Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Question On Relieved Of Command On USS Fitzgerald

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Question On Relieved Of Command On USS Fitzgerald

    Now I admit I have been retired from the Navy for over 35 years so things might have changed more than I thought. Therefore to satisfy my own curiosity would like a comment about the Command Master Chief being relieved of duty.

    Now I was the Senior Enlisted Advisor aboard my last command. Now my duties was to be the interface between the enlisted personnel and the XO. Bringing anything to his attention that affected the ship's enlisted company, this was normally brought to my attention by the other Chiefs, or if I observed irregularities, this was normally handled by a heart to heart talk with the Division Chief or LPO; plus a few other additional duties. Now at no time was I responsible for the training or supervision of the enlisted ships company, well I was responsible for overseeing the Commands Surface Warfare training schedule but I don't see that as germane. Now I could see possible problem if a issue was brought to the, in this case the Command Master Chief, and he or she did not report it to the XO. Now if the XO did not do anything about the issue it would be incorrect to go over his/her head to the CO. That is unless the CO asked a specific question. So, I guess my question would be.....What would cause the Command Master Chief to be relived of duties. Maybe I just not seeing things in the proper perspective.
    Too Much To Do Too Little Time

  • #2
    Was he on the bridge? I cannot imagine that a SCPO has no other duties than those you described.
    "Ask not what your country can do for you"

    Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

    you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by FTCS View Post
      Now I admit I have been retired from the Navy for over 35 years so things might have changed more than I thought. Therefore to satisfy my own curiosity would like a comment about the Command Master Chief being relieved of duty.

      Now I was the Senior Enlisted Advisor aboard my last command. Now my duties was to be the interface between the enlisted personnel and the XO. Bringing anything to his attention that affected the ship's enlisted company, this was normally brought to my attention by the other Chiefs, or if I observed irregularities, this was normally handled by a heart to heart talk with the Division Chief or LPO; plus a few other additional duties. Now at no time was I responsible for the training or supervision of the enlisted ships company, well I was responsible for overseeing the Commands Surface Warfare training schedule but I don't see that as germane. Now I could see possible problem if a issue was brought to the, in this case the Command Master Chief, and he or she did not report it to the XO. Now if the XO did not do anything about the issue it would be incorrect to go over his/her head to the CO. That is unless the CO asked a specific question. So, I guess my question would be.....What would cause the Command Master Chief to be relived of duties. Maybe I just not seeing things in the proper perspective.
      Failing to advise the Captain that things were not up to standards, especially critical training.
      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

      Comment


      • #4
        If they are firing the senior officers, the senior enlisted men will be included. The Captain and XO knew the training was not adequate. They put the ship to sea anyway.

        Pruitt
        Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

        Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

        by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

        Comment


        • #5
          It could be as simple as the Command Master Chief was mostly a paper pusher in work and rate, and when the $h!+ hit the fan he or she was useless to the response. There are plenty of senior enlisted that are only good for riding a desk these days. When the CO is missing and most of the on watch officers are history, it falls to the Chiefs to lead. If you can't, you're toast later.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
            Was he on the bridge? I cannot imagine that a SCPO has no other duties than those you described.
            I seriously doubt that he was standing bridge watches unless he was qualified as underway JOOD or OOD.

            Well I did leave out the fact that I was also the Command Career Councilor which I was prior to assuming the duties of SEA. However, both myself and the FTM Chief were no longer working in our technical field. He was the Command PMS Coordinator. However, both of us were still assigned our GQ stations within our rating specialty and available for technical assistance which was very rarely needed. You must also realize the class of ship I was assigned to at this time. It was a Spruance class which was primarily ASW. Hence the CO made the decision that both of us could better serve the Command in the roles that were required to be filled than remove another Chief from their duties.
            I assume now that the Command Master Chief is assigned as such and not serving in his original rating specialty. His rating chevrons would be a star vice his specialty rating. Things have changed considerably since I retired so I'm not concurrent in the requirements for a SEA on the various sea going commands. I would assume that it would depend on the size of the command. The SEA could be assigned directly or the the duties would fall to the CPO with the highest seniority, I really don't know.

            As far as my duties as SEA and Command Career Counselor I was kept busy.

            After thinking about it, I realize that as SEA and Command Career Councilor I wore two hats. As the CCC I worked for the XO ans SEA I worked for the CO. ( damn old age and CRS) So, it is possible that the Fitzgerald's CMC failed to keep the CO informed on issues that were problematical. In other words he could have been a politician and technically competent in his original rating that allowed him to make rank. I don't know and unless you are or become acquainted with one of the ships CPO's you never will.
            Last edited by FTCS; 20 Aug 17, 08:35.
            Too Much To Do Too Little Time

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
              It could be as simple as the Command Master Chief was mostly a paper pusher in work and rate, and when the $h!+ hit the fan he or she was useless to the response. There are plenty of senior enlisted that are only good for riding a desk these days. When the CO is missing and most of the on watch officers are history, it falls to the Chiefs to lead. If you can't, you're toast later.
              I would have to assume that he was assigned to the ship as the Command Master Chief and his duties are mostly administrators. I don't know how it is now but aboard ship in my days the Chiefs were mostly administrators. They rely on their Division LPO to handle the everyday evolutions within the Division. If the LPO has a problem, either technical or personnel, that they can not handle then the LPO comes to the Chief and if you have a damn good LPO then that rarely never happens. The Chief is usually the firewall between the Division Officer and the Division.
              Too Much To Do Too Little Time

              Comment


              • #8
                Would he not have the same type of responsibilities as the Chief of the Boat in a submarine?

                He's the dive officer of the Boat, so that effectively puts him on the conn.

                I don't see any problem with relieving the three senior people on the ship.

                Further, one news account stated that there were also going to be 'captain's mast' proceedings against other personnel on the ship (Article 15-non-judicial punishment).
                We are not now that strength which in old days
                Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Massena View Post
                  Would he not have the same type of responsibilities as the Chief of the Boat in a submarine?

                  He's the dive officer of the Boat, so that effectively puts him on the conn.

                  I don't see any problem with relieving the three senior people on the ship.

                  Further, one news account stated that there were also going to be 'captain's mast' proceedings against other personnel on the ship (Article 15-non-judicial punishment).
                  No, not at all. A COB is usually nuke qualified, and if he is a "front-ender" then he got the short course on nuclear power so he has a clue what's going on in the back half of the sub. He'd also have to go through the whole Sub Safe program and the people already on subs are picky about who they put through the program.

                  Mast is like a misdemeanor. For junior enlisted they potentially can recover from it but in this case it could be used to give them an OTH (Other Than Honorable) discharge "at the convenience of the Navy." They get reduced in rate, have their pay docked, are placed on restriction (have to say on the ship), may get extra duty (mostly grunt work like cleaning or painting) and would lose eligibility to advance for at least the next advancement cycle.

                  For the Chiefs and officers it's easier to give them an unsat eval or fitrep. For an officer, that's a career ender. More senior officers may be allowed to ride it out in some useless job making sure a desk doesn't move until they can retire. For junior officers their best move is to resign ASAP. For Chief's retirement is the usual result unless they're under 20 and then they'll end up somewhere you and I never heard of doing nothing until that happens.

                  Busting Chiefs and officers is harder to manage and usually the Navy just wants something like this to disappear. So, those responsible disappear.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Massena View Post
                    Would he not have the same type of responsibilities as the Chief of the Boat in a submarine?

                    He's the dive officer of the Boat, so that effectively puts him on the conn.

                    I don't see any problem with relieving the three senior people on the ship.

                    Further, one news account stated that there were also going to be 'captain's mast' proceedings against other personnel on the ship (Article 15-non-judicial punishment).
                    Yes and No. They have the same basic responsibilities. However they are not part of the bridge watch team.
                    The Command Master Chief Program became effective April 12 2012 by OPNAVINST 1306.G. and was established as enlisted rating. If you are interested you can search for OPNAVINST 1306.G for further information.

                    Chief Of the Boat is a somewhat different program. For a unofficial description of the new COB programs see:
                    http://www.public.navy.mil/subfor/un.../tobeacob.html

                    Prior to that the title was Senior Enlisted Advisor and was a collateral duty. A Senior Enlisted Advisor was the senior enlisted person onboard and received no training except for experience.
                    Last edited by FTCS; 20 Aug 17, 15:46.
                    Too Much To Do Too Little Time

                    Comment

                    Latest Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X