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"Millenials not choosing politics as a means of 'making a difference'"

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  • "Millenials not choosing politics as a means of 'making a difference'"

    This morning NYC's local NPR affiliate (audio will likely be available in a few hours) is broadcasting a bit about how "Millenials" -- those born roughly between 1985 and 2001, give or take -- while interested in "making a difference," are declaring little to no interest in political careers. Maybe in Georgian Britain or Republican Rome or Mandarin China the best and the brightest chose careers in politics, but among Americans politics has traditionally been viewed as a pit of corruption and mendacity -- and the historical record has generally proven it. As I look across the oceans blue to the British Isles, to Europe, to Asia, and throughout the Americas, it's pretty clear that the best and brightest are eschewing public life there too. Can it be that our young people are telling us something, that traditional notions of nation-state and national government -- and perhaps politics in general -- are obsolete, no longer able to perform their assigned functions within our societies?
    I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

  • #2
    Or could they be more likely telling us that "public service" is not their idea of a lucrative and rewarding career?

    I'll bet on that interpretation, since the Millenials largely eschew military service, as well.
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
      Or could they be more likely telling us that "public service" is not their idea of a lucrative and rewarding career?
      Based solely on the politicians who get caught, I'd think politics a very lucrative and rewarding career.

      Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
      I'll bet on that interpretation, since the Millenials largely eschew military service, as well.
      Since Baby-Boomers so eschewed military service that the government felt compelled to institute a draft in order to meet manpower requirements, can not the same accusation be thrown at Millenials' grandparents, as well?

      Though truth be told, were I 18 today, I wouldn't enlist on a bet. Matter of fact, if my kids ever expressed an interest in military service, I'd break their legs.

      While it's far easier to blame today's 20-year old for the condition of the world they're only now entering, I though it more edifying to ask about the condition of the world that we're bequeathing to our children.
      I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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      • #4
        Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
        This morning NYC's local NPR affiliate (audio will likely be available in a few hours) is broadcasting a bit about how "Millenials" -- those born roughly between 1985 and 2001, give or take -- while interested in "making a difference," are declaring little to no interest in political careers. Maybe in Georgian Britain or Republican Rome or Mandarin China the best and the brightest chose careers in politics, but among Americans politics has traditionally been viewed as a pit of corruption and mendacity -- and the historical record has generally proven it. As I look across the oceans blue to the British Isles, to Europe, to Asia, and throughout the Americas, it's pretty clear that the best and brightest are eschewing public life there too. Can it be that our young people are telling us something, that traditional notions of nation-state and national government -- and perhaps politics in general -- are obsolete, no longer able to perform their assigned functions within our societies?
        Yay! I got promoted to Generation X!
        A new life awaits you in the off world colonies; the chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
          Can it be that our young people are telling us something, that traditional notions of nation-state and national government -- and perhaps politics in general -- are obsolete, no longer able to perform their assigned functions within our societies?
          Sounds like what Trump did........up until about 4 years ago
          "I don't discuss sitting presidents," Mattis tells NPR in an interview. "I believe that you owe a period of quiet."

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
            Or could they be more likely telling us that "public service" is not their idea of a lucrative and rewarding career?

            I'll bet on that interpretation, since the Millenials largely eschew military service, as well.
            Nope, politics is just about making money/power/friends by saying you are making a difference. Much too corrupted. I bet you can start a conversation with any millennial and you'll hear them talk about lobby groups, corruption, big money, etc

            In the larger scheme nation states are certainly outdated, as is nationalism. Patriotism seems to live on only in USA, the two world wars killed it quite well in Europe. I think I read a piece recently that we are moving towards city states/metropolis from nations, though perhaps the author had been reading too much Judge Dredd.

            IMO watching people switch from one party to another or one candidate to another is like watching a drunk trying to go sober by switching vodka to whiskey.
            Last edited by Karri; 01 Feb 17, 12:23.
            Wisdom is personal

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            • #7
              Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
              Based solely on the politicians who get caught, I'd think politics a very lucrative and rewarding career.



              Since Baby-Boomers so eschewed military service that the government felt compelled to institute a draft in order to meet manpower requirements, can not the same accusation be thrown at Millenials' grandparents, as well?

              Though truth be told, were I 18 today, I wouldn't enlist on a bet. Matter of fact, if my kids ever expressed an interest in military service, I'd break their legs.

              While it's far easier to blame today's 20-year old for the condition of the world they're only now entering, I though it more edifying to ask about the condition of the world that we're bequeathing to our children.
              Not if you look at the money, which is far greater in the civilian sector. The president himself only earns $450,000 per annum, while guys like the CEO of Coco Cola earn around 25 million per annum.

              And you're attitude that others should die so that your precious life and freedoms are preserved at no cost to you at all is duly noted. Having been one of those volunteers for twenty years, your view of life is beneath my contempt. You are just another parasitic drone.
              Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Karri View Post
                Nope, politics is just about making money/power/friends by saying you are making a difference. Much too corrupted. I bet you can start a conversation with any millennial and you'll hear them talk about lobby groups, corruption, big money, etc

                In the larger scheme nation states are certainly outdated, as is nationalism. Patriotism seems to live on only in USA, the two world wars killed it quite well in Europe. I think I read a piece recently that we are moving towards city states/metropolis from nations, though perhaps the author had been reading too much Judge Dredd.

                IMO watching people switch from one party to another or one candidate to another is like watching a drunk trying to go sober by switching vodka to whiskey.
                Then you clearly do not understand either people, nation-states or politics, and you certainly have no clue what makes America work.
                Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                  Not if you look at the money, which is far greater in the civilian sector. The president himself only earns $450,000 per annum, while guys like the CEO of Coco Cola earn around 25 million per annum.

                  And you're attitude that others should die so that your precious life and freedoms are preserved at no cost to you at all is duly noted. Having been one of those volunteers for twenty years, your view of life is beneath my contempt. You are just another parasitic drone.
                  I volunteered myself: got lungs full of DU dust, probably some other crap as well. This country, that watches "reality" TV more than it reads the news -- this country, that votes for any two-bit shyster who promises the sun moon and stars and looks good on TV -- this country, that would rather make hay over gay marriage or abortion or Janet Jackson's nipple rather than such "mundane" issues as education or war and peace -- this country, that fell hook line and sinker for Bush's crap about Iraq's WMDs and then turned on him because he couldn't win the war that they all wanted started, so they voted for another greasy politician, Barack Obama; did they really deserve your sacrifice, my sacrifice -- any child's sacrifice?

                  I've lost count of how many funerals I've attended, funerals for guys my age -- for guys younger than me, who fell in Afghanistan and Iraq, and for the life of me, I haven't the first clue about what possible good came from their premature deaths. I want to believe that our political leadership and our citizens are smart enough, wily enough, wise enough, to produce something good and lasting from all of those sacrifices, but the sad reality is is that we're not smart enough or wise enough. All we've done these last fifteen years is waste those young people's lives.

                  So please, tell me all about the good that's come from all of that sacrifice -- as you trundle up to the VA to wait interminably only to be told that the services you seek -- the services that you need -- are not available, so off you crawl to die. Tell me about the noble sacrifices then.

                  Your heart's in the right place, MM, but the reality belies our sentiments. Indeed, we live in a society that will use our nobler sentiments against us, for the crass gain of those lieing b*st*rds in Washington. I'll be damned if I let that happen to my children.
                  I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    There are plenty of senior politicians who did not decide to go into politics until they were well past 30. Your president didn't enter politics until he was well into his 50s.
                    There is ample time for them to choose politics.
                    "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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                    • #11
                      Some thirty years ago I had high hopes for these (then) kids, but the last few years I haven't been that impressed.
                      Trying hard to be the Man, that my Dog believes I am!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Trung Si View Post
                        Some thirty years ago I had high hopes for these (then) kids, but the last few years I haven't been that impressed.

                        Me either, especially not by the pampered little of the "ME! ME": generation, who come with five appendages instead of four - the fifth one being some obnoxious electronic device that apparently replaces their brain.
                        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
                          I volunteered myself: got lungs full of DU dust, probably some other crap as well. This country, that watches "reality" TV more than it reads the news -- this country, that votes for any two-bit shyster who promises the sun moon and stars and looks good on TV -- this country, that would rather make hay over gay marriage or abortion or Janet Jackson's nipple rather than such "mundane" issues as education or war and peace -- this country, that fell hook line and sinker for Bush's crap about Iraq's WMDs and then turned on him because he couldn't win the war that they all wanted started, so they voted for another greasy politician, Barack Obama; did they really deserve your sacrifice, my sacrifice -- any child's sacrifice?

                          I've lost count of how many funerals I've attended, funerals for guys my age -- for guys younger than me, who fell in Afghanistan and Iraq, and for the life of me, I haven't the first clue about what possible good came from their premature deaths. I want to believe that our political leadership and our citizens are smart enough, wily enough, wise enough, to produce something good and lasting from all of those sacrifices, but the sad reality is is that we're not smart enough or wise enough. All we've done these last fifteen years is waste those young people's lives.

                          So please, tell me all about the good that's come from all of that sacrifice -- as you trundle up to the VA to wait interminably only to be told that the services you seek -- the services that you need -- are not available, so off you crawl to die. Tell me about the noble sacrifices then.

                          Your heart's in the right place, MM, but the reality belies our sentiments. Indeed, we live in a society that will use our nobler sentiments against us, for the crass gain of those lieing b*st*rds in Washington. I'll be damned if I let that happen to my children.
                          You really missed the entire point of the exercise.

                          MM is right ; its too bad you don't see what was preserved by your actions, but that is a failing of many. He used 'noble' where I would use 'necessary', but under his crusty, obnoxious exterior is a lot more mean SoB, so I have no idea why.

                          Society as a whole is garbage, whether you were dying at Bull Run or Normandy or the ME. That has never changed, nor been part of the equation.

                          There are still just two types: those who step up, and the pointless drones.
                          Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Pirateship1982 View Post
                            Yay! I got promoted to Generation X!
                            ****, I'm still called a Millennial.

                            Because, you know, being born during the Reagan administration means one has so much in common with someone born during Bush 2.0.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
                              Your heart's in the right place, MM, but the reality belies our sentiments. Indeed, we live in a society that will use our nobler sentiments against us, for the crass gain of those lieing b*st*rds in Washington. I'll be damned if I let that happen to my children.
                              And this is how revolutions are fomented - frustration and anger at a central authority not longer viewed as legitimate or in meeting the needs of the people it claims to represent.

                              One of the major reasons Millenials aren't choosing to go into public service is cynicism. It's not because they like having a terrible government; look at how many youngsters grasped onto Obama's message of "hope and change". The younger generation want to believe the United States can be something more, something worthy of all those dead soldiers we dumped in the ground, even if that promise is as hollow as it sounds.

                              Worse, whenever such a demagogue is shown to be as flawed and selfish as we suspect, it only reinforces the idea that you can't trust the "authorities" to act responsibly.

                              But why should they think they can do anything? Why should they trust the powers that be to be capable of doing when we as citizens are constantly told that we can't do anything? That we can't trust the politicians, or the police, or the newspapers, or our teachers, or our pastors, or our parents?

                              This is a nation increasingly dominated by ennui. Trust in institutions is rock bottom and only getting worse.

                              Why should the youth be optimistic about the world and think they can do anything to make it better when they're given no examples of it, and are laughed at for being idealists if they actually dare to believe?

                              The idea that the world is crap, has always been crap, and will always be crap does not inspire people towards self-sacrifice for the greater good. If anything it just helps reinforce petty selfishness - the idea that "Well, since this ship is sinking anyway, might as well loot the mini-fridge on the way to the life boats."

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