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How to milk the system, and get away with murder..

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  • grishnak
    replied
    Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
    Ok, in french "malheur" means "misfortune" in English.So for us , it happened in the county of the lake of misfortune.Pretty exotic , isn't it?
    Made my day personally, but I am happy with very few things

    Leave a comment:


  • Urban hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    No evidence was mishandled. The court ruled him insane. Its not an exact science.

    He did twenty years; far more than most killers. Its only on TV where they lock 'em up forever.

    In my burg we had a guy who on the books is serving life for murder in Mass. But he is out of prison, in Texas under a Super Intensive Supervision Program.

    Just how supervised do you think he was?

    As it turns out, just enough to get murdered down here.

    In this case the psychologist monitoring him while he was doing his twenty years in a hospital, not a prision, (with privileges that allowed him much more freedom than a prison, which by the way, is exactly what he and his lawyer wanted), advised the review board against releasing him as he was a high risk to reoffending and even warned the board who would be his next victim.
    Of course he could not predict the ass would also drive head on into a family killing both parents, leaving behind three children with injuries and no parents.
    It was these kind of things that drives many LEOs to drink or worse.
    I do not view LEOs as a part of the Justice System, nor should they be, you are law enforcement, and not judge or jury or prosecutor, so please do not take my criticism of the justice system personally.
    All LEOs can do is make arrest, collect evidence make reports to the prosecution and bare witness in cases like this.
    It's a shame the state wasted time and money on psychological reports only to ignore them and put citizens and LEOs at risk.
    I would have billed him for the bullet and placed it in the back of his head.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Moulin View Post
    but I thought a man could be acquitted/get a new trial if lawyers/prosecutors/police etc hold back evidence/falsify evidence/etc--so shouldn't it go the other way also?
    No evidence was mishandled. The court ruled him insane. Its not an exact science.

    He did twenty years; far more than most killers. Its only on TV where they lock 'em up forever.

    In my burg we had a guy who on the books is serving life for murder in Mass. But he is out of prison, in Texas under a Super Intensive Supervision Program.

    Just how supervised do you think he was?

    As it turns out, just enough to get murdered down here.

    Leave a comment:


  • Moulin
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    Not an issue. A defense attorney must do the best he or she can to defend their client even if they know the client is guilty. That is at the heart of the system.

    The average killer serves 8 -10 calendar years. This guy served 20.

    Call it a win and move on.
    but I thought a man could be acquitted/get a new trial if lawyers/prosecutors/police etc hold back evidence/falsify evidence/etc--so shouldn't it go the other way also?

    Leave a comment:


  • Urban hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Snowygerry View Post
    Well this is a history board, forgive me.

    In addition to what Seb said, "per malheur" is used here in Flanders also in the sense of "by coincidence" , don't know if the French use it the same manner.

    Still I figured there may have been an interesting, well... history to the name.



    Yes, sorry again.

    Perhaps you should join a murder and petty crime board

    People get murdered all the time, that's totally uninteresting.
    Rereading the article today I had to contemplate your question a bit.
    This wasn't merely a murder, this guy killed his first wife, conspired with his lawyer and a shrink who has now been booted from the shrink industry for his poor practices.
    He cost the tax payers 30k per month for 20 years.
    The shrink that treated him while he was institutionalized warned the panel that released him that he would most likely kill again, soon.
    He then kidbapped his present girl friend who had restraining orders on him, stabbed her while he drove his vehicle then ran his truck head on into a van carrying a family and killed a father, a mother and seriously injured innocent children.
    All because our justice system cares nothing about justice. How many lives have been destroyed by this one man, his lawyer and his phony shrink?
    And you don't care. I believe it.
    Last edited by Urban hermit; 31 Mar 17, 20:40.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    Except he wasn't in a prison and when he walked out he wasn't on parole, he was a freeman.
    Parole never stopped a crime.

    Twenty years inside is a win. A lot of murderers do far less.

    Leave a comment:


  • Urban hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Snowygerry View Post
    Well this is a history board, forgive me.

    In addition to what Seb said, "per malheur" is used here in Flanders also in the sense of "by coincidence" , don't know if the French use it the same manner.

    Still I figured there may have been an interesting, well... history to the name.



    Yes, sorry again.

    Perhaps you should join a murder and petty crime board

    People get murdered all the time, that's totally uninteresting.
    If you don't like the topic stay off it

    Leave a comment:


  • Moulin
    replied
    who isn't 'insane'' when they murder?
    I think if you really are ''insane'' when you murder, you are more dangerous than the passion/impulse killer that kills for something like killing someone for sleeping with their wife/etc..
    Hinckley should be in prison for life

    Leave a comment:


  • Snowygerry
    replied
    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
    The real question is why did you post this? It has nothing to do with the thread.
    Well this is a history board, forgive me.

    In addition to what Seb said, "per malheur" is used here in Flanders also in the sense of "by coincidence" , don't know if the French use it the same manner.

    Still I figured there may have been an interesting, well... history to the name.

    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    Totally off topic,
    A man has murdered several people and all you want to know is how the county in which he committed his latest crimes got named?
    Yes, sorry again.

    Perhaps you should join a murder and petty crime board

    People get murdered all the time, that's totally uninteresting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Urban hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    Very few 'never see daylight again'.

    Twenty years inside is much better than average. Like I said, call it a win.
    Except he wasn't in a prison and when he walked out he wasn't on parole, he was a freeman.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    THE state appointed psychiatrist examined him and testified that he was sane and should face trial,
    In his own words he stated
    “The psychiatrist said that I wasn’t crazy, there was nothing wrong with me,” he testified. “And my attorney advised me to keep that quiet and we’ll try to get you another psychiatrist.”

    Justice was not served, he should have never seen daylight again
    Very few 'never see daylight again'.

    Twenty years inside is much better than average. Like I said, call it a win.

    Leave a comment:


  • Urban hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    Not an issue. A defense attorney must do the best he or she can to defend their client even if they know the client is guilty. That is at the heart of the system.

    The average killer serves 8 -10 calendar years. This guy served 20.

    Call it a win and move on.
    THE state appointed psychiatrist examined him and testified that he was sane and should face trial,
    In his own words he stated
    “The psychiatrist said that I wasn’t crazy, there was nothing wrong with me,” he testified. “And my attorney advised me to keep that quiet and we’ll try to get you another psychiatrist.”

    Justice was not served, he should have never seen daylight again

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
    Ok, in french "malheur" means "misfortune" in English.So for us , it happened in the county of the lake of misfortune.Pretty exotic , isn't it?
    Made my day personally, but I am happy with very few things
    Well, it's good to know that it takes so little to keep you happy. Based on that, our Grand Teton mountains ought to make you positively delirious.

    Leave a comment:


  • sebfrench76
    replied
    Ok, in french "malheur" means "misfortune" in English.So for us , it happened in the county of the lake of misfortune.Pretty exotic , isn't it?
    Made my day personally, but I am happy with very few things

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
    I let Snowy explaining you why , but it has a so delicious taste for us , Francophones
    What does? Naming counties or hijacking threads?

    Leave a comment:

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