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  • Crime pays, in Chicago, if you're a detective...

    Still wondering why Chicago has a crime problem?
    If you are a CPD Detective, crime pays around $90,000.00 per year


    CHICAGO -- Cherie Hendricks, a veteran Chicago Police Department detective, was arrested at a Louisiana Walmart on Christmas Eve for stealing $113.50 worth of reading glasses and coffee mugs.

    CBS Chicago reports that she was placed into a court-ordered diversion program, typically reserved for first-time offenders.
    This wasn't Hendricks' first incident.
    She was arrested for shoplifting more than $200 worth of vitamins in 2013 at a Chicago Whole Foods, but has not faced any discipline. The Police Department opened an internal investigation after Hendricks was caught. Four years later, CBS Chicago was told that probe is still "open and active."
    The U.S. Department of Justice's investigation into the Chicago Police Department, completed last January, found "officers are too rarely held accountable for misconduct" and "when investigations do occur they are glacially slow."
    David Bradford, a former police chief and executive director of Northwestern University's Center for Public Safety, said the lack of discipline is detrimental because "it produces bad morale within the good officers of the department and puts the credibility of the whole agency in question with the community."
    Only recently, after CBS Chicago started asking questions, did Chicago police finally close the internal investigation and recommend Hendricks be terminated. The matter now goes before the Police Board.
    CBS Chicago caught up with Hendricks but she declined to discuss the allegations.
    Hendricks was placed on desk duty in 2013, but has continued to collect an annual salary of more than $90,000. Additionally, taxpayers have picked up nearly $25,000 worth of educational expenses for her since May 2016, according to city records.
    It's unknown if she was convicted of theft in the 2013 case. Her case doesn't appear in Cook County court records and a Chicago Police spokesperson said her case had been expunged.
    The police spokesperson says the internal probe dragged on in part because Hendricks went on medical leave.
    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/...jmi?li=BBnbfcL
    Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
    Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

  • #2
    CPD is at around 80% strength last I checked. They have a massive gray-out looming, and recruitment is thin on the ground.

    It is an extreme case, but most agencies in the USA are facing hard choices about hiring and retention standards. Do you keep substandard officers, or do you accept reduced manpower levels, fewer cases investigated for prosecution, reduced police coverage?

    25 years ago my agency saw 20 qualified applicants for every opening. As of 2016 we averaged two per.

    Dallas PD is so low on manpower they can no longer patrol the entire city. Human Resources there requires a thirty-day notice of quitting or termination because they can't process the paperwork fast enough.

    It takes two months for the hiring process, six months in-service field training, two years before a new-hire is worth anything, five to seven years before an officer is ready to consider investigations or first line supervision.

    So command staff are faced with terrible choices: fire a veteran detective knowing that it will take months to replace the body, and years before you regain anything remotely close to the experience level.

    So rehabilitation has become the name of the game in many agencies.

    My division contains all investigative assets in my agency, along with other specialized details. Every week my second in command reports on the available pool of Patrol officers who are suitable as replacements should we lose any specialists. The number is depressing. Should I lose any of my guys in 2017, I will be choosing from inexperienced replacements, or letting more criminal cases go by the wayside.

    You can thank Bobo and his war on law enforcement. Eight years of abuse has gravely weakened the system; if Trump cannot turn things around there is going to tough times ahead.
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

    Comment


    • #3
      Agreed on the points. And it's even more depressing in the smaller agencies. We still get enough (barely) rookies to cover openings. But a shortage of training officers bottlenecks badly, and the solution was to bring less experienced officers into FTO billets, which is inconsistent at best. Smaller agencies in my county are just ceasing to exist one by one, which is resulting in an increased workload.

      And the 'grey out' is looming practically everywhere. Nationwide, LE retirement is 20-30 years, with a few remaining longer. The conditions for LE have gotten bad enough on the ground that even guys with 10 years or less (like me) are 'counting down'.....those with 28 years are going to jet the moment their available stored up leave exceeds their remaining time in service. Within the next 4-8 years, expect agencies nationwide to change drastically as the early 90s surge into law enforcement all retires. Unless the Millenials pull a desire to do the job out of their arse, there will be crisis-level shortages nationwide. Already we're seeing cases of divisions having 2-4 retirements back to back with no one 'waiting in the wings' to replace the losses.
      Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

      Comment


      • #4
        Not unlike the reputation the Philadelphia police had around the beginning of the last century. Do these things come in long cycles?
        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MarkV View Post
          Not unlike the reputation the Philadelphia police had around the beginning of the last century. Do these things come in long cycles?
          I wouldn't say they come in cycles so much as the reporting of them is cyclical. When it's profitable for the media to report such things, they do so. With notable exceptions, never say that the media isn't very aware of the opinions of the public.......their 'courage' in reporting goes about as far as the next ratings cycle.

          The issue is always greatest in bigger departments. For one, they have more people, which naturally means more dirty cops. For another, larger agencies, especially those with unions or associations to protect their members, tend to shuffle marginal or 'slightly dirty' cops around to different precincts or different divisions because it's easier to foist the problem off somewhere across the city where you don't have to see it, than it is to confront the problem and deal with it. In a mid-size agency you have to deal with them regardless, so supervisors are more likely to push them out (whether resign, move on, or fired).
          Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
            I wouldn't say they come in cycles so much as the reporting of them is cyclical. When it's profitable for the media to report such things, they do so. With notable exceptions, never say that the media isn't very aware of the opinions of the public.......their 'courage' in reporting goes about as far as the next ratings cycle.

            The issue is always greatest in bigger departments. For one, they have more people, which naturally means more dirty cops. For another, larger agencies, especially those with unions or associations to protect their members, tend to shuffle marginal or 'slightly dirty' cops around to different precincts or different divisions because it's easier to foist the problem off somewhere across the city where you don't have to see it, than it is to confront the problem and deal with it. In a mid-size agency you have to deal with them regardless, so supervisors are more likely to push them out (whether resign, move on, or fired).
            Plus factor in affirmative action. If your agency only has one lesbian or black officer or whatever, the bar for termination rises very high.

            If it were only bad cops it wouldn't be so bad, but the media witch hunt and Bobo's efforts are letting things like the Ferguson shooting and Freddie Gray, both perfectly legitimate, become detrimental to police recruiting.

            The rule used to be that if you are right, you have nothing to fear. That is gone. The chances of a Bobo or Hillabeast taking office with hostile intent towards all LEOs during your career is too high. Taking the long view, the incentive to be a police officer has been deliberately eroded.

            It would be different if the media was penalized for manufacturing stories, but the exact opposite is true.

            I was eligible to retire in 2009. When I do pull the pin, the pool of replacements testing for my job will have 10-12 years less experience, and a median 3-4 years to go before retirement.

            Its not just bodies, but expensive training and irreplaceable experience that is bleeding away.
            Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

            Comment


            • #7
              She was in Louisiana... She was just doing what the local cops do...

              Comment


              • #8
                Chicago has the added challenge of outright open gang turf wars and no political support to stand up to it.
                The detective in this article should be dismissed.
                Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
                  Chicago has the added challenge of outright open gang turf wars and no political support to stand up to it.
                  The detective in this article should be dismissed.
                  If they are guilty. Remember, in the USA you are innocent until proven guilty. That pesky Bill of Rights you keep running into.

                  One thing that gets in the way of these situations when petty offenses is involved is if the store doesn't want to press charges or bungles the shoplifting process.

                  An officer, unlike most shoplifters, will have a good lawyer and a solid working knowledge of procedure.

                  I don't know if this woman is guilty or not, but you had better have your ducks in a row when you go after someone on the CJ system.
                  Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    She's a female, agency veteran, in a union, who went on FMLA.

                    That explains why she hasn't been fired. Firing her would be writing the lawsuit. Between Affirmative Action, Union contract rules, and Family Medical Leave Act regulations, she is practically bulletproof from an agency standpoint.

                    OTOH, I work for a Sheriff in a right to work state.....getting arrested would have been more than enough to be terminated.
                    Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
                      She's a female, agency veteran, in a union, who went on FMLA.

                      That explains why she hasn't been fired. Firing her would be writing the lawsuit. Between Affirmative Action, Union contract rules, and Family Medical Leave Act regulations, she is practically bulletproof from an agency standpoint.

                      OTOH, I work for a Sheriff in a right to work state.....getting arrested would have been more than enough to be terminated.
                      We're civil service in a right to work state. Without a guilty verdict termination in this situation would be impossible.

                      Even with a guilty verdict and termination, she would have a 50-50 chance of keeping her license.

                      We've haven't had a theft issue in decades. Booze-related debauchery on out-of-city training events, on the other hand....
                      Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                        We're civil service in a right to work state. Without a guilty verdict termination in this situation would be impossible.

                        Even with a guilty verdict and termination, she would have a 50-50 chance of keeping her license.

                        We've haven't had a theft issue in decades. Booze-related debauchery on out-of-city training events, on the other hand....
                        What happens at the NTOA conference stays at the NTOA conference.
                        Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
                          What happens at the NTOA conference stays at the NTOA conference.


                          Thank the Lord my wild days were pre-social media....
                          Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                            CPD is at around 80% strength last I checked. They have a massive gray-out looming, and recruitment is thin on the ground.

                            It is an extreme case, but most agencies in the USA are facing hard choices about hiring and retention standards. Do you keep substandard officers, or do you accept reduced manpower levels, fewer cases investigated for prosecution, reduced police coverage?

                            25 years ago my agency saw 20 qualified applicants for every opening. As of 2016 we averaged two per.

                            Dallas PD is so low on manpower they can no longer patrol the entire city. Human Resources there requires a thirty-day notice of quitting or termination because they can't process the paperwork fast enough.

                            It takes two months for the hiring process, six months in-service field training, two years before a new-hire is worth anything, five to seven years before an officer is ready to consider investigations or first line supervision.

                            So command staff are faced with terrible choices: fire a veteran detective knowing that it will take months to replace the body, and years before you regain anything remotely close to the experience level.

                            So rehabilitation has become the name of the game in many agencies.

                            My division contains all investigative assets in my agency, along with other specialized details. Every week my second in command reports on the available pool of Patrol officers who are suitable as replacements should we lose any specialists. The number is depressing. Should I lose any of my guys in 2017, I will be choosing from inexperienced replacements, or letting more criminal cases go by the wayside.

                            You can thank Bobo and his war on law enforcement. Eight years of abuse has gravely weakened the system; if Trump cannot turn things around there is going to tough times ahead.
                            Wrong answer, because the LEO's set the standard for the public. Corrupt officers means the citizens see no reason to stay legal, nor should they.

                            And you don't let cases slide - you work longer and harder just like every other American has had to when lay-offs occurred. You still have a job to do, one that you chose to do voluntarily.

                            The rest of us have been there, had to do that, and do not sympathize with your reason for letting things" go by the wayside". Or maybe your local ER doc should let your case "go by the wayside" because his ER is understaffed and he is grossly overworked?
                            Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                              Wrong answer, because the LEO's set the standard for the public. Corrupt officers means the citizens see no reason to stay legal, nor should they.


                              As I noted, you need a conviction to prove corruption. She was only arrested.

                              Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                              And you don't let cases slide - you work longer and harder just like every other American has had to when lay-offs occurred. You still have a job to do, one that you chose to do voluntarily.
                              And one that pays by the hour. Working longer is not always an option, given budget issues. Not to mention we can't order officers to work overtime.

                              We have always let cases slide, even in the fat years. There is only X amount of man-hours and resources available. When the caseloads exceed X, and they do every year, triage occurs. That is as old as law enforcement.

                              Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                              The rest of us have been there, had to do that, and do not sympathize with your reason for letting things" go by the wayside". Or maybe your local ER doc should let your case "go by the wayside" because his ER is understaffed and he is grossly overworked?
                              They do. Its call triage, as you well know. They do what they can with what they have.

                              It ain't the Army, MM. You don't just order someone to work extra shifts and it happens.
                              Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                              Comment

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