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The Baby Boom Generation (50s-60s-70s) and School Shootings

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  • The Baby Boom Generation (50s-60s-70s) and School Shootings

    I grew up during that period and never heard of a school shooting. There may have been one, but it never came to my knowledge.

    Check me if I'm wrong:

    1. School age children during that period were a larger percentage of the population than now. (The section of town where I grew up had five or six elementary schools. Now it has one.)

    2. Guns were just as dangerous and easier to get (fewer gun laws).

    3. Afaik no child took prescription drugs for some mood-swing or emotional problem (depression, etc).
    {}

    "Any story sounds true until someone tells the other side and sets the record straight." -Proverbs 18:17

  • #2
    Keep in mind AR-15 style weapons were not available while you were growing up.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by BorderRuffian View Post
      I grew up during that period and never heard of a school shooting. There may have been one, but it never came to my knowledge.

      Check me if I'm wrong:

      1. School age children during that period were a larger percentage of the population than now. (The section of town where I grew up had five or six elementary schools. Now it has one.)

      2. Guns were just as dangerous and easier to get (fewer gun laws).

      3. Afaik no child took prescription drugs for some mood-swing or emotional problem (depression, etc).
      I do not have an answer, but I will point that in those days there was a lower percentage of the children population which attended school ( compare for example rates of high school graduates then and now). There were also way less opportunities for children with psychological problems to continue their education. There were not any strict mandates for special education. This does not mean that I dismiss your observation about the modern overprescription of drugs and medical diagnosis of supposedly problematic teenagers. I am just saying that the factors I mentioned must be also considered.
      My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by III Corps View Post
        Keep in mind AR-15 style weapons were not available while you were growing up.
        Well, one could still use the weapons of that era and attempt to murder his classmates. It is possible that our society has certain cultural characteristics that may contribute to this mass shooting phenomenon. Too much exposure to violence? Perhaps... On the other hand, one can argue about other cultural characteristics.
        My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by pamak View Post
          Well, one could still use the weapons of that era and attempt to murder his classmates. It is possible that our society has certain cultural characteristics that may contribute to this mass shooting phenomenon. Too much exposure to violence? Perhaps... On the other hand, one can argue about other cultural characteristics.
          Al Gore's wife Tipper blamed Ozzy Osbourne. Her remedy was to place stickers on records.





          While AR-15s were not available before the 1960s, Thompson sub-machine guns did exist. When they were first introduced to the market, they were quite expensive ($200 in 1920s money, or ~$2,800 today.) The 1934 Gun Control Act placed another $200 tax on the purchases of automatic weapons.

          Come to think of it, motorized interstate bank robbery a la Bonnie & Clyde and John Dillinger, bootlegging, syndicated transnational organized crime, and kidnapping were unheard of before the 1920s and '30s, too. I'm guessing that the combination of new technologies and evolving social mores and popular trends converged to engender new classes of crime. Maybe we're seeing something similar today.
          I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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          • #6
            Originally posted by III Corps View Post
            Keep in mind AR-15 style weapons were not available while you were growing up.
            So?
            The First Amendment applies to SMS, Emails, Blogs, online news, the Fourth applies to your cell phone, computer, and your car, but the Second only applies to muskets?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by III Corps View Post
              Keep in mind AR-15 style weapons were not available while you were growing up.
              --------------
              Are you kidding? They didn't fully ban autos till what 89? We had all kinds of guns back in the 60's,70's and 80's. This sh it didn't happen back then cause our parents and school teachers would have beat the sh it out of us. Hell even my parents friends had permission to kick my azz if I got out of line and sometimes did. My dad had guns he kept in the closet. I didn't go near them. That would have been instant azz thumpin. When we got in fights as kids if you won, you won if you lost, you swallowed your pride and accepted it.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mystikeye View Post
                --------------
                Are you kidding? They didn't fully ban autos till what 89? We had all kinds of guns back in the 60's,70's and 80's. This sh it didn't happen back then cause our parents and school teachers would have beat the sh it out of us. Hell even my parents friends had permission to kick my azz if I got out of line and sometimes did. My dad had guns he kept in the closet. I didn't go near them. That would have been instant azz thumpin. When we got in fights as kids if you won, you won if you lost, you swallowed your pride and accepted it.
                The idea that "beating" is the factor that mostly contribute to the modern mass murders does not make much sense. I can say the same thing about another argument I read in another thread (from Nichols, I think) which tried to attribute the modern mass murders to the lack of religious faith in modern societies. If such cases were really important factors then we would have seen a much bigger effect in other western societies where teacher also do not beat their students and where the lack of religious faith is even more wide-spread compared to the US (which has a quite big percentage of religious population) .
                My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by pamak View Post
                  The idea that "beating" is the factor that mostly contribute to the modern mass murders does not make much sense. I can say the same thing about another argument I read in another thread (from Nichols, I think) which tried to attribute the modern mass murders to the lack of religious faith in modern societies. If such cases were really important factors then we would have seen a much bigger effect in other western societies where teacher also do not beat their students and where the lack of religious faith is even more wide-spread compared to the US (which has a quite big percentage of religious population) .
                  Good points.

                  Violent crime in the USA has fallen considerably over the last 25 years but it is still higher than most other developed countries.
                  The one thing that is common just about everywhere is the correlation between crime and income equality.
                  I'm not suggesting socialism is the solution but the link is there.
                  As for the specifics of school shootings; I don't know but I'm sure there is some interesting reading out there on the topic.
                  "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their
                  validity." - Abraham Lincoln.
                  "Nothing's going to change while one side it lying about the cause and the other is lying about the solution" - Me

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by E.D. Morel View Post
                    Violent crime in the USA has fallen considerably over the last 25 years
                    I happen to subscribe to the Donohue–Levitt hypothesis that states that legalized abortion is largely responsible for the nation-wide reduction in crime that the US has experienced since the mid-1990s, but suffice to say, that theory is not without its critics.

                    Originally posted by E.D. Morel View Post
                    but it is still higher than most other developed countries.
                    Are you suggesting that our Irish are more criminally-inclined than your Irish?

                    Originally posted by E.D. Morel View Post
                    The one thing that is common just about everywhere is the correlation between crime and income equality.
                    Crime in general perhaps, but these seemingly motiveless killing sprees appear to be the almost exclusive domain of middle-class young suburban white males. They're not poor, and they're not uneducated. From a strictly economic/demographic point of view, these spree killers should be those least likely to commit violent crime.

                    Originally posted by E.D. Morel View Post
                    I'm not suggesting socialism is the solution but the link is there.
                    If we accept as axiomatic that socialism is the proposition that every living human is entitled to not only freedom but to satisfaction of his desires, then we have to accept that the socialist zeitgeist does indeed play a role in this motiveless murder phenomenon. Dr Joel Norris, former chief forensic psychologist for the Georgia State dept of Corrections posited that Rene Descartes' "I think therefore I am" has, since the end of WW2, morphed into "I desire, therefore I'm entitled." Face it: we live in a society where every petty whim is afforded some level of respect, be it the walking of dogs in supermarkets to smoking marijuana to all kinds of heretofore strange sexual practices, they're all now acceptable.



                    Yeah, The Simpsons made light of it, but in reality, we're not Free to be You and Me. We all have duties and responsibilities, to ourselves, to our families, and to our societies. Yet of all the old fashioned "square" values, it's responsibility that's been most roundly rejected. That being the case, we can't at all be surprised when some one occasionally gives in to his darker impulses. He is, after all, being free to be himself.

                    Originally posted by E.D. Morel View Post
                    As for the specifics of school shootings; I don't know but I'm sure there is some interesting reading out there on the topic.
                    I googled "easy life leads to spree killing," and I came upon this article. I've not read it fully yet, but so far it looks interesting.
                    I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by pamak View Post
                      I can say the same thing about another argument I read in another thread (from Nichols, I think) which tried to attribute the modern mass murders to the lack of religious faith in modern societies.
                      Why do you feel the need to deliberately misrepresent what others post?

                      I gave my opinion on multiple things that may have contributed:

                      Originally posted by Nichols View Post
                      Right now the current laws are not enforced, I don't think additional laws that may or may not be enforced will have an effect.

                      IMO, the larger problem is with society itself. The abortion on demand mentality lowers the value of life. Violent movies & video games lower the value of life. Broken families lower the value of life. Taking God out of the picture lowers the value of life.

                      I realize many wont agree with the above but the above 'behaviors' if you will were not openly present 30-40 years ago when kids took guns to school.

                      Everyone over a certain age that can legally own a gun are currently permitted. If current laws were enforced, less people would own guns. I do think that everyone should have training before they can purchase a gun.

                      Back in the day, the parent taught gun safety and marksmanship to the sons & daughters.

                      There is a real solution and it all has to do with individual responsibility from all aspects of society.
                      Let's see if you'll be responsible enough to owe up that you twisted what I said....
                      "I don't discuss sitting presidents," Mattis tells NPR in an interview. "I believe that you owe a period of quiet."

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by III Corps View Post
                        Keep in mind AR-15 style weapons were not available while you were growing up.
                        They were available in 1963:

                        So, as the Pentagon and the Army dithered, Colt went in a different direction and pitched the guns to private shooters. In 1963, advertisements started popping up in magazines such as Guns.

                        Something for you to keep in mind:

                        But Colt's decision was not entirely surprising. While the technology behind the AR-15 was a far cry from Revolutionary War muskets or Civil War rifles, the idea of owning a "military-style" firearm was hardly odd, even after World War II.

                        Historically, private citizens had owned guns similar or identical to military types, simply because that was what was available. War was often the driving factor behind innovative firearms designs, anyway.

                        https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/a...-than-50-years
                        "I don't discuss sitting presidents," Mattis tells NPR in an interview. "I believe that you owe a period of quiet."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by pamak View Post
                          The idea that "beating" is the factor that mostly contribute to the modern mass murders does not make much sense. I can say the same thing about another argument I read in another thread (from Nichols, I think) which tried to attribute the modern mass murders to the lack of religious faith in modern societies. If such cases were really important factors then we would have seen a much bigger effect in other western societies where teacher also do not beat their students and where the lack of religious faith is even more wide-spread compared to the US (which has a quite big percentage of religious population) .
                          --------------
                          Beating isn't the point, its discipline that is the point. Discipline teaches respect if not fear of consequences of unacceptable behavior. That is the problem with todays society is there is no parenting and the schools are too petrified of law suits to discipline a child. It aint perfect but its better than anything else I've seen lately.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Nichols View Post
                            . . . . Something for you to keep in mind:

                            But Colt's decision was not entirely surprising. While the technology behind the AR-15 was a far cry from Revolutionary War muskets or Civil War rifles, the idea of owning a "military-style" firearm was hardly odd, even after World War II.

                            Historically, private citizens had owned guns similar or identical to military types, simply because that was what was available. War was often the driving factor behind innovative firearms designs, anyway.

                            https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/a...-than-50-years
                            Familiarity. I'm sure that WW1 vets plucked up all the surplus Springfield '03s, just as WW2 vets absorbed the surplus M1 Garands. For any one whose been in the service in the last fifty years, the AR platform is very familiar. We're all comfortable with it, warts and all. I don't think that I'd be so comfortable with an AK-type weapon.
                            I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by III Corps View Post
                              Keep in mind AR-15 style weapons were not available while you were growing up.
                              Oh, I get it! The visual appearance of the gun is causing school violence.... Riiiggghhhtt...

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