maintenance overseas but it's all highly regulated. One crash that can be blamed on inferior maintenance will bankrupt the company. Unlike some business jet operators, airlines don't cut corners.
                            There have been numerous articles and even a couple of TV documentaries on the outsourcing of airline maintenance.

                            Five seconds on Bing yields this as the first of many: https://www.oig.dot.gov/sites/defaul..._AV2008090.pdf

                            Google is your problem, not a lack of information.
                            Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                            • #74
                              NTSB has released a preliminary report on the fan blade failure on Flight 1380.
                              A preliminary National Transportation Safety Board report on the fatal Southwest Airlines accident on April 17 has revealed that traditional engine-checking protocols didn’t go far enough to prevent a catastrophe,
                              A rather decent article for a change.

                              https://www.yahoo.com/news/southwest...145300213.html

                              Tuebor

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                              • #75
                                More problems for SouthWest;
                                Southwest flight loses pressure, makes emergency landing
                                https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/so...d08?li=BBnb7Kz
                                TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                                “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                                Present Current Events are the Future's History

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