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  • Well its the truth. Crazy people shouldn't have access to guns. I'm having a hell of a time disarming my dad and he's so delusional that he gets confused whether its night or day. Oh its at the crazy point of rage at random moments.

    Any Help would be welcome.

    PS. This isn't trolling. If not my life what about the social workers who show up to do physical therapy.
    Last edited by Bwaha; 06 Nov 17, 21:13.
    Credo quia absurdum.


    Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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    • Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
      Well its the truth. Crazy people shouldn't have access to guns. I'm having a hell of a time disarming my dad and he's so delusional that he gets confused whether its night or day. Oh its at the crazy point of rage at random moments.

      Any Help would be welcome.

      PS. This isn't trolling. If not my life what about the social workers who show up to do physical therapy.
      Pennsylvania has what's called an Act 302. You show evidence that someone is likely to harm themselves or others and the police come and commit them. They get analyzed and prescription drugs, but I'm not sure how long they stay. The catch is the person can no longer own guns or work for the government.

      We also have an Act 201, which is the same thing except the person voluntarily commits themselves. With this the person can still own guns and I think still work for the government.

      You can call your local or state police and ask them if they have something like this. Or you can try to to get him to see a therapist, but that could be expensive. You might be able to get state-provided therapy, but you would have to check with the police or the crisis ward at your local hospital.
      "It is a fine fox chase, my boys"

      "It is well that war is so terrible-we would grow too fond of it"

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      • Originally posted by American87 View Post
        Pennsylvania has what's called an Act 302. You show evidence that someone is likely to harm themselves or others and the police come and commit them. They get analyzed and prescription drugs, but I'm not sure how long they stay. The catch is the person can no longer own guns or work for the government.

        We also have an Act 201, which is the same thing except the person voluntarily commits themselves. With this the person can still own guns and I think still work for the government.

        You can call your local or state police and ask them if they have something like this. Or you can try to to get him to see a therapist, but that could be expensive. You might be able to get state-provided therapy, but you would have to check with the police or the crisis ward at your local hospital.
        Most states have something like that. But, the most someone can initially be held unless their truly a danger to themselves or others (meaning clearly and actually violent most of the time) is 24 to 48 hours.
        Beyond that, they have to be seen by professionals and determined to be unable to function in society for whatever reason. Then they're held for a week or two at most. Getting someone committed requires a court hearing and will only get them a year, and that is usually only supervised release to the streets with a program they have to attend regularly.

        So, the only way to lock up someone really dangerous is to have them commit some violent crime they can be arrested for and tossed in jail or prison.

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        • In their constant effort to take the right of self-defense from law-abiding citizens (criminals don't obey the Law, the Left has ignored the fact that this latest guy was taken down by an armed civilian.

          BTW- any word on the great common denominator; what Meds was this guy on?

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          • Originally posted by American87 View Post
            Pennsylvania has what's called an Act 302. You show evidence that someone is likely to harm themselves or others and the police come and commit them. They get analyzed and prescription drugs, but I'm not sure how long they stay. The catch is the person can no longer own guns or work for the government.
            72 hours.

            And they can only be barred from firearms by a court order. Which is as tough to get as in any state.
            Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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            • Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
              In their constant effort to take the right of self-defense from law-abiding citizens (criminals don't obey the Law, the Left has ignored the fact that this latest guy was taken down by an armed civilian.

              BTW- any word on the great common denominator; what Meds was this guy on?
              About 1/6 of Americans are on anti-depressants, according to a study from last year, so it’s a broad pool. Even if he was on pills, medication could just be a correlation to another factor such as one of a variety of mental illnesses, for example.

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              • Originally posted by Daemon of Decay View Post
                About 1/6 of Americans are on anti-depressants, according to a study from last year, so it’s a broad pool. Even if he was on pills, medication could just be a correlation to another factor such as one of a variety of mental illnesses, for example.
                The problem isn't that people are mentally ill. The problem is that our gun laws are mentally ill.
                "I just start kissing them. It's like a magnet. I just kiss. I don't even wait. You can do anything... Grab them by the [redacted]. You can do anything."
                -The President of the United States of America.

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                • Originally posted by Daemon of Decay View Post
                  About 1/6 of Americans are on anti-depressants, according to a study from last year, so it’s a broad pool. Even if he was on pills, medication could just be a correlation to another factor such as one of a variety of mental illnesses, for example.
                  Incidentally I know from personal experience that if doctors prescribe the wrong dugs it can mess people up, because 20 years ago my doc prescribed anti-depressants for me even though I told her I wasn't depressed!
                  Me- "I'm feeling a bit tired and run down"
                  Her- "You're depressed"
                  Me- "No I'm not"
                  Her "Yes you are".

                  So I started taking them to please her and felt like I was on another planet in some kind of parallel-universe dream. I never actually felt like killing anybody, I stopped taking them and flushed the rest down the loo and my head began to clear from that point on.

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                  • Originally posted by Daemon of Decay View Post
                    About 1/6 of Americans are on anti-depressants, according to a study from last year, so it’s a broad pool. Even if he was on pills, medication could just be a correlation to another factor such as one of a variety of mental illnesses, for example.
                    Or post menopausal women, people on certain types of heart medicine, to name two large groups.

                    In addition many users take them only for a period and then stop, such as after the death of a loved one. Since the most common varieties are non-narcotic they can be used to help people in a transitional event.

                    I would not see the presence of such meds as significant unless there are other factors involved.
                    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                      Or post menopausal women, people on certain types of heart medicine, to name two large groups.

                      In addition many users take them only for a period and then stop, such as after the death of a loved one. Since the most common varieties are non-narcotic they can be used to help people in a transitional event.

                      I would not see the presence of such meds as significant unless there are other factors involved.
                      Well said.

                      As humans we tend to prefer simple answers, even to complex problems. It’s why we tend to smack the side of the tv when the picture is going hazy. Is is very possible, even plausible, for there to be a correlation between medication and “insane” behavior, but there is no evidence of a causal link as of yet. Especially not when dealing with a population so big and vast.

                      But this is America, so it’s no surprise we could be making that same mistake again.

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                      • Originally posted by Poor Old Spike View Post
                        Incidentally I know from personal experience that if doctors prescribe the wrong dugs it can mess people up, because 20 years ago my doc prescribed anti-depressants for me even though I told her I wasn't depressed!
                        Me- "I'm feeling a bit tired and run down"
                        Her- "You're depressed"
                        Me- "No I'm not"
                        Her "Yes you are".

                        So I started taking them to please her and felt like I was on another planet in some kind of parallel-universe dream. I never actually felt like killing anybody, I stopped taking them and flushed the rest down the loo and my head began to clear from that point on.
                        Pain pills can do the same thing. We are overmedicated here in the states - dad received something like a month of heavy pain pills for his shoulder surgery, and only needed three days worth before he was perfectly fine.

                        Though I guess he could have made some spending money if he’d sold the extras. The free market is a glorious thing...

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                        • Originally posted by Daemon of Decay View Post
                          Pain pills can do the same thing. We are overmedicated here in the states - dad received something like a month of heavy pain pills for his shoulder surgery, and only needed three days worth before he was perfectly fine.

                          Though I guess he could have made some spending money if he’d sold the extras. The free market is a glorious thing...
                          But the bar separating success and failure is a rough one.

                          You are right, the abuse of pain meds is epidemic.

                          One extremely positive step has been the reclassification of Oxycontin; it will be prescribed much less in the future. Unfortunately, heroin is taking up the slack.
                          Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                          • Are there any restrictions on convicted criminals having guns in Texas?

                            Kelly had domestic violence convictions.
                            "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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                            • Originally posted by Surrey View Post
                              Are there any restrictions on convicted criminals having guns in Texas?

                              Kelly had domestic violence convictions.
                              Yes, unfortunately the US Air Force did not upload data on his conviction to the FBI database that tracks such convictions and is used by merchants at weapon points of sale to check on a purchasers status. So he was able to buy the weapon. This is a national program not a state level one.
                              “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
                              “To talk of many things:
                              Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
                              Of cabbages—and kings—
                              And why the sea is boiling hot—
                              And whether pigs have wings.”
                              ― Lewis Carroll

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                              • Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
                                Well its the truth. Crazy people shouldn't have access to guns. I'm having a hell of a time disarming my dad and he's so delusional that he gets confused whether its night or day. Oh its at the crazy point of rage at random moments.

                                Any Help would be welcome.

                                PS. This isn't trolling. If not my life what about the social workers who show up to do physical therapy.
                                Who will decide if/when someone is crazy?And, is it possible to prevent a crazy one to have a gun ? And, is it important ? If a crazy one wants to kill himself, someone else, he will do it, even if he has no gun .

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