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The Baby Boom Generation (50s-60s-70s) and School Shootings

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  • #16
    Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
    Familiarity. I'm sure that WW1 vets plucked up all the surplus Springfield '03s, just as WW2 vets absorbed the surplus M1 Garands. For any one whose been in the service in the last fifty years, the AR platform is very familiar. We're all comfortable with it, warts and all. I don't think that I'd be so comfortable with an AK-type weapon.
    It could very well be our blanket and pacifier
    "I don't discuss sitting presidents," Mattis tells NPR in an interview. "I believe that you owe a period of quiet."

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    • #17
      Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
      Oh, I get it! The visual appearance of the gun is causing school violence.... Riiiggghhhtt...
      That's what I'm assuming is going on with some of these posters. It's so evil that just looking at it causes you to kill people.

      As for other threads and posts lately...it is really, really hard to keep posts civil when faced with such anti-gun stupidity.
      The First Amendment applies to SMS, Emails, Blogs, online news, the Fourth applies to your cell phone, computer, and your car, but the Second only applies to muskets?

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Mystikeye View Post
        --------------
        Beating isn't the point, its discipline that is the point. Discipline teaches respect if not fear of consequences of unacceptable behavior. That is the problem with todays society is there is no parenting and the schools are too petrified of law suits to discipline a child. It aint perfect but its better than anything else I've seen lately.
        Yes, I understand the point but the issue is still the same. I do not think the Europeans (at least western Europeans) are not disciplinarians or more strict than the Americans.
        My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Hida Akechi View Post
          So?
          The mentally ill should not have guns.
          "Ask not what your country can do for you"

          Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

          you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

          Comment


          • #20
            What has changed since the 50's - 70's is how we raise children in general.

            There are far, far more single parent households, usually headed by a female. In addition, such households generally have much lower incomes.

            Absentee and derelict fathers are far more common, particularly in regard to the single parent household.

            Daycare, and other extra-family means of child care are the norm today, rather than the exception. Everything from "Latch key kids" to simply having your children in daycare, kindergarten, etc., is now common. Parental supervision has seriously declined.

            "Free range kids" are no more. Back in the 50's to 70's kids roamed their neighborhoods on bikes, played in the streets, and generally went exploring on their own. Allowing kids to do that today gets parents arrested. Instead, today everything has to have parental supervision.

            Corporal punishment, however mild, is now illegal. About the only thing left for parents is "Time out," and that is often an ineffective joke. When parents have no real means to control their children, but are expected to anyway, there's a huge issue. The same goes for teachers and other adults. Often today, the first time there's any real level of parental control is when the police become involved.

            Any sort of play that involves even the mildest forms of aggressive activity or implies violence has been made forbidden or outright illegal. Forget playing tag on a playground at school, or "crack the whip." Those involve physical roughness. The idea of something like boys playing "War" or "Cowboys and Indians" would be seen as abhorrent today.

            All of this is really new to society. There was never a past generation where kids were raised in a "safe" environment and so stifled in being able to do things on their own as they are today.

            So, accessible firearms haven't changed much in the last century. Schools and such really haven't changed in terms of design and content of classes on the whole either. The one thing that has dramatically changed is how we are raising children since about the 80's or 90's. I would argue that is likely the problem and until we eradicate the current trends in child raising, we're going to see more not less of this sort of crap going on.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by III Corps View Post
              Keep in mind AR-15 style weapons were not available while you were growing up.
              I bought my first one in 1964, over 50 years ago a Colt SP1!
              Trying hard to be the Man, that my Dog believes I am!

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                What has changed since the 50's - 70's is how we raise children in general.

                There are far, far more single parent households, usually headed by a female. In addition, such households generally have much lower incomes.

                Absentee and derelict fathers are far more common, particularly in regard to the single parent household.

                Daycare, and other extra-family means of child care are the norm today, rather than the exception. Everything from "Latch key kids" to simply having your children in daycare, kindergarten, etc., is now common. Parental supervision has seriously declined.

                "Free range kids" are no more. Back in the 50's to 70's kids roamed their neighborhoods on bikes, played in the streets, and generally went exploring on their own. Allowing kids to do that today gets parents arrested. Instead, today everything has to have parental supervision.

                Corporal punishment, however mild, is now illegal. About the only thing left for parents is "Time out," and that is often an ineffective joke. When parents have no real means to control their children, but are expected to anyway, there's a huge issue. The same goes for teachers and other adults. Often today, the first time there's any real level of parental control is when the police become involved.

                Any sort of play that involves even the mildest forms of aggressive activity or implies violence has been made forbidden or outright illegal. Forget playing tag on a playground at school, or "crack the whip." Those involve physical roughness. The idea of something like boys playing "War" or "Cowboys and Indians" would be seen as abhorrent today.

                All of this is really new to society. There was never a past generation where kids were raised in a "safe" environment and so stifled in being able to do things on their own as they are today.

                So, accessible firearms haven't changed much in the last century. Schools and such really haven't changed in terms of design and content of classes on the whole either. The one thing that has dramatically changed is how we are raising children since about the 80's or 90's. I would argue that is likely the problem and until we eradicate the current trends in child raising, we're going to see more not less of this sort of crap going on.


                Back when I was young old people spent time with their grandchildren instead of posting snowflake memes all over the internet. Now that I think of it, they never really bought into that nostalgia nonsense either. Probably because they knew very well things were worse back then.

                How can argue that there is no parental supervision and at the same time say kids are not allowed to do anything? Using violence as the only means to control anything is probably how you get school shooters. Their chosen punishment on society doesn't seem particulary lenient...

                And kids today play zombie shooters and war games, and yes still run around pretending tree branches are machineguns and bazookas. I know this since I am looking after my nephew who did that today.

                Dunno how daycare is supposed to make kids worse. Dunno where the kids are supposed to be if parents are working anyways. At home alone?

                I was born in 80's, and was 90's kid. I remember roaming around the old Soviet half collapsed bunkers, without adult supervision. I suspect you are wrong.
                Wisdom is personal

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                  What has changed since the 50's - 70's is how we raise children in general.

                  There are far, far more single parent households, usually headed by a female. In addition, such households generally have much lower incomes.

                  Absentee and derelict fathers are far more common, particularly in regard to the single parent household.

                  Daycare, and other extra-family means of child care are the norm today, rather than the exception. Everything from "Latch key kids" to simply having your children in daycare, kindergarten, etc., is now common. Parental supervision has seriously declined.

                  "Free range kids" are no more. Back in the 50's to 70's kids roamed their neighborhoods on bikes, played in the streets, and generally went exploring on their own. Allowing kids to do that today gets parents arrested. Instead, today everything has to have parental supervision.

                  Corporal punishment, however mild, is now illegal. About the only thing left for parents is "Time out," and that is often an ineffective joke. When parents have no real means to control their children, but are expected to anyway, there's a huge issue. The same goes for teachers and other adults. Often today, the first time there's any real level of parental control is when the police become involved.

                  Any sort of play that involves even the mildest forms of aggressive activity or implies violence has been made forbidden or outright illegal. Forget playing tag on a playground at school, or "crack the whip." Those involve physical roughness. The idea of something like boys playing "War" or "Cowboys and Indians" would be seen as abhorrent today.

                  All of this is really new to society. There was never a past generation where kids were raised in a "safe" environment and so stifled in being able to do things on their own as they are today.

                  So, accessible firearms haven't changed much in the last century. Schools and such really haven't changed in terms of design and content of classes on the whole either. The one thing that has dramatically changed is how we are raising children since about the 80's or 90's. I would argue that is likely the problem and until we eradicate the current trends in child raising, we're going to see more not less of this sort of crap going on.
                  Get a load of this monster...

                  A PASSENGER has documented his nightmarish flight after a “demonic” child screamed for the entire eight-hour trip.
                  The footage shows the three-year-old climbing over seats and screaming before the flight from Germany to New York had even taken off.
                  The video was uploaded to YouTube by Shane Townley who wrote: “Watch as this kid runs and screams throughout the entire flight while the mother does little to nothing to stop him. 3 years old on a 8 hour flight from Germany to Newark NJ. He never quits!”
                  Now most people could understand that being in a plane might be stressful for a young child and it could take him a while to settle down.
                  But it eventually became clear to passengers that this kid wasn’t going to be happy sitting down and watching a movie, as he continued his rampage for nearly the whole trip.


                  http://www.news.com.au/travel/travel...ee12a1081994d3
                  Credo quia absurdum.


                  Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
                    Get a load of this monster...

                    A PASSENGER has documented his nightmarish flight after a “demonic” child screamed for the entire eight-hour trip.
                    The footage shows the three-year-old climbing over seats and screaming before the flight from Germany to New York had even taken off.
                    The video was uploaded to YouTube by Shane Townley who wrote: “Watch as this kid runs and screams throughout the entire flight while the mother does little to nothing to stop him. 3 years old on a 8 hour flight from Germany to Newark NJ. He never quits!”
                    Now most people could understand that being in a plane might be stressful for a young child and it could take him a while to settle down.
                    But it eventually became clear to passengers that this kid wasn’t going to be happy sitting down and watching a movie, as he continued his rampage for nearly the whole trip.


                    http://www.news.com.au/travel/travel...ee12a1081994d3
                    There was a time when that wouldn't have been tolerated for a minute by not just the parent, but every adult on the plane. They'd of put that kid in his place and made it clear they "would give him something to scream about..."

                    But, today, anyone doing something like that is libel to be arrested. Problem? Methinks so.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                      There was a time when that wouldn't have been tolerated for a minute by not just the parent, but every adult on the plane. They'd of put that kid in his place and made it clear they "would give him something to scream about..."

                      But, today, anyone doing something like that is libel to be arrested. Problem? Methinks so.
                      I knew another of these demon children long ago, never had any discipline till he started choking the life out of another kid. He got some after that...
                      Credo quia absurdum.


                      Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
                        I knew another of these demon children long ago, never had any discipline till he started choking the life out of another kid. He got some after that...
                        This is a problem. With the kid on the plane, given the legal aspects of the situation, I'd have told a flight attendant that the crew needs to do something as the kid is obviously not in compliance with FAA, etc., regulations and if they refuse or fail to act, I'm going to file a formal complaint with the FAA and sue the airline both for my own inconvenience on the flight as well as the potential endangerment the kid represents.

                        I'd do it in such a way as to get other passengers on the same train of thought. I bet that would have gotten action.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Karri View Post
                          If you're trying to make me laugh, you've succeeded.

                          Originally posted by Karri View Post
                          I was born in 80's, and was 90's kid. I remember roaming around the old Soviet half collapsed bunkers, without adult supervision. I suspect you are wrong.
                          Just want to pick on this for a moment. Back in 1979, the US suffered two high-profile child disappearances: Adam Walsh and Eton Patz. They were really frightening cases, because in both instances the children simply disappeared without a trace. In the Walsh case the boy was later found murdered. Patz has never been seen or heard from since. His parents still live in the same apartment, still have the same phone number, on the off chance that he might find his way home. In the intervening years, two men have been named as murder suspects, though no remains have been uncovered.

                          When Patz disappeared I was just a kid, but almost overnight the whole mood of the community changed. Suffice to say, it hasn't changed back. People of my generation are genuinely afraid for their kids, rightly or wrongly, and thus even I'm guilty of a bit of over-parenting. I can't say that this fear is totally reasonable, because to be honest the odds of a child being abducted and killed by a stranger are infinitesimal, but it is real, and it has resulted in a lot of over-parenting over the years.
                          I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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                          • #28
                            In any case, wasn't the 50-70's more known from suicide cults and postal men going postal? Office shootings seemed to be all the rage back then.
                            Originally posted by slick_miester View Post

                            Just want to pick on this for a moment. Back in 1979, the US suffered two high-profile child disappearances: Adam Walsh and Eton Patz. They were really frightening cases, because in both instances the children simply disappeared without a trace. In the Walsh case the boy was later found murdered. Patz has never been seen or heard from since. His parents still live in the same apartment, still have the same phone number, on the off chance that he might find his way home. In the intervening years, two men have been named as murder suspects, though no remains have been uncovered.

                            When Patz disappeared I was just a kid, but almost overnight the whole mood of the community changed. Suffice to say, it hasn't changed back. People of my generation are genuinely afraid for their kids, rightly or wrongly, and thus even I'm guilty of a bit of over-parenting. I can't say that this fear is totally reasonable, because to be honest the odds of a child being abducted and killed by a stranger are infinitesimal, but it is real, and it has resulted in a lot of over-parenting over the years.
                            Can't say I haven't noticed, as this fear of "a stranger" features in all American culture as well. Probably has something to do with the gun culture as well, with everyone being afraid of some stranger breaking into their house to kill and rob.

                            But, it happens everywhere though. There's a few famous cases in Finland as well.

                            Some kind of horror upon realizing that life isn't perfect and never being able to fce that horror?
                            Wisdom is personal

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Karri View Post
                              In any case, wasn't the 50-70's more known from suicide cults and postal men going postal? Office shootings seemed to be all the rage back then.
                              Crazy cults started in the late 1960s: no doubt the residue of the prevailing sentiment that held that "consciousness could be found for 50¢ a tab."

                              The postal thing started in the 1980s, as did the office shootings. Ironically enough, a former client of mine suffered an office shooting just a few years ago. Suffice to say, he's no longer my client.
                              I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Karri View Post
                                Can't say I haven't noticed, as this fear of "a stranger" features in all American culture as well. Probably has something to do with the gun culture as well, with everyone being afraid of some stranger breaking into their house to kill and rob.

                                But, it happens everywhere though. There's a few famous cases in Finland as well.

                                Some kind of horror upon realizing that life isn't perfect and never being able to fce that horror?
                                One of the salient features of US culture -- one that seems to inspire just a touch of envy from foreigners -- is our mobility. In a feudal or semi-feudal society, a common man just can't pick up and move: there are far too many restrictions. Add to that an genuine lack of free and available land, and Europeans for centuries were essentially rooted to the very spots on which they were born. Mobility to a European for a long time meant boarding a ship for the New World.

                                Here mobility is taken for granted. We have the wide open frontier. The fur trapper. The wagon train. The homesteader. The 49'er. Then came the automobile, and the eight-lane interstate super highway. I can easily cover 4,800km in little over a calendar day. The flip side is that our highways and biways are chocked full of all kinds of weirdos, including some very dangerous characters. One enterprising crime reporter, from Norway if memory serves, posited that Jack the Ripper left Britain for the US, and left his particular calling cards from NY to CA and various spots in between, so mobile was he when he arrived on these shores. To be frank, all kinds of unpleasant characters tumble into town off the road, so it's only natural that Americans might be apprehensive about strangers: our reality has proven it at least somewhat reasonable.

                                But if it's genuine fear and loathing of strangers you want: my great-grandmother told me of how when a stranger came to her village in Poltava province, he was straightaway accused of being a vampire, and was forced to prove his innocence by trial -- which consisted of nailing a mask to his face through his eye sockets. Had he survived, he would have been proven to have been a vampire -- but alas, he expired, thus he was known to have been but a mere mortal.
                                I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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