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Mass shooting in Texas

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  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    There. Are. Thousands. Of. Cases. Of. Paroles. Being. Busted. For. Violations. Of. Parole. By. Police. Officers. It. Happens. Everyday.


    For parolees who were convicted under that officer's state's code, sure.

    The shooter was committed by a military court, which (unless it has changed) has no parole system. Given he had a one-year commitment to a mental institution, it's questionable if it would be a felony, since being mentally ill is not a crime, the institution was not a penal facility, the institution was out-of-state, and a one-year sentence in Texas is a misdemeanor.

    You are still not grasping that there are 52 criminal codes in the USA. The Feds generally cannot enforce state law, and state & local agencies only enforce their state's code.

    It is certainly not 'one size fits all'.

    Leave a comment:


  • Urban hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post


    Only. The. Feds. Can. Enforce. It.

    They. Don't. Have. The. Manpower. And. The. Elements. Of. The. Offense. Make. It. Difficult. To. Prosecute.

    You. Have. Had. This. Explained. To. You. Numerous. Times. Before. But. You. Refuse. To. Grasp. Reality.
    There. Are. Thousands. Of. Cases. Of. Paroles. Being. Busted. For. Violations. Of. Parole. By. Police. Officers. It. Happens. Everyday.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    AJ, Iím not wetting myself. We are discussing current events. I realize it is a rough world, I do arm myself. I have made my peace with God.
    I also believe that if there is a law on the books that gives LEOs an edge, they should use it.


    Only. The. Feds. Can. Enforce. It.

    They. Don't. Have. The. Manpower. And. The. Elements. Of. The. Offense. Make. It. Difficult. To. Prosecute.

    You. Have. Had. This. Explained. To. You. Numerous. Times. Before. But. You. Refuse. To. Grasp. Reality.

    Leave a comment:


  • Urban hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    No, I said it is not a crime unless you are caught. In other words, to draw you a very simple picture: convicted felons are seldom impressed by the law.

    And since they have a right against unreasonable search (the Bill of Rights, ever heard of it?), the only time their possession comes to light is by chance or criminal use of said firearm.

    Every time we have a mass shooting you start wetting yourself. It's a rough world, UH: start carrying a weapon, or make your peace with the Lord. I recommend both.
    AJ, Iím not wetting myself. We are discussing current events. I realize it is a rough world, I do arm myself. I have made my peace with God.
    I also believe that if there is a law on the books that gives LEOs an edge, they should use it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    I guess thecAir Force didnít get your memo AJ
    That's a stock press release.

    They are 'moving forward very quickly'. I've used that line more than once.

    It means nothing. Where is 'forward'? When is 'very quickly'?

    And nothing addressing a change in the retention, release, and long-term keeper-of-records issues that are required by civilian courts before they will accept military court rulings as valid.

    'Very quickly' means 'several serious-sounding memos and waiting for the press to lose interest, which is only days away'.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    So according to You paroled felons have the right to be armed,
    Please explain these stories.

    You just said this just doesnít happen...
    Either you are wrong or the several thousand news stories that I found in seconds on the internet are fake news.
    No, I said it is not a crime unless you are caught. In other words, to draw you a very simple picture: convicted felons are seldom impressed by the law.

    And since they have a right against unreasonable search (the Bill of Rights, ever heard of it?), the only time their possession comes to light is by chance or criminal use of said firearm.

    Every time we have a mass shooting you start wetting yourself. It's a rough world, UH: start carrying a weapon, or make your peace with the Lord. I recommend both.

    Leave a comment:


  • Urban hermit
    replied
    I guess thecAir Force didnít get your memo AJ


    U.S. Air Force Secretary Dr. Heather Wilson said that the Air Force is "moving very forward, very quickly" with its investigation into Texas church shooter Devin Patrick Kelley's ability to purchase weapons, which may have resulted from an Air Force error.

    "The offenses for which the shooter in Texas was court martialed should have been reported and that's why we launched a full-scale review of this case and all others like it," Wilson said Thursday afternoon during a Pentagon news conference discussing the current state and future goals of the Air Force.

    The shooting on Sunday at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas left 26 people dead and wounded an additional 20.

    Although Kelley, 26, received a bad conduct discharge from the Air Force, he was still able to purchase at least two guns after passing background checks. The discharge should have prevented him from being able to purchase the weapons.

    On Monday, just one day following the shooting, the Air Force revealed that its Office of Special Investigations did not report Kelley's name to the National Criminal Information Center after he pleaded guilty to two counts of domestic violence in 2013.

    "Our approach here is to act in accordance with our values, which include integrity and excellence," Wilson said, calling the shooting "heartbreaking."

    According to Wilson, the Air Force has interviewed about 100 individuals involved in the case.

    The Air Force has also begun examining two of its databases -- an electronic version which houses data dating back to 2002 and an additional hard copy that goes back to 1996. Wilson described the process as "very labor intensive," but explained that the investigation is looking broadly to prioritize "flags and issues" that are identified within the databases.

    "Our responsibility is to look at what happened here, and why," she said.

    Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein backed Wilson's information and mourned those killed, adding that 12 of the 26 victims in the shooting have connections to the Air Force.

    Goldfein will travel to San Antonio next week and said that the Air Force is extending resources to the victims' families.

    The Air Force officials said that a draft report on the case may be expected "sometime next week."
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/air-for...tag=MSF0951a18

    Leave a comment:


  • Urban hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    Since always. It is only a crime if you get caught. There's no one really checking up on them. Oh, sure their PO will ask them 'sticking by the rules?" when they check in, and why would a convicted felon lie?

    You are a stuck record because people keep telling you 1+1=2 and you keep says 'nuh-uh! Its 3.24987!'
    So according to You paroled felons have the right to be armed,
    Please explain these stories.

    Two convicted felons arrested for having a rifle and ammunition

    http://www.mercedsunstar.com/news/article144534669.html

    Man on parole arrested after gun found beside his car
    http://www.pbcommercial.com/article/...NEWS/308189951

    Man on parole arrested after gun found
    http://www.pbcommercial.com/news/201...fter-gun-found

    You just said this just doesnít happen...
    Either you are wrong or the several thousand news stories that I found in seconds on the internet are fake news.
    Last edited by Urban hermit; 10 Nov 17, 23:02.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    Iím a stuck record?
    Since when is this a free society to the point that known felons on parole are allowed to possess firearms?
    Since always. It is only a crime if you get caught. There's no one really checking up on them. Oh, sure their PO will ask them 'sticking by the rules?" when they check in, and why would a convicted felon lie?

    You are a stuck record because people keep telling you 1+1=2 and you keep says 'nuh-uh! Its 3.24987!'

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    He beats a child, breaks his skull, caves in his rid cage, beats his wife, and you are ok with that.
    It happens every single minute of every single day in the USA. Literally.

    I have literally arrested hundreds of subjects for domestic violence, many much worse than this goober has done. I've arrested the same guys over and over again.

    This is not a new problem. There is no real cure. Jail or prison time seldom does any good.

    And every one of them can buy a firearm all day long, because only licensed dealers have to fill out your stupid form, and it is done on the honor system. No one knows how many firearms are sold by private individuals, but it is likely thousands a day.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Reimnitz View Post
    This is another troubled military officer who has all the signs of becoming a problem someday.



    http://www.military.com/daily-news/2...g-threats.html

    The shooter wasn't an officer. But there are thousands of potential mass shooters running around. Every local police agency in the USA has a half-dozen people they figure for a 'headline grab' someday.

    Leave a comment:


  • Urban hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    Neither are true, as I have noted in earlier posts.



    And for the last time: there is no protocol. The Feds would not have charged him. It does not work that way.



    I don't take it personal. I'm trying to explain to you that you have completely missed the entire point. People like you are why the AF brass said what they said: because your inability to listen to facts make it much simpler to shut you up with a simple lie.



    What radar?

    There's no radar.

    If someone violates the terms of the plea agreement a warrant will be issued for them (eventually, the lag time is often months). But there isn't an agency that is going to hunt him down. The warrant goes on the computer in case the guy surfaces.

    Given he had a one year mental commitment, the odds are overwhelmingly good they wouldn't even bother to issue a warrant, and if he was arrested he would be released on his own recognizance, and get a court-ordered exam weeks or months later, which might, but probably wouldn't, result in another brief stay.

    Because being mentally ill is not a crime.

    And none of this would prevent him from getting a firearm.

    I'm done. You're like a stuck record. The guy was one of several million insane people walking the streets of the USA. That's not a crime. No one tracks their movements, because it is a free society.
    Iím a stuck record?
    Since when is this a free society to the point that known felons on parole are allowed to possess firearms?

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    Easy quiz.
    You are a Texas law enforcement officer, you pull over a citizen for a traffic violation. When you run the drivers information it comes back that he is on parole and not allowed to possess firearms.
    Upon returning to the vehicle you see a firearm on the backseat.
    Do you
    A. Because the driver is in violation of a federal law, you return his drivers license and issue him a citation for the traffic violation and let him go on his way.
    B. You arrest the driver for violation of his parole?
    C. Parole status is not provided on routine traffic stops. It isn't easy to come by, either. Parolees have right, remember?

    Just making stuff up is silly, UH. You haven't a clue how the system works.

    Texas has a statute banning felons from possessing firearms, and we enforce it. But if the guy was on parole for a Federal offense we would likely secure the weapon and release the guy unless the Feds got a detainer very, very quickly. Which would be exceeding rare.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    Before he killed those 26 people, before he wounded the others, you know damn well his record would have kept him from LEGALLY purchasing weapons.
    You also know that his lying on the ATF form, would have garnered him federal charges that would ha e taken him off the streets.
    Neither are true, as I have noted in earlier posts.

    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    But because someone screwed up, and failed to follow protocol he slipped through the cracks.
    And for the last time: there is no protocol. The Feds would not have charged him. It does not work that way.

    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    The Air Force brass have admitted it. This has nothing to do with Texas law enforcement. So donít take it personal.
    I don't take it personal. I'm trying to explain to you that you have completely missed the entire point. People like you are why the AF brass said what they said: because your inability to listen to facts make it much simpler to shut you up with a simple lie.

    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    This guy violated the terms of his plea agreement. But because that agreement was never shared with the Feds, he operated right under the radar.
    What radar?

    There's no radar.

    If someone violates the terms of the plea agreement a warrant will be issued for them (eventually, the lag time is often months). But there isn't an agency that is going to hunt him down. The warrant goes on the computer in case the guy surfaces.

    Given he had a one year mental commitment, the odds are overwhelmingly good they wouldn't even bother to issue a warrant, and if he was arrested he would be released on his own recognizance, and get a court-ordered exam weeks or months later, which might, but probably wouldn't, result in another brief stay.

    Because being mentally ill is not a crime.

    And none of this would prevent him from getting a firearm.

    I'm done. You're like a stuck record. The guy was one of several million insane people walking the streets of the USA. That's not a crime. No one tracks their movements, because it is a free society.

    Leave a comment:


  • Urban hermit
    replied
    Easy quiz.
    You are a Texas law enforcement officer, you pull over a citizen for a traffic violation. When you run the drivers information it comes back that he is on parole and not allowed to possess firearms.
    Upon returning to the vehicle you see a firearm on the backseat.
    Do you
    A. Because the driver is in violation of a federal law, you return his drivers license and issue him a citation for the traffic violation and let him go on his way.
    B. You arrest the driver for violation of his parole?

    Leave a comment:

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