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  • #16
    Originally posted by Jazsa View Post
    High Speed Rail is a darling child of the left. The 'High Speed' part is in name only as the design requirements for speed are usually thrown out the window ie to many stations.

    If Elon's Hyperloop can be made viable then I think that would be a good fit for the LA - SF route. Although I can see a Hyperloop project being made completely unviable after California's regulation and bureaucracy storm hits it.

    Since you mention the Hyperloop project, allow me to add this.


    Hyperloop teams from the Netherlands and Germany were the main winners at a competition organised by SpaceX this weekend.

    Out of a total of 27 teams from the US and around the world, the Europeans were among the only three teams to proceed to the final stage of the competition on Sunday (29 January) and successfully completed test runs with their scaled-down prototype pods in a 1.25-kilometre Hyperloop tube.

    https://dailyplanet.climate-kic.org/...in-california/
    Last year, Hyperloop One signed a deal to build a Hyperloop connecting Dubai with the greater United Arab Emirates by 2020.

    People will be able to go from Dubai to Abu Dhabi in 12 minutes, or Dubai to Riyadh in 48 minutes, or connecting Dubai International Airport and Al Maktoum Airport with a 6 minute trip.
    "Never argue with an idiot. They'll just drag you down to their level, then beat you with experience" George Carlin

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    • #17
      When it comes to high speed rail, if a company could get sufficient private investment, and if that company could keep on task, then it could be possible to create a single rail line following the I-5 corridor which could make a profit as a high speed rail connector. Only have stops in the major metropolitan centers, streamlined check in to allow business travelers to get there closer to departure vice waiting in line at the airport, constant WiFi and cell connectivity, dining cars, and so on.

      With trains running on Japanese or Swiss timing, and at a constant speed on the rails of 125mph-200mph, even counting a stop in Anaheim you're looking at San Diego to LA in an hour. LA to Fresno in an hour and a half, two tops, with a quick stop in Bakersfield. Fresno to Sacramento, with stops in San Fran and San Jose, 3 hours. Full trip from San Diego to Sacramento in 6 hours. Figure right now you're looking at a 2 hour-ish flight (counting tarmac time) with another hour to two to get through security....so 4 hours of time to take the flight. With 20 minute check-in for the train, and being able to spend all your time on the train doing business work, taking calls, eating, and so on.....even the extra time spent would be productive time and allow the business traveler to exit the train relatively fresh and ready for business. I'd do something like a 5am 'business express' train that guarantees arrival by noon....from Sacramento to San Diego, and the reverse. The afternoon trains can bring business travelers back, or handle other passengers.

      That's about the only profitable way to do it, and you're looking at a LOT of years before you're profitable. Popular, that would take only a year or so of trains running on time and good service. But California is like the NE in being one of the few places where a number of big metropolitan areas line up in a straight line that would allow high speed rail to outrun planes.

      Overall, high speed rail is a dud in the US. And this scheme was obviously more of a money grab than a serious attempt at it. If the market is there, then the market will build it.
      Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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      • #18
        Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
        When it comes to high speed rail, if a company could get sufficient private investment, and if that company could keep on task, then it could be possible to create a single rail line following the I-5 corridor which could make a profit as a high speed rail connector. Only have stops in the major metropolitan centers, streamlined check in to allow business travelers to get there closer to departure vice waiting in line at the airport, constant WiFi and cell connectivity, dining cars, and so on.

        With trains running on Japanese or Swiss timing, and at a constant speed on the rails of 125mph-200mph, even counting a stop in Anaheim you're looking at San Diego to LA in an hour. LA to Fresno in an hour and a half, two tops, with a quick stop in Bakersfield. Fresno to Sacramento, with stops in San Fran and San Jose, 3 hours. Full trip from San Diego to Sacramento in 6 hours. Figure right now you're looking at a 2 hour-ish flight (counting tarmac time) with another hour to two to get through security....so 4 hours of time to take the flight. With 20 minute check-in for the train, and being able to spend all your time on the train doing business work, taking calls, eating, and so on.....even the extra time spent would be productive time and allow the business traveler to exit the train relatively fresh and ready for business. I'd do something like a 5am 'business express' train that guarantees arrival by noon....from Sacramento to San Diego, and the reverse. The afternoon trains can bring business travelers back, or handle other passengers.

        That's about the only profitable way to do it, and you're looking at a LOT of years before you're profitable. Popular, that would take only a year or so of trains running on time and good service. But California is like the NE in being one of the few places where a number of big metropolitan areas line up in a straight line that would allow high speed rail to outrun planes.

        Overall, high speed rail is a dud in the US. And this scheme was obviously more of a money grab than a serious attempt at it. If the market is there, then the market will build it.


        I find the I-5 corridor moves a lot of freight. A Hyperloop system on I-5 for freight could be profitable.
        "Never argue with an idiot. They'll just drag you down to their level, then beat you with experience" George Carlin

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Reimnitz View Post
          Since you mention the Hyperloop project, allow me to add this.




          Last year, Hyperloop One signed a deal to build a Hyperloop connecting Dubai with the greater United Arab Emirates by 2020.

          People will be able to go from Dubai to Abu Dhabi in 12 minutes, or Dubai to Riyadh in 48 minutes, or connecting Dubai International Airport and Al Maktoum Airport with a 6 minute trip.
          Reimnitz I respect your viewpoint and your examples and I know that you are a resident of the USA and I know that you know that one can not compare us to smaller countries where Trains are invaluable to transportation, here they have only a value of carrying freight, I was stationed in Germany (and had a car) I found Trains to be very useful, but here they are a bottomless money pit, they can not sustain themselves (not enough takers) because of the proximity of where people live and where they want to go, Trains don't go where people want to go, only Subways and Metro's in large Cities do, Public Transportation and Trains, for instance here in Texas where I live will never work, because it can't, reason, progressives been trying for decades and it never will.
          Our Federal Government was trying to get us to quit smoking for Decades and mostly succeeded, but getting us out of our Cars, will never succeed.
          Trying hard to be the Man, that my Dog believes I am!

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Trung Si View Post
            Our Federal Government was trying to get us to quit smoking for Decades and mostly succeeded, but getting us out of our Cars, will never succeed.
            I'm not so sure about that. If the federal government continues to make increasing demands for safety and efficiency in automobiles, they will likely price them out of the reach of most buyers. If you add onerous insurance and licensing requirements that just adds to the process.
            Then throw in excessive repair costs if the vehicle breaks because of its complexity due to the same regulations. The government can literally regulate buyers out of the market without ever restricting their ability to buy directly.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
              I'm not so sure about that. If the federal government continues to make increasing demands for safety and efficiency in automobiles, they will likely price them out of the reach of most buyers. If you add onerous insurance and licensing requirements that just adds to the process.
              Then throw in excessive repair costs if the vehicle breaks because of its complexity due to the same regulations. The government can literally regulate buyers out of the market without ever restricting their ability to buy directly.
              Of course the flip side is that it will force purchase of mopeds. Rather than making rail viable. Reason is that rail just isn't viable for vast swathes of the country, the Northeast I-95 corridor and the California I-5 corridor being the only two I can think right off, with maybe a spot around the Chicago area that's viable as well for metro to metro rail transit.

              Regulating Americans out of the Auto market won't make America into Europe, with high speed trains and all that jazz. It will make America into Vietnam, where mopeds are the primary form of transportation.
              Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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