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Investigation: $10M LAPD Electric BMWs Appear Unused or Misused

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  • Investigation: $10M LAPD Electric BMWs Appear Unused or Misused

    File this under “Well, what did you expect?”


    Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
    Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

  • #2
    Well, what do you expect? They don't have the range or power to be used as actual patrol cars. Instead, they are just for running errands and other idiocy. The Greentards are winning in California.

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    • #3
      Only thing I'd want to do to an 'electric' patrol car is chip it out and see how much acceleration I could get before the battery died.
      Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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      • #4
        This does save money. Better to spend $10m and stick the useless cars in a garage then waste $100m on a real pilot program that would fail.

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        • #5

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          • #6
            The average American is too fat to fit in the back seat of one of those cars.
            Which will greatly reduce arrest, therefore the crime rate will be reduced if we buy electric cop cars!

            Don’t you right wing nuts and climate change deniers understand the progressive way to solve two crisis at once with 10 million dollars?


            Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
            Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
              The average American is too fat to fit in the back seat of one of those cars.
              Which will greatly reduce arrest, therefore the crime rate will be reduced if we buy electric cop cars!

              Don’t you right wing nuts and climate change deniers understand the progressive way to solve two crisis at once with 10 million dollars?


              It's not just fat people. When the Dodge Charger put out a police package, you could have a cage or prisoners, bit not both. Entry into the rear seat with the cage was between 12-14", pretty difficult for an adult with their arms cuffed behind their back.

              The constant Fedrel requirements to make cars light and smaller have really hampered LE. More and more agencies are using prisoner transport vans, which raises costs and gas consumption while reducing on-the-street police presence.
              Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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              • #8
                Maybe they're just concerned that they have nobody in their service department that can fix the things... After all, they are the pinnacle of modern Nazi engineering and more complex than trying to figure out what your wife is really talking about...

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                • #9
                  It's still $10 million that could and should have been spent on far more useful things that the city really needed. The mere idea of a Beemer police cruiser is ludicrous, even in LA.
                  Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                    It's not just fat people. When the Dodge Charger put out a police package, you could have a cage or prisoners, bit not both. Entry into the rear seat with the cage was between 12-14", pretty difficult for an adult with their arms cuffed behind their back.

                    The constant Fedrel requirements to make cars light and smaller have really hampered LE. More and more agencies are using prisoner transport vans, which raises costs and gas consumption while reducing on-the-street police presence.
                    I disagree. Use of a transport van frees the officer to continue his patrol, and since a van can collect from a number of sites, it is a far more efficient use of resources that requiring each cruiser to transport a prisoner back to the booking area on its own.
                    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                      It's not just fat people. When the Dodge Charger put out a police package, you could have a cage or prisoners, bit not both. Entry into the rear seat with the cage was between 12-14", pretty difficult for an adult with their arms cuffed behind their back.

                      The constant Fedrel requirements to make cars light and smaller have really hampered LE. More and more agencies are using prisoner transport vans, which raises costs and gas consumption while reducing on-the-street police presence.
                      Just looking at the BMW electric car, after all the required equipment is installed there will barely be enough room for a ticket book.
                      Then there’s the clam doors...
                      Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                      Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                        Maybe they're just concerned that they have nobody in their service department that can fix the things... After all, they are the pinnacle of modern Nazi engineering and more complex than trying to figure out what your wife is really talking about...
                        That is a vital consideration.

                        A fleet patrol vehicle will get an oil change, alignment, and tuneup every 20-25 days, brakes every 40-60; in a three-year career it will consume four sets of tires (due to wear, not counting road debris) 1 or 2 heavy-duty alternators, four sets of heavy-duty batteries, a transmission overhaul, numerous electrical problems, and a lot of generalized repair. In Texas the AC system will need several repairs.

                        And unless you buy door window covers, 1.5 rear door windows.

                        Counting labor maintenance of a fleet patrol vehicle will approach the actual cost of the vehicle.

                        If you operate the Dodge charger add in a cam shaft every 35,000 miles and four front end rebuilds.

                        Take-home vehicles are much more cost-effective, but not terribly common outside Sheriff's Departments.

                        One of my secondary duties was Fleet maintenance. At one time my agency had three different makes and models in service, and the headaches never ended.
                        Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                          That is a vital consideration.

                          A fleet patrol vehicle will get an oil change, alignment, and tuneup every 20-25 days, brakes every 40-60; in a three-year career it will consume four sets of tires (due to wear, not counting road debris) 1 or 2 heavy-duty alternators, four sets of heavy-duty batteries, a transmission overhaul, numerous electrical problems, and a lot of generalized repair. In Texas the AC system will need several repairs.

                          Yep. I'm a Patrol Deputy predominately, SWAT operator second. Oil Change is a monthly thing. I will say that Chargers eat batteries less than Vics did, ditto with Alternators. Also, being in an agency that winds up being one of the primary pursuit agencies, along with the horrible condition of roads out in the middle of BFE, you can bump up that tire consumption to 20k miles at best between sets. And Chargers positively eat brakes (they brake like no-one's business, but god the pads get chewed up quick compared to a Vic), so right at a set a year on those. In NC you'll need to overhaul the AC every other year, sometimes you can stretch it to 3 years if you're good about PM.

                          And unless you buy door window covers, 1.5 rear door windows.

                          Oh yeah.....drunks and domestics love to kick out windows. It's like they know you're going to stop the car, and they know that when they buck up they're going to tote that whoopin, but they just do it anyway.

                          Counting labor maintenance of a fleet patrol vehicle will approach the actual cost of the vehicle.

                          If you operate the Dodge charger add in a cam shaft every 35,000 miles and four front end rebuilds.

                          Take-home vehicles are much more cost-effective, but not terribly common outside Sheriff's Departments.

                          One of my secondary duties was Fleet maintenance. At one time my agency had three different makes and models in service, and the headaches never ended.
                          We have the same issues with now 4 models in service. The Explorers are really proving to not be popular. Our K9s have flatly refused to switch to them and plan to go back to Chargers when their Tahoes wear out.

                          Having take home vehicles really does help with the maintenance issues, as someone who's rough on the equipment winds up with bad equipment, so it's an incentive to keep your own car in good shape and not wear it out.

                          OTOH, you're dead on with those front end rebuilds on Chargers. I drive a 2014 right now. Had a front end rebuild and brakes. 3 pursuits and a couple of shootings later, just had a second front end rebuild. I blame Dodge, they should know that they need to seriously beef up the front end of a vehicle that's going to be toting the weight of a crash bar and being driven on the edge of what the car can do from time to time. And I can say that I've driven my Charger right to the absolute edge, one night when one of my guys had a pursuit, said he had 4 at gunpoint and the neighborhood was coming out on him, and then went dead silent. Smoked my brakes, my tires, and slid corners at over 130mph in what was the longest and shortest 5 miles of my life.

                          Sorry, but LAPD should have bought M5s if they wanted a BMW patrol car. My ideal patrol car would be a Charger designed to ride 1 inch higher, with a Suspension built for the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series. Oh and the Hellcat Engine, detuned about 100hp.....so you'd have an engine that isn't being overtaxed when you have to hammer the throttle.
                          Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
                            We have the same issues with now 4 models in service. The Explorers are really proving to not be popular. Our K9s have flatly refused to switch to them and plan to go back to Chargers when their Tahoes wear out.

                            Having take home vehicles really does help with the maintenance issues, as someone who's rough on the equipment winds up with bad equipment, so it's an incentive to keep your own car in good shape and not wear it out.

                            OTOH, you're dead on with those front end rebuilds on Chargers. I drive a 2014 right now. Had a front end rebuild and brakes. 3 pursuits and a couple of shootings later, just had a second front end rebuild. I blame Dodge, they should know that they need to seriously beef up the front end of a vehicle that's going to be toting the weight of a crash bar and being driven on the edge of what the car can do from time to time. And I can say that I've driven my Charger right to the absolute edge, one night when one of my guys had a pursuit, said he had 4 at gunpoint and the neighborhood was coming out on him, and then went dead silent. Smoked my brakes, my tires, and slid corners at over 130mph in what was the longest and shortest 5 miles of my life.

                            Sorry, but LAPD should have bought M5s if they wanted a BMW patrol car. My ideal patrol car would be a Charger designed to ride 1 inch higher, with a Suspension built for the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series. Oh and the Hellcat Engine, detuned about 100hp.....so you'd have an engine that isn't being overtaxed when you have to hammer the throttle.
                            Our Chargers are now all in specialty units or stripped for CID. We are Tahoe fans, but being in a city with a limited pursuit policy we never really drew on the speed; they were fast.

                            I miss the Crown Vics; yes, they ate alternators and batteries, but to me they are real police cars. I like the Tahoes well enough, but it's not the same.

                            We heard bad things about the Explorers.

                            Unless something radically changes my agency is going to have to buy panel vans and the transport kits in the coming years. The days of packing 3 or 4 into your back seat have passed.
                            Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                            • #15
                              "Oh, THAT...that's a police car..."

                              It's really too bad that the municipal deities who run these various sheriff's departments, city and town police departments and state authorities can't get together as a bargaining group and more or less come up with a universal design for a LE vehicle that has all the bells and whistles required, is easy to maintain, has modular efficiency and is safe for the operators.
                              ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
                              IN MARE IN COELO

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