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Two Officers Put on Leave After Utah Nurse Confrontation

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  • Two Officers Put on Leave After Utah Nurse Confrontation

    After watching the video and reading to article, I thinking the detective is the one who should have been tested fo mind altering drugs!
    Perfect example of a God complex wearing a badge....

    Click to expand

    "Two Officers Put on Leave After Utah Nurse Confrontation" will play after this ad - 00:03
    Two Salt Lake City police officers have been placed on paid administrative leave after a shocking video of a nurse's arrest sparked nationwide outrage.
    The Salt Lake City police department announced on Friday that it had put Detective Jeff Payne, the officer who arrested Alex Wubbels, plus a second employee, on leave "pending the results of an investigation." The second employee was not identified, but police spokeswoman Christina Judd confirmed to NBC News on Saturday that he was also a police officer.
    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/two...SUC?li=BBnb7Kz
    Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
    Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

  • #2
    The telling thing is that none of the other cops tried to calm down the a-hole cop. That just goes to prove what many of their mentalities is...us vs them, even when "them" isn't a criminal.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by johns624 View Post
      The telling thing is that none of the other cops tried to calm down the a-hole cop. That just goes to prove what many of their mentalities is...us vs them, even when "them" isn't a criminal.
      Well, to be fair, the jerk was the ranking officer there.
      Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

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      BoRG

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      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Salinator View Post
        Well, to be fair, the jerk was the ranking officer there.
        Good point. However, is that an example of the type of people they promote?

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        • #5
          He needs a reduction in rank and a nice kick in the ass for his unprofessionalism.

          Originally posted by Salinator View Post
          Well, to be fair, the jerk was the ranking officer there.
          My worst jump story:
          My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
          As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
          No lie.

          ~
          "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
          -2 Commando Jumpmaster

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          • #6
            Originally posted by johns624 View Post
            The telling thing is that none of the other cops tried to calm down the a-hole cop. That just goes to prove what many of their mentalities is...us vs them, even when "them" isn't a criminal.
            On the positive side, they refrained from using excessive force when the nurse resisted arrest...
            My most dangerous mission: I landed in the middle of an enemy tank battalion and I immediately, started spraying bullets killing everybody around me having fun up until my computer froze...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 101combatvet View Post
              He needs a reduction in rank and a nice kick in the ass for his unprofessionalism.
              Not a reduction in rank, but release from the profession. His actions were clearly illegal, and his actions demonstrate that he's emotionally unqualified to bear arms and execute violence on behalf of the state. In a sane world, he'd pay the damages to the nurse personally instead of being subsidized by the taxpayers. In an ideal world, he'd suffer the death penalty for unlawful assault under cover of law.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 82redleg View Post
                Not a reduction in rank, but release from the profession. His actions were clearly illegal, and his actions demonstrate that he's emotionally unqualified to bear arms and execute violence on behalf of the state. In a sane world, he'd pay the damages to the nurse personally instead of being subsidized by the taxpayers. In an ideal world, he'd suffer the death penalty for unlawful assault under cover of law.
                I don't think the death penalty is appropriate for this but I have to agree that he is clearly not qualified to hold a position of authority with the power to arrest, detain, or use deadly force.
                I hope they test him for steroids and illegal drugs.
                There is a growing number of officers using steroids to muscle up, roid rage is a side effect.
                Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 82redleg View Post
                  Not a reduction in rank, but release from the profession. His actions were clearly illegal, and his actions demonstrate that he's emotionally unqualified to bear arms and execute violence on behalf of the state. In a sane world, he'd pay the damages to the nurse personally instead of being subsidized by the taxpayers. In an ideal world, he'd suffer the death penalty for unlawful assault under cover of law.
                  To cover that in Blue:

                  -- Absolutely. The Cobb County LT who shot off at the mouth got canned. 28 years down the drain for being a sarcastic git who said exactly what a lot of officers think when people do the "I've seen news articles about cops doing XYZ" when they start acting positively ridiculous. The Cobb Co LT should have been given a couple of weeks off without pay.

                  This LT should be fired. Not only does that appear to be excessive force, though the nurse isn't exactly helping things, I don't see where there's lawful cause for arrest. And if there was, then they could easily go get a warrant and come back, it's not like she's going anywhere. Based on my training and experience, there are two ways to handle this, you can get a court order to obtain hospital records showing the BAC, or you can get a search warrant, in which case you have a court order telling medical personnel to assist in obtaining the sample.

                  Could they have needed a sample for part of the accident investigation? Possibly, it was involving a commercial motor vehicle driver, and those rules are slightly different than what exists for personal vehicle collisions. Did they go about it the right way......not in the least.

                  And the nurse will almost certainly get paid, from the agency AS WELL AS the officer himself. We are only covered from personal civil liability when operating lawfully within our official capacity or when we make what a reasonable person would consider to be an 'honest mistake of law' (IE we run you for a warrant, you come back with a warrant, we arrest you, we get you to the magistrate and then find out that the warrant had been dismissed/destroyed/invalidated).

                  As to the red.......don't call me to come to your house. I agree with holding officers to a higher standard than we hold the public at large. We really don't hold the public to any sort of standard of conduct these days. But to start making things capital crimes by fiat.....yeah, you can shove off with that.
                  Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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                  • #10
                    The ironic thing is that the injured man whose blood the Utah police wanted was actually a police officer himself..
                    "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
                      I don't think the death penalty is appropriate for this but I have to agree that he is clearly not qualified to hold a position of authority with the power to arrest, detain, or use deadly force.
                      Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
                      As to the red.......don't call me to come to your house. I agree with holding officers to a higher standard than we hold the public at large. We really don't hold the public to any sort of standard of conduct these days. But to start making things capital crimes by fiat.....yeah, you can shove off with that.
                      In my ideal world, we would limit crimes to willful infringements on the natural rights of others. But we would then be extremely harsh on violations of those crimes. An individual walked into a public place, where an individual was lawfully and peacefully conducting her profession, assaulted her without provocation, and kidnapped her. What would have happened if this was just a random civilian stranger? In this case, the violations mentioned are aggravated, not mitigated, by his status as a LEO- one who is charged by society to bear arms and execute violence on society's behalf. I'm not big on Grossman's sheepdog analogy, but in this case, it is appropriate- society cannot tolerate its protectors going rogue, and it needs to be dealt with harshly.

                      TacCovert, I don't want you to come to my house. I'll take care of me and mine on my own, thank you very much.

                      Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
                      ...
                      And the nurse will almost certainly get paid, from the agency AS WELL AS the officer himself. We are only covered from personal civil liability when operating lawfully within our official capacity or when we make what a reasonable person would consider to be an 'honest mistake of law' (IE we run you for a warrant, you come back with a warrant, we arrest you, we get you to the magistrate and then find out that the warrant had been dismissed/destroyed/invalidated).
                      That's the way it ought to be. Like I said, willful infringements on the natural rights of others should be crimes and punished via the judicial system as well as those responsible paying restitution. Accidental are torts and should be resolved with monetary damages.
                      Last edited by 82redleg; 03 Sep 17, 15:16. Reason: to fix quote html syntax

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                      • #12
                        I hope the cop is happy now...


                        SALT LAKE CITY A hospital patient who a Utah nurse said she was protecting when she refused to allow police to draw his blood has died.

                        William Gray, a commercial truck driver and reserve police officer, died late Monday of the injuries he suffered when a fiery July 26 crash left him with burns over nearly half his body, University of Utah Health spokeswoman Suzanne Winchester said.

                        Gray was unconscious at the Salt Lake City hospital when police detective Jeff Payne asked to draw his blood hours after the crash.
                        http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/pat...zMP?li=BBnb7Kz
                        Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                        Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

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                        • #13
                          That's sad. It also shows you how bad a condition he was in when the a-hole cop wanted his blood sample.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by johns624 View Post
                            That's sad. It also shows you how bad a condition he was in when the a-hole cop wanted his blood sample.
                            That was my first thought when this story began, the University of Utah Medical Burn Unit specialize in treating burn cases beyond what other medical centers can provide.
                            Patients from all over the western US are transported there, if the driver was sent there he was in really bad shape, I doubt he ever gained consciousness.
                            Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                            Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
                              That was my first thought when this story began, the University of Utah Medical Burn Unit specialize in treating burn cases beyond what other medical centers can provide.
                              Patients from all over the western US are transported there, if the driver was sent there he was in really bad shape, I doubt he ever gained consciousness.
                              Thanks for keeping us updated, looks like this case isn't being forgotten.

                              Now this will come full circle back to the issue that I think set this off in the first place;
                              Will the Cops be sued for engaging in that high-speed pursuit in the first place?

                              If they hadn't been panicked by that very thought, I doubt they would even have thought of asking for that sample, and then revealed to everyone what bad cops they are... and this story would never have become known outside of Utah.
                              "Why is the Rum gone?"

                              -Captain Jack

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