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  • "The Trump economy is blasting off."

    Davos, Switzerland ó Itís not Comey. Or Mueller. Or the Russians. Or Stormy Daniels.

    Itís the economy, stupid.

    And right now, the Trump economy is blasting off.

    Davos Man likes.

    In conversations with business and political leaders gathered at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, there is almost zero mention of the controversies which consume coverage of Trump in America.

    Instead, people talk about the real possibility now that growth in the U.S. economy could hit 4 percent this year...

    [...]

    [T]here are analysts who say the worldís economies are simply being boosted by all the easy money central banks pumped into them for years ó and thatís a bubble that will burst.

    But business types here disagree. And they give a lot of credit to Trump for the renewed strength and vigor they sense in the sinews of the global economy.

    Deregulation is the first thing they mention. The cost of doing business has come down fast. That means margins will go up. Thatís why so many investors see American companies as such good bets.

    And thatís all Trump.

    The tax cut is alsoóno surpriseóhugely popular here.

    [...]
    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/analy...ry?id=52632659

    Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

  • #2
    Damn. That's ABC saying it.
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

    Comment


    • #3
      It might be fizzling and sputtering, but out here in the real world countryside of Colorado, nothing is "blasting off". The same retail spaces, and more, are empty and for rent. The prices everywhere continue to rise while incomes lag far behind.

      People continue to struggle to make ends meet, and continue to hurt while making the effort.

      I've said it before, and I will keep saying it until it registers: The government, the shyster media and the pollsters DO NOT decide what is doing well - the people decide when things are going well...specifically the blue collar working people who keep this nation going while the parasites dance in the streets.

      If you want to deceive yourself, have at it...but STOP trying to bulls**t me.
      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

      Comment


      • #4
        It's been picking up in Phoenix. Empty retail space is declining slowly. It will probably take years to recover from the Obama malaise of quasi-socialism though.

        Comment


        • #5
          Stores continuing to close here in Colorado, including some of the big Box stores, and lots of the smaller businesses. Also, I look at what replaces them. a tattoo parlor taking the place of a reputable business, is a net loss, not a gain.

          There are many businesses in Canon City that have been empty continuously since I was working for DOC, and that's clear back to '90, we're not seeing this "explosion" of economic welfare anywhere in our area. In fact, the largest business down here -besides DOC - the Estes rocket factory (yeah, I know, but internationally known to all hobbyists and enthusiasts) just went bankrupt and laid off everyone. The local newspaper went under a couple of years ago; ironically, it's old headquarters in town has been vacant for decades and now the new plant is also vacant for the last several years.
          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
            It might be fizzling and sputtering, but out here in the real world countryside of Colorado, nothing is "blasting off". The same retail spaces, and more, are empty and for rent. The prices everywhere continue to rise while incomes lag far behind.

            People continue to struggle to make ends meet, and continue to hurt while making the effort.

            I've said it before, and I will keep saying it until it registers: The government, the shyster media and the pollsters DO NOT decide what is doing well - the people decide when things are going well...specifically the blue collar working people who keep this nation going while the parasites dance in the streets.

            If you want to deceive yourself, have at it...but STOP trying to bulls**t me.
            So what music do you think the Doctor dance to?
            "Ask not what your country can do for you"

            Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

            youíre entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
              So what music do you think the Doctor dance to?
              The theme from The Wizard of Oz - "Somewhere, Over the Rainbow"...
              Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
                So what music do you think the Doctor dance to?

                This kind of "music"...
                Regulatory Relief: The Untold Story of 2017

                DEC 18, 2017 - 9:00AM
                THOMAS J. DONOHUE
                President and CEO, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

                After coming into office on the heels of a relentless regulatory onslaught from the Obama administration, President Trump and leaders in Congress worked diligently throughout 2017 to rein in the regulatory state. These actions didnít always make big headlines, but their results certainly have. Soaring business confidence, a robust stock rally, and consecutive quarters with growth rates of 3% tell the story of an economy finally feeling relief from overregulation.

                President Trump started quickly upon entering office, promptly halting all pending regulations and signing executive orders to ensure that new rules were issued only if old ones were eliminated. Congress also took bold action early to seize a narrow window of opportunity to invalidate regulations using the Congressional Review Act (CRA).

                Under the CRA, Congress reversed 14 midnight regulations issued in the waning days of the Obama administration. One example was the Federal Contracts Blacklisting Rule, a devastating regulation that could have barred businesses from federal contracts for mere allegations of labor violations. Congress more recently used the CRA process to rescind the anti-arbitration rule, which would have effectively banned arbitration clauses in consumer contracts and forced all disputes to be dealt with in court. It would have amounted to an enormous gift to the trial bar.

                The Environmental Protection Agency was another bright spot for rule reversals. It took action to repeal harmful regulations like the sweeping Waters of the U.S. rule, which broadly expanded the definition of federally regulated bodies of water, and the Clean Power Plan (CPP), which sought to regulate large swaths of the economy.

                Harmful labor regulations were also rescinded...


                U.S. Chamber of Commerce



                The Trump Administrationís Historic Year in Deregulation
                DEC 18, 2017 - 12:30PM
                JOE JOHNSON
                Executive Director, Federal Regulatory Process Review and Analysis

                One of President Donald Trumpís first actions after entering the White House was beginning the process of rolling back the regulatory onslaught of his predecessor. As 2017 comes to a close, he should be pleased with the good start.

                [...]

                Each year OIRA reviews ďsignificant regulationsĒ as defined by Executive Order 12,866 totaling on average a few hundred per year. Of those, a substantially smaller number of regulations are economically significant, meaning they carry costs greater than $100 million per year. OIRA catalogs these most costly rules each year in an annual report to Congress, in which it reports the estimated costs and benefits of the rules.

                Since 2009, that has meant about 14 new major regulations each year, with estimated costs totaling about $12 billion annually. In comparison, in fiscal year 2017, there were only three new regulations put on the books while 67 deregulatory actions were completed, and the total annualized cost of new regulations was negative $570.4 million.

                Thus, instead of adding 14 big new rules and adding another $12 billion to the cumulative burden of regulations, this year the federal government, on net, reduced the number of new rules and reduced the cumulative burden of regulations. This is the first time since OIRA began reporting that the number of new rules has been so small and that the annualized change in the regulatory burden has been negative.

                U.S. Chamber of Commerce

                Not bad for the first year of a President with no political experience, a hostile media and an ongoing coup d'ťtat being conducted by Obama holdovers in the DOJ, FBI and IC.
                Trumpís top 10 accomplishments of 2017
                BY BRANDON CONRADIS - 12/25/17

                President Trumpís first year in office had its stumbles, but it also had a number of successes that had the White House and congressional Republicans crowing at the end of the year.

                While Trump has seen his approval ratings fall, heís also gone a long way toward meeting a number of his campaign promises, including a pledge to reduce taxes.

                The tax-cut bill approved by Congress days before Christmas was sweeping in scope and a major victory for a White House that hopes to build on it in Trumpís second year in office.

                Hereís a look at Trumpís biggest accomplishments of the year.

                1. The tax-cut bill

                [...]

                Itís the biggest tax legislation to be approved by Congress since 1986, and would be significant if thatís all it did.

                The fact that it also eliminated ObamaCareís mandate that individuals buy insurance and opens the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to drilling ó something several GOP administrations had tried but failed to do ó makes it truly historic.

                2. Neil Gorsuchís confirmation to the Supreme Court

                Trumpís biggest early victory came when the Senate, in April, confirmed Neil Gorsuch to succeed the late Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court.

                [...]

                3. Roll-back of regulations

                Trump signed an executive order cutting regulations for small businesses and moved forward with plans to repeal the Clean Power Plan, one of Obamaís signature acts as president. Trump has also overseen moves to expand oil drilling in the Arctic and Gulf of Mexico and granted a permit to the Keystone XL pipeline previously rejected by Obama.

                [...]

                4. The travel ban

                [...]

                5. Declaring Jerusalem the capital of Israel

                [...]

                6. Withdrawal from Paris climate deal

                [...]

                7. Pulling out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership

                [...]

                8. Roll-back of some of Obamaís Cuba policies

                [...]

                9. Moving to repeal Obamaís net neutrality rules

                In another blow to regulations enacted under Obama, the Federal Communications Commission voted to repeal its landmark net neutrality rules this month. The move drew ire from Democrats, consumer groups and tech companies, but was seen as a major win for advocates of less government oversight.

                10. Fighting ó and further degrading ó ISIS

                [...]

                The Hill
                Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
                  This kind of "music"...
                  Regulatory Relief: The Untold Story of 2017

                  DEC 18, 2017 - 9:00AM
                  THOMAS J. DONOHUE
                  President and CEO, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

                  After coming into office on the heels of a relentless regulatory onslaught from the Obama administration, President Trump and leaders in Congress worked diligently throughout 2017 to rein in the regulatory state. These actions didnít always make big headlines, but their results certainly have. Soaring business confidence, a robust stock rally, and consecutive quarters with growth rates of 3% tell the story of an economy finally feeling relief from overregulation.

                  President Trump started quickly upon entering office, promptly halting all pending regulations and signing executive orders to ensure that new rules were issued only if old ones were eliminated. Congress also took bold action early to seize a narrow window of opportunity to invalidate regulations using the Congressional Review Act (CRA).

                  Under the CRA, Congress reversed 14 midnight regulations issued in the waning days of the Obama administration. One example was the Federal Contracts Blacklisting Rule, a devastating regulation that could have barred businesses from federal contracts for mere allegations of labor violations. Congress more recently used the CRA process to rescind the anti-arbitration rule, which would have effectively banned arbitration clauses in consumer contracts and forced all disputes to be dealt with in court. It would have amounted to an enormous gift to the trial bar.

                  The Environmental Protection Agency was another bright spot for rule reversals. It took action to repeal harmful regulations like the sweeping Waters of the U.S. rule, which broadly expanded the definition of federally regulated bodies of water, and the Clean Power Plan (CPP), which sought to regulate large swaths of the economy.

                  Harmful labor regulations were also rescinded...


                  U.S. Chamber of Commerce



                  The Trump Administrationís Historic Year in Deregulation
                  DEC 18, 2017 - 12:30PM
                  JOE JOHNSON
                  Executive Director, Federal Regulatory Process Review and Analysis

                  One of President Donald Trumpís first actions after entering the White House was beginning the process of rolling back the regulatory onslaught of his predecessor. As 2017 comes to a close, he should be pleased with the good start.

                  [...]

                  Each year OIRA reviews ďsignificant regulationsĒ as defined by Executive Order 12,866 totaling on average a few hundred per year. Of those, a substantially smaller number of regulations are economically significant, meaning they carry costs greater than $100 million per year. OIRA catalogs these most costly rules each year in an annual report to Congress, in which it reports the estimated costs and benefits of the rules.

                  Since 2009, that has meant about 14 new major regulations each year, with estimated costs totaling about $12 billion annually. In comparison, in fiscal year 2017, there were only three new regulations put on the books while 67 deregulatory actions were completed, and the total annualized cost of new regulations was negative $570.4 million.

                  Thus, instead of adding 14 big new rules and adding another $12 billion to the cumulative burden of regulations, this year the federal government, on net, reduced the number of new rules and reduced the cumulative burden of regulations. This is the first time since OIRA began reporting that the number of new rules has been so small and that the annualized change in the regulatory burden has been negative.

                  U.S. Chamber of Commerce

                  Not bad for the first year of a President with no political experience, a hostile media and an ongoing coup d'ťtat being conducted by Obama holdovers in the DOJ, FBI and IC.
                  Trumpís top 10 accomplishments of 2017
                  BY BRANDON CONRADIS - 12/25/17

                  President Trumpís first year in office had its stumbles, but it also had a number of successes that had the White House and congressional Republicans crowing at the end of the year.

                  While Trump has seen his approval ratings fall, heís also gone a long way toward meeting a number of his campaign promises, including a pledge to reduce taxes.

                  The tax-cut bill approved by Congress days before Christmas was sweeping in scope and a major victory for a White House that hopes to build on it in Trumpís second year in office.

                  Hereís a look at Trumpís biggest accomplishments of the year.

                  1. The tax-cut bill

                  [...]

                  Itís the biggest tax legislation to be approved by Congress since 1986, and would be significant if thatís all it did.

                  The fact that it also eliminated ObamaCareís mandate that individuals buy insurance and opens the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to drilling ó something several GOP administrations had tried but failed to do ó makes it truly historic.

                  2. Neil Gorsuchís confirmation to the Supreme Court

                  Trumpís biggest early victory came when the Senate, in April, confirmed Neil Gorsuch to succeed the late Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court.

                  [...]

                  3. Roll-back of regulations

                  Trump signed an executive order cutting regulations for small businesses and moved forward with plans to repeal the Clean Power Plan, one of Obamaís signature acts as president. Trump has also overseen moves to expand oil drilling in the Arctic and Gulf of Mexico and granted a permit to the Keystone XL pipeline previously rejected by Obama.

                  [...]

                  4. The travel ban

                  [...]

                  5. Declaring Jerusalem the capital of Israel

                  [...]

                  6. Withdrawal from Paris climate deal

                  [...]

                  7. Pulling out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership

                  [...]

                  8. Roll-back of some of Obamaís Cuba policies

                  [...]

                  9. Moving to repeal Obamaís net neutrality rules

                  In another blow to regulations enacted under Obama, the Federal Communications Commission voted to repeal its landmark net neutrality rules this month. The move drew ire from Democrats, consumer groups and tech companies, but was seen as a major win for advocates of less government oversight.

                  10. Fighting ó and further degrading ó ISIS

                  [...]

                  The Hill
                  In other words, more charts and graphs...largely unrelated to the real world around us.
                  Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                    In other words, more charts and graphs...largely unrelated to the real world around us.
                    His World MM, you should be use to it.
                    "Ask not what your country can do for you"

                    Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

                    youíre entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                      Stores continuing to close here in Colorado, including some of the big Box stores, and lots of the smaller businesses. Also, I look at what replaces them. a tattoo parlor taking the place of a reputable business, is a net loss, not a gain.

                      There are many businesses in Canon City that have been empty continuously since I was working for DOC, and that's clear back to '90, we're not seeing this "explosion" of economic welfare anywhere in our area. In fact, the largest business down here -besides DOC - the Estes rocket factory (yeah, I know, but internationally known to all hobbyists and enthusiasts) just went bankrupt and laid off everyone. The local newspaper went under a couple of years ago; ironically, it's old headquarters in town has been vacant for decades and now the new plant is also vacant for the last several years.
                      Rural areas are always the last to feel economic relief, and benefit the least. I would love to move the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, but there are no jobs there and long have not. That is just how it is. Here in SE Michigan where the auto industries boom/bust cycle impacts the most we are finally feeling the effects of the boom. At the height of the credit crisis something like one in six homes were in foreclosure. Now few homes are up for sale, and this past year has seen a spurt in new housing construction. Property values are also well up.

                      Are the problems in Colorado an indication of a "Fake Boom," or are they more self inflicted? How is Wyoming, Nebraska, and Texas doing by comparison?

                      Tuebor

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        There will be negative consequences to deregulation, hopefully the Trump team will be out in front of them.
                        We hunt the hunters

                        Comment

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