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Pay by the Mile, Not by the Gallon

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  • Half Pint John
    replied
    Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
    Include bicyclists in that tax farm. They use the roads as well...

    Leave a comment:


  • Pruitt
    replied
    I have had an EZ Tag for several years. About a year ago I changed my registration and car License Plate to Texas and it seems to have broken down the system. These people would automatically debit my bank account when the balance got under a certain amount. I was hardly using the EZ Tag at all any more and I got a message at my PO Box in Louisiana that I had to contact them. For once I was able to get someone to pick up the phone and I gave them my new information. I was doing fine until he asked for my new License Plate number and I did not have it to hand. That is pretty much where the call ended and I am still not in their system correctly. It seems the automatic gates take a picture of the car's license plate and compares it to the plate on file!

    It has been easier ever since to avoid the toll roads...

    Pruitt

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    "Paying by the mile" means getting screwed multiple times on each and every trip:

    1. the high price of gas to begin with.
    2. the high fuel taxes levied by state and Federal which have not been used to fix the roads in the first place.
    3. "pay by the mile".

    We live in a spread out society. Wait until a city dweller finds out how far his fruits and veggies have to be trucked in to a place like NYC and how much he will have to pay to offset the trucking cost.

    The solution is lighter trucks and BETTER ROADS, especially better roads. Semis carry 80,000 pounds of cargo per trip, and the roads can't handle it.

    Leave a comment:


  • slick_miester
    replied
    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
    It makes perfect sense to politicians and bureaucrats. It gives them more control, more budget, more people they're "managing," and they can claim it's for "The people" and that they're helping "The poor."
    Well, there's that aspect, but from a more "Occam's Razor" point of view, the likeliest explanation is that the powers-that-be need a new pretext for doling out pork to their friend$. Granting contracts for new toll plazas and "EZ Pass" detectors and computerized billing systems can rake in millions and millions, for those who are in the know.

    When viewed like that, taxing gasoline at the wholesale level is probably the most effective and efficient means of collecting revenue for highways. Then do the same on electric meters: a surcharge to cover electric cars. And public charging stations should be like coin-operated air pumps, too. Keeps the taxes exactly where they belong: on the users.

    Leave a comment:


  • T. A. Gardner
    replied
    Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
    A situation too common in many states; the use of transportation funds to finance "public transit" boondoggles.
    Throwing good money into bad systems/"solutions" would seem to be the first priority for correction.
    It makes perfect sense to politicians and bureaucrats. It gives them more control, more budget, more people they're "managing," and they can claim it's for "The people" and that they're helping "The poor."

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
    Arizona has pretty good roads on the whole. The areas I've noted the most problems with streets are in cities that tend to be Progressive as they spend all their transportation money on public transit nobody uses, bike lanes and paths, light fair... err.. rail... and pedestrian crosswalk lights.

    Tucson, the "Berkeley" of Arizona has terrible surface streets. They're also clogged with unsynchronized traffic lights, and all have bike lanes that take up otherwise useful space for cars. They have these pedestrian crosswalk light systems that bring traffic to a standstill, and a light fail system (aka Trolley) that goes from nowhere to nothing but cost hundreds of millions to install. Basically, Tucson is anti-car but there's no substitute for using a car to get around so the politicians doing what they're doing are pushing their insanity on the public rather than doing what works.

    The interstate system here is in good shape and is even expanding some on the state level.
    A situation too common in many states; the use of transportation funds to finance "public transit" boondoggles.
    Throwing good money into bad systems/"solutions" would seem to be the first priority for correction.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gixxer86g
    replied
    Originally posted by TactiKill J. View Post
    Lol. You think there are sidewalks everywhere? I see people walking on the ROAD everyday.
    And they should get the **** out of the way.....

    Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • T. A. Gardner
    replied
    Originally posted by SRV Ron View Post
    When the interstate highway system was built, those roads were built to last. Now, after 60 years, the first ones are worn out but the new roads are now falling apart in less then 10 years.

    What went wrong?
    Arizona has pretty good roads on the whole. The areas I've noted the most problems with streets are in cities that tend to be Progressive as they spend all their transportation money on public transit nobody uses, bike lanes and paths, light fair... err.. rail... and pedestrian crosswalk lights.

    Tucson, the "Berkeley" of Arizona has terrible surface streets. They're also clogged with unsynchronized traffic lights, and all have bike lanes that take up otherwise useful space for cars. They have these pedestrian crosswalk light systems that bring traffic to a standstill, and a light fail system (aka Trolley) that goes from nowhere to nothing but cost hundreds of millions to install. Basically, Tucson is anti-car but there's no substitute for using a car to get around so the politicians doing what they're doing are pushing their insanity on the public rather than doing what works.

    The interstate system here is in good shape and is even expanding some on the state level.

    Leave a comment:


  • SRV Ron
    replied
    When the interstate highway system was built, those roads were built to last. Now, after 60 years, the first ones are worn out but the new roads are now falling apart in less then 10 years.

    What went wrong?

    Leave a comment:


  • SRV Ron
    replied
    Originally posted by Gixxer86g View Post
    Sorry Ron, but pedestrians don't share THE ROAD.

    And we dont drive on sidewalks.

    Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk
    Don't you ever walk? If you do, don't you use the sidewalk if available, or do you just walk through other people's property instead of along the side of the road?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    First, we need a full accounting of where all of the road taxes and designated funds have actually been spent.

    Colorado has recently declared a mini-crisis, revealing that virtually nothing has actually been spent on roads; however, they haven't been able to say why or where the appropriated monies actually went.

    Next, there needs to be serious research on creating better lasting roads to begin with. Today's roads can't withstand the usage of the heavily laden trucks using them.

    Throwing more money at the problem isn't the solution.

    Leave a comment:


  • TactiKill J.
    replied
    Lol. You think there are sidewalks everywhere? I see people walking on the ROAD everyday.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gixxer86g
    replied
    Originally posted by SRV Ron View Post
    So, when do we start taxing the feet? After all, one has to use the sidewalks or the side of the road.
    Sorry Ron, but pedestrians don't share THE ROAD.

    And we dont drive on sidewalks.

    Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • SRV Ron
    replied
    Originally posted by Gixxer86g View Post
    Agreed.......

    Actually, they should be forced to register and insure regardless of the OP.

    Equal rights on the road is a........two way street.

    Pay up, or get the hell out of the way.

    Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk
    So, when do we start taxing the feet? After all, one has to use the sidewalks or the side of the road.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gixxer86g
    replied
    Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
    Include bicyclists in that tax farm. They use the roads as well...
    Agreed.......

    Actually, they should be forced to register and insure regardless of the OP.

    Equal rights on the road is a........two way street.

    Pay up, or get the hell out of the way.

    Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:

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