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  • Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
    The USA of the 1940s has to be compared to other countries in the world.
    Then wouldn't comparing like-with-like make more sense? Ethiopia was a was a desperately backwards and underdeveloped country after the end of WW2. She had just experienced Italian invasion and occupation -- including arguably WW2's only known use of chemical weapons on the battlefield. If you want to compare the US in that era to something, compare her to Canada, or Sweden -- not some bombed out mess of a country. That's like comparing Stephen Hawking's athleticism to Michael Jordan's.

    Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
    Arguably the USA was the most humane country in the world in the 1940s.
    Possibly. One can certainly make that argument. Nevertheless, some very unpleasant stuff was occurring here that had no counterpart elsewhere, and it was happening with some regularity. That has to enter into the equation, as well, and deliberately omitting such makes for rather poor history indeed.

    Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
    The very fact is the divorce rate among blacks and whites was far lower in the 1940s compared to today
    Back then, when marital rape was still legal? When a women could not work outside the home except as a secretary, a school teacher, or a nurse? When a woman had to produce cause if she wished to petition for divorce, and if granted, more often than not lost custody of her children in the process? That's your metric for familial contentment?

    Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
    even with the segregation many blacks had dignity and a high paying job in the 1940s.
    Since blacks overwhelmingly made less money than whites, since very few colleges and universities accepted black applicants, since blacks could pretty much be arrested based on nothing more than any cop's whim, where were these blacks who enjoyed "dignity and high paying jobs"? They didn't even get the right to vote in many states until 1957, fer cryin' out loud.

    How much "dignity" could have been afforded blacks, when a guy who said stuff like this:

    If we sit with Negroes at our tables, if we attend social functions with them as our social equals, if we disregard segregation in all other relations, is it then possible that we maintain it fixedly in the marriage of the South's Saxon sons and daughters? The answer must be "No." By the absolute denial of social equality to the Negro, the barriers between the races are firm and strong. But if the middle wall of the social partition should be broken down, then the mingling of the tides of life would surely begin. It would be a slow process, but the result would be the same. And though the process be gradual, it would be none the less irresistible and inevitable. The lower strata of the white population would probably feel the first effects, and within the foreseeable future the middle and upper classes would be invaded. Then, the Southern White race, the Southern Caucasian, would be irretrievably doomed.

    "Take Your Choice, Separation or Mongrelization," by Theodore G Bilbo, courtesy Wikiquote, 1946
    could have been elected to the US Senate -- while the dust of Fascism and the Holocaust was still not settled -- where, according to Robert Caro, he would screech "ni**er" at the the top of his lungs? Can you possibly imagine that the objects of his vitriol were afforded any dignity at all?

    Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
    Unlike fake phony dems and gop folk in Buffalo, I see the inner cities, I talk with older African Americans who tell me the old days were better then what the dump of a country is today
    Old people always put a shine on the past. What they're celebrating is a world as they knew it before it changed, and mostly, they're celebrating their youth. Had me an old German uncle, so family lore went: he escaped Germany because he did not want to live under a Prussian boot. Sent two sons to fight the Kaiser in WW1. By the early '30s, however, he started waxing all nostalgic for Germany, and praised Hitler for "making Germany great again." He wasn't a Nazi, though: he was just an old fart going senile. It's what old folks do.

    Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
    Unions are great, anti Americans oppose unions.
    Are you saying that sabotaging production is "American"? Are you saying that strangling black men for selling loose cigarettes is "American"? Is pederasty "American"? They must be, because various unions have actively advocated just that.

    Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
    Yes like in any group or business some union people are bad, but Unions are needed to fight back agaisnt Conservative greedy politicians who are trying to destroy our country.
    Ohh. Move-on.org talking points. How novel.

    Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
    Buffalo and other major cities used to be boomtowns
    So was Petra at one time. Times change. Perhaps you hadn't noticed.

    Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
    now usury anti American credit card collection companies lead the way in Buffalo.
    No doubt all run by evil, hook-nosed Shylock's.

    Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
    Buffalo used to have 50,000 good factory jobs, all middle class Buffalonians support what Im saying.
    Same could be said of every town up and down the Mohawk. "Schenectady lights the world," remember? Well those days are long over, and they're never coming back, so there's no point in pining for the past, now is there.

    Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
    Maybe get off your ass and look up some real history good friend.
    Try taking your own advice. Or perhaps you can answer -- candidly -- at least one question that I pose. Get off your treadmill already. Try this one: why does the City of Schenectady assess $19,000/yr property tax on what can generously be described as marginal properties? Do you think that that's at all consistent with a city that's desperately in need of jobs, and people?
    I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

    Comment


    • Originally posted by pamak View Post
      I will not even go to the social issues in the 1940s...

      In the 1940s, US had "dignified" jobs simply because it was the only kid in the block. The infrastructure of every other competitor had received massive blows.
      The entire world faced social issues in the 1940s, can you put up any country in the world in 1940 that was morally better compared to the USA, only answer I can think of is England under Churchill.

      Japan and Germany still produced raw materials during the war though, as did the UK and USSR. When it comes to the big 3 allies of WW2, black and white men and women were pivotal in helping the allies win WW2 via working at the factories here in the USA.
      Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
      Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

      George S Patton

      Comment


      • Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
        Then wouldn't comparing like-with-like make more sense? Ethiopia was a was a desperately backwards and underdeveloped country after the end of WW2. She had just experienced Italian invasion and occupation -- including arguably WW2's only known use of chemical weapons on the battlefield. If you want to compare the US in that era to something, compare her to Canada, or Sweden -- not some bombed out mess of a country. That's like comparing Stephen Hawking's athleticism to Michael Jordan's.



        Possibly. One can certainly make that argument. Nevertheless, some very unpleasant stuff was occurring here that had no counterpart elsewhere, and it was happening with some regularity. That has to enter into the equation, as well, and deliberately omitting such makes for rather poor history indeed.



        Back then, when marital rape was still legal? When a women could not work outside the home except as a secretary, a school teacher, or a nurse? When a woman had to produce cause if she wished to petition for divorce, and if granted, more often than not lost custody of her children in the process? That's your metric for familial contentment?



        Since blacks overwhelmingly made less money than whites, since very few colleges and universities accepted black applicants, since blacks could pretty much be arrested based on nothing more than any cop's whim, where were these blacks who enjoyed "dignity and high paying jobs"? They didn't even get the right to vote in many states until 1957, fer cryin' out loud.

        How much "dignity" could have been afforded blacks, when a guy who said stuff like this:



        could have been elected to the US Senate -- while the dust of Fascism and the Holocaust was still not settled -- where, according to Robert Caro, he would screech "ni**er" at the the top of his lungs? Can you possibly imagine that the objects of his vitriol were afforded any dignity at all?



        Old people always put a shine on the past. What they're celebrating is a world as they knew it before it changed, and mostly, they're celebrating their youth. Had me an old German uncle, so family lore went: he escaped Germany because he did not want to live under a Prussian boot. Sent two sons to fight the Kaiser in WW1. By the early '30s, however, he started waxing all nostalgic for Germany, and praised Hitler for "making Germany great again." He wasn't a Nazi, though: he was just an old fart going senile. It's what old folks do.



        Are you saying that sabotaging production is "American"? Are you saying that strangling black men for selling loose cigarettes is "American"? Is pederasty "American"? They must be, because various unions have actively advocated just that.



        Ohh. Move-on.org talking points. How novel.



        So was Petra at one time. Times change. Perhaps you hadn't noticed.



        No doubt all run by evil, hook-nosed Shylock's.



        Same could be said of every town up and down the Mohawk. "Schenectady lights the world," remember? Well those days are long over, and they're never coming back, so there's no point in pining for the past, now is there.



        Try taking your own advice. Or perhaps you can answer -- candidly -- at least one question that I pose. Get off your treadmill already. Try this one: why does the City of Schenectady assess $19,000/yr property tax on what can generously be described as marginal properties? Do you think that that's at all consistent with a city that's desperately in need of jobs, and people?
        And to Slick miester, your missing the point on a few things. Im reading all your posts and the main issue your missing is the jobs crisis facing our country.

        Also more needs to be said about how Jews and Africans of the past acted, its not all white Christian men whom were the bad guys. You bring up the N word, and you apparently are talking about mistreatment of Jews , well the facts are blacks and Jews like anyone else has a history of good and bad.. I dont feel you are being fair here in your approach.

        In the 1940s women were at the workplace. In the 1940s black folks worked alongside whites at Ford Motor Company, this occurred as early as 1928. To have such a high paying job is dignity. The days of a man being able to go out of high school and into the factory have sort of diminished..

        The Middle class has been falling since the 1940s, the divorce rate has been up since this time, Prisons have grown, taxes have grown but wages have stagnated. The country today is in a very bad shape we need to go back to the old ways of where the middle class had great success The numbers simply do not lie, no matter the non sequiturs you bring up, the issue is Jobs and it is proven for example that Buffalo used to have 50,000 good middle class jobs that are now gone, and other cities like Detroit have suffered in a similar manner.
        Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
        Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

        George S Patton

        Comment


        • What I am saying is merely a relay of what good and hardworking men and women of the inner cities are saying. Some Americans simply are unaware of the struggles facing inner city communities that once thrived. I have a diverse work experience here in the USA. So what I am saying is influenced by for example the 18 year old African American man and 60 year old African American lady I know of... The young man wont leave his house at night to walk the streets because he says its not safe on and around Bailey ave... The lady says thugs have threatened her neighborhood and that her neighborhood(by Niagara street in Buffalo) it was better in the 1970s.
          Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
          Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

          George S Patton

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
            And to Slick miester, your missing the point on a few things. Im reading all your posts and the main issue your missing is the jobs crisis facing our country.
            It's not a jobs crisis. It's an education crisis, and it's a workforce crisis.

            Regarding an education crisis: today's workplace requires decided technical knowledge and skill, knowledge and skill that can only be acquired through education, especially in math and science. over the last fifty years, despite spending more per pupil than any other nation, the US consistently does no better than middle-of-the-pack when compared to other, similarly developed nations. In this increasingly technical age, subject as it clearly is to Moore's Law, falling behind Germany, Japan, RoK, PRC, Italy, and Canada, in math and science education is not a winning formula.

            Consider this, one man sitting in front of a bank of computer terminals can do more work in a day than ten men sweating it out on the factory floor. Automation is a fact, and has been a fact, for a very long time. With the advent of the "3-D printer," a revolution in manufacturing is definitely imminent. How can people with only high school educations fitted only for assembly line work compete in this environment? Is it even conceivable? Thomas Friedman's The World is Flat is really a must-read for any luddite, 'cause you can't turn back progress any more than you can hold back a flood with your finger in the dyke.

            Now that we've addressed the education crisis, let's examine the workforce crisis. It's been an article of faith that any hard-working American can send his children to college. To that end, millions worked in the very factories that you've described, saving and borrowing to send their kids to college. By and large they've succeeded: their offspring will not have to work in factories or farms or docks in in order to obtain their daily bread. Nowadays, something like 40% of all working-aged American have some kind of higher degree. Do you think that these people spent all of that money and put in four years' worth of time and effort just to work in a factory? Even at the very depths of the recent "Great Recession," with Zuccotti Square loaded to the gills with young people protesting their college loans, thousands of positions in the trucking industry went unfilled for lack of applicants -- even when the company was willing to pay the applicant while he studied for his CDL! Farmers can't attract and hold native-born Americans, 'cause they're completely unaccustomed to that kind of hard work. (You're Upstate: you should know that.) Our workforce today is entirely unsuitable for work. It's as simple as that. Film majors are being graduated in bunches -- but good luck finding an engineer, or even an accountant.

            So if you're trying to start up a new venture, given the state of the American workforce, is this really the place where you'd want to plant your stake?

            And yet for all of that blather, you still are ducking my question: why does the City of Schenectady assess such ruinous property taxes for otherwise marginal properties? If you can answer that, then this debate will end, in an instant. So keep shucking and jivin'. :rolleyes;
            I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

            Comment


            • I'm absolutely certain of one thing: I will not discuss guns with young people who eat detergent and are confused about which restroom to use.

              Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                I'm absolutely certain of one thing: I will not discuss guns with young people who eat detergent and are confused about which restroom to use.

                Life is too short to waste time on the willfully ignorant.
                Credo quia absurdum.


                Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

                Comment


                • Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
                  It's not a jobs crisis. It's an education crisis, and it's a workforce crisis.

                  Regarding an education crisis: today's workplace requires decided technical knowledge and skill, knowledge and skill that can only be acquired through education, especially in math and science. over the last fifty years, despite spending more per pupil than any other nation, the US consistently does no better than middle-of-the-pack when compared to other, similarly developed nations. In this increasingly technical age, subject as it clearly is to Moore's Law, falling behind Germany, Japan, RoK, PRC, Italy, and Canada, in math and science education is not a winning formula.

                  Consider this, one man sitting in front of a bank of computer terminals can do more work in a day than ten men sweating it out on the factory floor. Automation is a fact, and has been a fact, for a very long time. With the advent of the "3-D printer," a revolution in manufacturing is definitely imminent. How can people with only high school educations fitted only for assembly line work compete in this environment? Is it even conceivable? Thomas Friedman's The World is Flat is really a must-read for any luddite, 'cause you can't turn back progress any more than you can hold back a flood with your finger in the dyke.

                  Now that we've addressed the education crisis, let's examine the workforce crisis. It's been an article of faith that any hard-working American can send his children to college. To that end, millions worked in the very factories that you've described, saving and borrowing to send their kids to college. By and large they've succeeded: their offspring will not have to work in factories or farms or docks in in order to obtain their daily bread. Nowadays, something like 40% of all working-aged American have some kind of higher degree. Do you think that these people spent all of that money and put in four years' worth of time and effort just to work in a factory? Even at the very depths of the recent "Great Recession," with Zuccotti Square loaded to the gills with young people protesting their college loans, thousands of positions in the trucking industry went unfilled for lack of applicants -- even when the company was willing to pay the applicant while he studied for his CDL! Farmers can't attract and hold native-born Americans, 'cause they're completely unaccustomed to that kind of hard work. (You're Upstate: you should know that.) Our workforce today is entirely unsuitable for work. It's as simple as that. Film majors are being graduated in bunches -- but good luck finding an engineer, or even an accountant.

                  So if you're trying to start up a new venture, given the state of the American workforce, is this really the place where you'd want to plant your stake?

                  And yet for all of that blather, you still are ducking my question: why does the City of Schenectady assess such ruinous property taxes for otherwise marginal properties? If you can answer that, then this debate will end, in an instant. So keep shucking and jivin'. :rolleyes;
                  No kidding. In addition, the idea that giving kids a liberal arts (versus STEM heavy) education is good preparation for adult life and employment is definitely becoming a thing of the past. While it's nice to know "stuff" about art, history, literature, etc., without a firm grasp of math, science, and technology, they're largely doomed in the business world for employment.

                  As for your question: Schenectady is a victim of previous success. It obviously was trying to squeeze more golden eggs from the goose and strangled it in the process. It's hardly alone in the rust belt for doing that.

                  Comment


                  • The education crisis is a bit skewed. The countries we are ranked with do not include the handicapped students in their results and we do. Many send their best students into college prep schools, while we allow our students to choose their own curriculum path. We send a lot of athletes with scholastic problems to college prep schools as well. Many of these countries send students to a vocational type curriculum at a younger age than we do as well.

                    I met many foreign students at college that were complaining about having to take non-scholastic courses they would not take back "home".

                    Pruitt
                    Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                    Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                    by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
                      It's not a jobs crisis. It's an education crisis, and it's a workforce crisis.

                      Regarding an education crisis: today's workplace requires decided technical knowledge and skill, knowledge and skill that can only be acquired through education, especially in math and science. over the last fifty years, despite spending more per pupil than any other nation, the US consistently does no better than middle-of-the-pack when compared to other, similarly developed nations. In this increasingly technical age, subject as it clearly is to Moore's Law, falling behind Germany, Japan, RoK, PRC, Italy, and Canada, in math and science education is not a winning formula.

                      Consider this, one man sitting in front of a bank of computer terminals can do more work in a day than ten men sweating it out on the factory floor. Automation is a fact, and has been a fact, for a very long time. With the advent of the "3-D printer," a revolution in manufacturing is definitely imminent. How can people with only high school educations fitted only for assembly line work compete in this environment? Is it even conceivable? Thomas Friedman's The World is Flat is really a must-read for any luddite, 'cause you can't turn back progress any more than you can hold back a flood with your finger in the dyke.

                      Now that we've addressed the education crisis, let's examine the workforce crisis. It's been an article of faith that any hard-working American can send his children to college. To that end, millions worked in the very factories that you've described, saving and borrowing to send their kids to college. By and large they've succeeded: their offspring will not have to work in factories or farms or docks in in order to obtain their daily bread. Nowadays, something like 40% of all working-aged American have some kind of higher degree. Do you think that these people spent all of that money and put in four years' worth of time and effort just to work in a factory? Even at the very depths of the recent "Great Recession," with Zuccotti Square loaded to the gills with young people protesting their college loans, thousands of positions in the trucking industry went unfilled for lack of applicants -- even when the company was willing to pay the applicant while he studied for his CDL! Farmers can't attract and hold native-born Americans, 'cause they're completely unaccustomed to that kind of hard work. (You're Upstate: you should know that.) Our workforce today is entirely unsuitable for work. It's as simple as that. Film majors are being graduated in bunches -- but good luck finding an engineer, or even an accountant.

                      So if you're trying to start up a new venture, given the state of the American workforce, is this really the place where you'd want to plant your stake?

                      And yet for all of that blather, you still are ducking my question: why does the City of Schenectady assess such ruinous property taxes for otherwise marginal properties? If you can answer that, then this debate will end, in an instant. So keep shucking and jivin'. :rolleyes;
                      Im not ducking anything, you have brought up the City of Schenectady. This thread is about the American past compared to the American present.

                      Well Americans also went to College in the 1940s, many of them did. Difference back in the day was that folks who did not go to college could still make good money at a factory job. College is not meant for everyone.

                      The very fact is that men can not get the types of good paying factory jobs right out of high school like they used to be able to get. That is a massive issue. Not everyone is meant for college, what a disastrous society we would have if College was needed to make 50k +. That type of society is dangerous, greedy, cunning, and a threat to the civilized world.

                      Automation, Robots, and technology are great things...but they dont have to take over the jobs of our fellow Americans.. Corporate greed indeed is a threat to the USA, any American willing to bring in a robot to say Ford or Chevy to replace the jobs of ten Americans....how in the world does such a man sleep at night...that is a disgrace.

                      Look at our country in the 1930s-1960s...right out of high school a man black or white could get a factory job and be set for life. If your response to the issues at hands is to bring up the tax issues of one city, or bring up college education, well that wont address the downfall of the American middle class. You bring up property taxes, well if Americans in Schenectady could get a good factory job without having to pour so much time and money into college, the high property taxes would be somewhat offset by a good middle class job. Its a straightforward issue, for example the Steel industry needs to be brought back to its glory days, look around you there is steel all over the place, steel is still a good commodity so one way to help the country is bring back 30$ an hour steel jobs that do not require a college degree but that might come with on the job training.

                      Btw from 1962 - blacks and whites together having a good time,
                      Last edited by Stonewall_Jack; 28 Feb 18, 21:40.
                      Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
                      Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

                      George S Patton

                      Comment


                      • It might take masses of workers across the country forming picket lines and making outright demands to unions and employers.. Our ancestors white and black protested for improved worker rights after all.

                        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strike_action
                        Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
                        Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

                        George S Patton

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
                          Im not ducking anything, you have brought up the City of Schenectady.
                          I asked you a question about a city in your region, in many ways very similar to your city. Why don't you just answer the question already?

                          Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
                          This thread is about the American past compared to the American present.
                          And the present doesn't come off so badly.

                          Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
                          Well Americans also went to College in the 1940s, many of them did.
                          The big push for university enrollment was the GI Bill. That kicked in after WW2 ended.

                          Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
                          Difference back in the day was that folks who did not go to college could still make good money at a factory job.
                          Tue enough -- but you're overlooking the fact that today's factory requires more from its employees than did yesterday's.

                          Or are you suggesting that we banish the computer from the workplace?

                          Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
                          College is not meant for everyone.
                          No argument there either -- but that fact still does not render mid-20th century "smokestack" economics either viable, or especially desirable.

                          For a suitable analogy, consider the street-sweeper machines that are commonplace in towns and cities from coast-to-coast.



                          Those came to dominate city streets in the 1950s, so I am led to understand. Prior to their introduction, sanitation departments employed thousands of people as street-sweepers: armed with brooms and trash cans and whatnot.



                          What you're advocating is that our municipalities do away with the street-sweeping vehicles and rehire thousands of street-sweepers -- so that the poorly-educated can have jobs. Do you understand how ridiculous that sounds?

                          Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
                          The very fact is that men can not get the types of good paying factory jobs right out of high school like they used to be able to get. That is a massive issue. Not everyone is meant for college, what a disastrous society we would have if College was needed to make 50k +. That type of society is dangerous, greedy, cunning, and a threat to the civilized world.
                          Just out of curiosity, if I may ask, in what field are you employed?

                          Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
                          Automation, Robots, and technology are great things...but they dont have to take over the jobs of our fellow Americans.. Corporate greed indeed is a threat to the USA, any American willing to bring in a robot to say Ford or Chevy to replace the jobs of ten Americans....how in the world does such a man sleep at night...that is a disgrace.
                          I'll tell you what: the day that you're willing to pay more for your purchases on the basis that it will keep deadbeats employed, you let me know. Please, feel free to lead by example. I'll be awaiting your notification.

                          Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
                          Look at our country in the 1930s-1960s...right out of high school a man black or white could get a factory job and be set for life.
                          In Detroit, yeah. In Tupelo Mississippi, no. Like as not he was a sharecropper, just like his daddy before him.

                          That's assuming that the Rust mechanical cotton picker didn't terminate his vocation first.

                          Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
                          If your response to the issues at hands is to bring up the tax issues of one city, or bring up college education, well that wont address the downfall of the American middle class.
                          So if the middle class is being squeezed on the one side by a mind-bogglingly underperforming public education system and on the other by ruinous taxes, you don't see the conundrum faced by the very people for whom you claim to be stumping?

                          Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post
                          You bring up property taxes, well if Americans in Schenectady could get a good factory job without having to pour so much time and money into college, the high property taxes would be somewhat offset by a good middle class job. Its a straightforward issue
                          It sure is. It was a matter of public policy in many municipalities throughout the state during the 1960s and '70s to render both light and heavy industry unfeasible in this state. To that end ruinous taxes were enacted. Yes: the powers-that-were wanted the factories to close. Sounds crazy, right. Well, that's what they did. But that was then. How, in the here-and-now, can a city hope to attract employers if they impose outrageous taxes?
                          I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

                          Comment


                          • By the 1840s, Manchester, England, had become known as the first industrial city. Manchester was home to the first passenger rail service in the world and had one of the largest textile industries of that time. As a result, the robust metropolis was said to be Englandís unhealthiest place to live.[1] In response to this unsanitary environment, Joseph Whitworth invented the mechanical street sweeper. The street sweeper was designed with the primary objective to remove trash from streets in order to maintain aesthetic goals and safety
                            "Ask not what your country can do for you"

                            Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

                            youíre entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

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