Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The White House Coup - 1933

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The White House Coup - 1933

    Excerpt:
    The Business Plot (also known as The White House Coup[1]) was an alleged political conspiracy in 1933 in the United States. Retired Marine Corps Major General Smedley Butler claimed that wealthy businessmen were plotting to create a fascist veterans' organization with Butler as its leader and use it in a coup d'état to overthrow President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1934, Butler testified before the United States House of Representatives Special Committee on Un-American Activities (the "McCormack-Dickstein Committee") on these claims.[2] No one was prosecuted.

    Nonetheless, the McCormack-Dickstein Committee "delet[ed] extensive excerpts relating to Wall Street financiers including Guaranty Trust director Grayson Murphy, J.P. Morgan, the Du Pont interests, Remington Arms, and others allegedly involved in the plot attempt. Even today, in 1975, a full transcript of the hearings cannot be traced." [3]

    At the time of the incident, news media at first reported on the plot earnestly, then quickly changed course and dismissed the plot. For instance, the New York Times newsroom gave the plot front-page coverage until a New York Times editorial characterized it as a "gigantic hoax".[4] While historians have questioned how close the coup actually got to execution, most agree that some sort of "wild scheme" was contemplated and discussed.[5][6][7][8]
    ...
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_Plot
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    So how many here recall this being mentioned/taught during their high school and/or college courses in USA history ???
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

  • #2
    EXCERPT:
    ...
    An American Coup d'État?

    Some Americans regard our country as superior to other nations because we
    don't change governments by coup d'état -- and we never have. Perhaps
    because of our long tradition of power changing hands by election, we regard
    our nation as immune to the use of force for political purposes. True,
    assassins have killed four of our Presidents, but these deaths did not lead
    to turmoil and chaos; the government followed well-established procedures
    for transferring control to the men previously elected Vice President.
    Unlike other nations where assassination often leads to civil war, the
    United States has avoided this.

    How different is America from nations where political power comes quite
    directly "from the barrel of a gun"? A curious footnote to American history
    suggests that, except for the personal integrity of a remarkable American
    general, a coup d'état intended to remove President Franklin D. Roosevelt
    from office in 1934 might have plunged America into civil war.

    The General
    This remarkable man was Smedley Darlington Butler, retired U.S. Marine Corps
    Major General. Butler is the sort of person for whom the word "colorful" is
    woefully inadequate. Butler won America's highest military award for bravery
    (the Congressional Medal of Honor) twice. His style of warfare was unusual
    not only for his personal courage, but for the energy he put into avoiding
    bloodshed when it was possible to achieve his aims in other ways. Not
    surprisingly, this engendered a remarkable loyalty among the men who served
    under him -- and that loyalty was why certain men asked Butler to lead a
    military attack on Washington, D.C., with the goal of capturing President
    Roosevelt.

    Butler was more than a remarkable soldier. He served as police commissioner
    of Philadelphia during 1924-25 (on loan from the Marines), in an attempt to
    enforce Prohibition. While the effort was a failure, his insistence on
    enforcing the law against wealthy partygoers as well as poor immigrants
    established his reputation as a man of high integrity. He was not
    universally loved, but he was widely respected.

    Butler is best remembered today for his oft-quoted statement in the
    socialist newspaper Common Sense in 1935:

    I helped make Mexico and especially Tampico safe for American oil interests
    in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City
    Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen
    Central American republics for the benefit of Wall Street. The record of
    racketeering is long. I helped purify Nicaragua for the international
    banking house of Brown Brothers in 1909-12. I brought light to the Dominican
    Republic for American sugar interests in 1916. I helped make Honduras
    "right" for American fruit companies in 1903. In China in 1927 I helped see
    to it that Standard Oil went its way unmolested.... Looking back on it, I
    felt I might have given Al Capone a few hints. The best he could do was to
    operate his racket in three city districts. We Marines operated on three
    continents.

    In War Is A Racket, Butler argued for a powerful navy, but one prohibited
    from traveling more than 200 miles from the U.S. coastline. Military
    aircraft could travel no more than 500 miles from the U.S. coast, and the
    army would be prohibited from leaving the United States. Butler also
    proposed that all workers in defense industries, from the lowest laborer to
    the highest executive, be limited to "$30 a month, the same wage as the lads
    in the trenches get." He also proposed that a declaration of war should be
    passed by a plebiscite in which only those subject to conscription would be
    eligible to vote.

    >From 1935 through 1937, Butler was a spokesman for the League Against War
    and Fascism, a Communist-dominated organization of the time. He also
    participated in the Third U.S. Congress Against War and Fascism, sharing the
    platform with well-known leftists of the era, including Langston Hughes,
    Heywood Broun, and Roger Baldwin. When the Spanish Civil War (1936-39)
    threatened the collapse of the Soviet-supported Spanish government, the
    League's pacifism evaporated, and they supported intervention. Butler,
    however, remained true to his belief in non-interventionism: "What the hell
    is it our business what's going on in Spain?" But before Butler became
    involved in these causes, he had already exposed a fascist plot against his
    own government.

    The Plot
    Butler had friends in the press and Congress, so he could not be ignored
    when he came forward in late 1934 with a tale of conspiracy against
    President Roosevelt, in which he had been asked to take a leading role. At
    first glance, Butler seems an unlikely candidate for such a position. While
    Butler was a Republican, in 1932 he campaigned for Roosevelt, calling
    himself a "Republican-for-Ex-President Hoover." (Butler had a poor
    relationship with Hoover going back to their time together during the Boxer
    Rebellion.)

    But there were good reasons why someone seeking to overthrow the U.S.
    government would have wanted Butler involved. Butler was a powerful symbol
    to many American soldiers and veterans -- an enlisted man's general, one
    that spoke out for their interests while on active duty, and after
    retirement. Butler would have attracted men to his cause that would not
    otherwise have participated in a march on Washington.

    Butler would have been a good choice also because of his military skills.
    His personal courage and tactical skill would have made him a powerful
    commander of an irregular army. Finally, his ties of friendship to many
    officers still on active duty might have undermined military opposition to
    his force, as friends and colleagues sought to avoid a direct confrontation
    with him.

    Another reason that the plotters might have approached such an unlikely
    candidate was that Butler was not regarded as a great intellect. After World
    War I, the Marine Corps had began to emphasize a new college-educated
    professionalism. Butler, one of the less educated "bushwhacker" generals,
    might have seemed easy to manipulate.
    ...
    http://www.whatreallyhappened.com/WRHARTICLES/coup.html
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ^ Admittedly written from a somewhat "Left-leaning" mind-set/perspective, still provides interesting flesh to the bones of the OP.
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

    Comment


    • #3
      The "Plot" thickens ...

      Prescott Bush and the Smedley Butler “Business Plot”


      The BBC’s “Exposé” of
      Prescott Bush and Wall Street’s Attempted Fascist Coup of FDR in 1934
      http://valleyofsilicon.com/00_Google...tler-Coup5.pdf
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Again, somewhat slanted view, but further FWIW-FYI


      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
        Excerpt:
        The Business Plot (also known as The White House Coup[1]) was an alleged political conspiracy in 1933 in the United States. Retired Marine Corps Major General Smedley Butler claimed that wealthy businessmen were plotting to create a fascist veterans' organization with Butler as its leader and use it in a coup d'état to overthrow President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1934, Butler testified before the United States House of Representatives Special Committee on Un-American Activities (the "McCormack-Dickstein Committee") on these claims.[2] No one was prosecuted.

        Nonetheless, the McCormack-Dickstein Committee "delet[ed] extensive excerpts relating to Wall Street financiers including Guaranty Trust director Grayson Murphy, J.P. Morgan, the Du Pont interests, Remington Arms, and others allegedly involved in the plot attempt. Even today, in 1975, a full transcript of the hearings cannot be traced." [3]

        At the time of the incident, news media at first reported on the plot earnestly, then quickly changed course and dismissed the plot. For instance, the New York Times newsroom gave the plot front-page coverage until a New York Times editorial characterized it as a "gigantic hoax".[4] While historians have questioned how close the coup actually got to execution, most agree that some sort of "wild scheme" was contemplated and discussed.[5][6][7][8]
        ...
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_Plot
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        So how many here recall this being mentioned/taught during their high school and/or college courses in USA history ???
        Further and from the cited source/link:
        ...
        Contemporary reaction

        A New York Times editorial dismissed Butler's story as "a gigantic hoax" and a "bald and unconvincing narrative."[4][41] Thomas W. Lamont of J.P. Morgan called it "perfect moonshine".[41] Gen. Douglas MacArthur, alleged to be the back-up leader of the putsch if Butler declined, referred to it as "the best laugh story of the year."[41] Time magazine and other publications also scoffed at the allegations.

        When the committee released its report, editorials remained skeptical. Time wrote: "Also last week the House Committee on Un-American Activities [HCUAA] purported to report that a two-month investigation had convinced it that General Butler's story of a Fascist march on Washington was alarmingly true." The New York Times reported that the committee "alleged that definite proof had been found that the much publicized Fascist march on Washington, which was to have been led by Maj. Gen. Smedley D. Butler, retired, according to testimony at a hearing, was actually contemplated."[43][44]

        Separately, Veterans of Foreign Wars commander James E. Van Zandt stated to the press, "Less than two months" after Gen. Butler warned him, "he had been approached by 'agents of Wall Street' to lead a Fascist dictatorship in the United States under the guise of a 'Veterans Organization'."[45]
        ...
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_Plot
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        One item of interesting fall-out here was the House Committee on Un-American Activities [HCUAA]; Long pre-dating the political career and of Senator Joseph McCarthy, as well as operative after his career demised, much of what is referred to as "McCarthyism" was actually the workings and abuses of/by the HCUAA.
        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

        Comment

        Latest Topics

        Collapse

        • casanova
          Klaudia Tanner
          by casanova
          During a speech by the Austrian minister of defence Klaudia Tanner to the soldiers one soldier fell down. The minister helped him to stand up again. The...
          Yesterday, 23:56
        • Karri
          Doom Patrol
          by Karri
          Anyone else following?

          IMO, it's one of the rare good things to come from this whole superhero genre (which is really mostly the same as...
          Yesterday, 23:55
        • Nikki
          Iranian Nuclear Program Setback
          by Nikki
          Iran's nuclear program was at an advanced stage, this had to be done. Israel carried out this mission to buy the world some more time....
          Yesterday, 23:03
        Working...
        X