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  • Thank You, Professor Sowell

    Thank You, Professor Sowell
    Michelle Malkin

    I first read Thomas Sowell in college -- no thanks to my college.

    At the majority of America's institutions of "higher learning," reading Thomas Sowell was a subversive act in the early 1990s when I was a student. It remains so today. Why? Because the prolific libertarian economist's vast body of work is a clarion rejection of all the liberal intelligentsia hold dear.

    Among the left's most corrosive ideas is the concept of perpetual and permanent racial victimhood, which social engineers pretend to rectify through federally mandated, taxpayer-subsidized preferential policies. Sowell's groundbreaking academic analyses of these programs in the U.S. and around the world exposed how elites profit mightily at the expense of the alleged beneficiaries of government-coerced affirmative action.

    The grand rhetoric of diversity masks the true intent and actual impact of current racially discriminatory "solutions" to past racial discrimination: solidifying the power of the few over the many. As Sowell put it succinctly in one of the first pieces of his I came across in the journal "The Public Interest":

    "Live people are being sacrificed because of what dead people did."
    ...
    Sowell, who grew up black and poor in Harlem, worked as a delivery man, served in the U.S. Marines, graduated from Harvard Law School, earned his Ph.D. in economics at the University of Chicago, and fully realized the folly of Marxism during a stint as a federal government intern, spurned identity politics collectivism.

    "Fortunately, even during my period of Marxism I had respect for evidence and logic," Sowell told an interviewer in 2004, "so it was only a matter of time before my Marxism began to unravel as I compared what actually happened in history to what was supposed to happen."

    Chromosomes and skin color and partisan loyalty didn't dictate his thinking. He embraced time-tested, transcendent principles grounded in the reality of how things really are -- as opposed to the fantastical imaginings of what he trenchantly called the "Vision of the Anointed." Sowell's book on that subject (published in 1995, the same year the Anointed One, Barack Obama, emerged on the national scene with his fabrication-filled memoir, "Dreams of My Father") thoroughly dismantled the tyranny and tactics of self-described "progressives" whose control-freak narcissism is wrapped in good intentions and false narratives.
    ...
    Sowell's assessments were rooted not in fear or hatred or fanaticism or moral superiority, but in empirical evidence. He judged outcomes, not oration. He didn't make excuses. He made sense.

    "In the anointed we find a whole class of supposedly 'thinking people' who do remarkably little thinking about substance and a great deal of verbal expression," Sowell observed. "In order that this relatively small group of people can believe themselves wiser and nobler than the common herd, we have adopted policies which impose heavy costs on millions of other human beings, not only in taxes, but also in lost jobs, social disintegration, and a loss of personal safety. Seldom have so few cost so much to so many."

    In another giant contribution to contemporary political and policy analysis, Sowell's 1999 tome, "The Quest for Cosmic Justice," addressed the abject failures of those who seek to cure all inequities, inequalities, disparities and ills through government intervention. He summed up his findings thusly:

    1. The impossible is not going to be achieved.

    2. It is a waste of precious resources to try to achieve it.

    3. The devastating costs and social dangers that go with these attempts to achieve the impossible should be taken into account.

    The former leftist playwright David Mamet, in his 2008 manifesto, "Why I Am No Longer a Brain-Dead Liberal," cited his exposure to Sowell, whom he dubbed "our greatest contemporary philosopher," as a critical factor in his conversion. Whether tackling the "bait and switch media," the "organized noisemakers," or the lawless enablers of "social disintegration, Thomas Sowell's dozens of academic books and thousands of newspaper columns have sparked generations of his readers across the political spectrum to think independently and challenge imposed visions.
    ...
    http://townhall.com/columnists/miche...&newsletterad=
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
    “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

  • #2
    Farewell

    Farewell
    Thomas Sowell

    Even the best things come to an end. After enjoying a quarter of a century of writing this column for Creators Syndicate, I have decided to stop. Age 86 is well past the usual retirement age, so the question is not why I am quitting, but why I kept at it so long.

    It was very fulfilling to be able to share my thoughts on the events unfolding around us, and to receive feedback from readers across the country -- even if it was impossible to answer them all.

    Being old-fashioned, I liked to know what the facts were before writing. That required not only a lot of research, it also required keeping up with what was being said in the media.
    ...
    Looking back over the years, as old-timers are apt to do, I see huge changes, both for the better and for the worse.

    In material things, there has been almost unbelievable progress. Most Americans did not have refrigerators back in 1930, when I was born. Television was little more than an experiment, and such things as air-conditioning or air travel were only for the very rich.

    My own family did not have electricity or hot running water, in my early childhood, which was not unusual for blacks in the South in those days.

    It is hard to convey to today's generation the fear that the paralyzing disease of polio inspired, until vaccines put an abrupt end to its long reign of terror in the 1950s.

    Most people living in officially defined poverty in the 21st century have things like cable television, microwave ovens and air-conditioning. Most Americans did not have such things, as late as the 1980s. People whom the intelligentsia continue to call the "have-nots" today have things that the "haves" did not have, just a generation ago.
    ...
    Years of lying Presidents -- Democrat Lyndon Johnson and Republican Richard Nixon, especially -- destroyed not only their own credibility, but the credibility which the office itself once conferred. The loss of that credibility was a loss to the country, not just to the people holding that office in later years.
    ...
    We cannot return to the past, even if we wanted to, but let us hope that we can learn something from the past to make for a better present and future.

    Goodbye and good luck to all.
    ...
    http://townhall.com/columnists/thoma...&newsletterad=

    Although considered libertarian, he also trends toward the conservative side.
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
    “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

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    • #3
      12 Fantastic Thomas Sowell Quotes In Honor Of His Retirement

      12 Fantastic Thomas Sowell Quotes In Honor Of His Retirement
      ...
      1. People who enjoy meetings should not be in charge of anything.

      2. If you have always believed that everyone should play by the same rules and be judged by the same standards, that would have gotten you labeled a radical 60 years ago, a liberal 30 years ago and a racist today.

      3. Immigration laws are the only laws that are discussed in terms of how to help people who break them.

      4. Socialism in general has a record of failure so blatant that only an intellectual could ignore or evade it.

      5. The next time some academics tell you how important diversity is, ask how many Republicans there are in their sociology department.

      6. The most basic question is not what is best, but who shall decide what is best.

      7. The biggest and most deadly 'tax' rate on the poor comes from a loss of various welfare state benefits - food stamps, housing subsidies and the like - if their income goes up.

      8. The real minimum wage is zero.

      9. What 'multiculturalism' boils down to is that you can praise any culture in the world except Western culture - and you cannot blame any culture in the world except Western culture.

      10. In liberal logic, if life is unfair then the answer is to turn more tax money over to politicians, to spend in ways that will increase their chances of getting reelected.

      11. People who have time on their hands will inevitably waste the time of people who have work to do.

      12. Elections should be held on April 16th- the day after we pay our income taxes. That is one of the few things that might discourage politicians from being big spenders.
      ...
      http://townhall.com/tipsheet/christi...&newsletterad=
      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
      “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

      Comment


      • #4
        Farewell to Thomas Sowell, Dean of Conservative Columnists
        BY: BEN SHAPIRO DECEMBER 27, 2016
        In what we can only hope is the final heartbreak of 2016, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution Thomas Sowell announced his retirement from his syndicated column. Sowell isn’t just one of the great thinkers of our time. He’s a genuine voice of decency and truth in a time when screaming and hysterics gain headlines. His voice will be missed every week.
        ...

        Sowell has made sure we learn something. For years, I've named Sowell as the man I'd most love to see as president. That doesn't end just because his column has.

        Here’s a brief list of some of my favorite Sowell books:

        The Quest For Cosmic Justice: Sowell explains where leftist desire to rule springs from, and why they can’t accept the world of reality.

        Basic Economics: Sowell’s seminal work, and one that every high school and college student should read and re-read.

        Wealth, Poverty, and Politics: Sowell breaks down why income inequality occurs. Brilliant and necessary in today’s Bernie Sanders world.

        Black Rednecks and White Liberals: Sowell skewers sacred racial cows with abandon, and brings enlightenment to an area everyone wants to avoid.

        Intellectuals and Race: More from Sowell on race, particularly what obsesses leftists about race.

        A Conflict of Visions: Sowell investigates the deeper roots of political philosophy.

        All of Sowell’s work is worth reading. Check it out now.
        ...
        http://www.dailywire.com/news/11920/...m_campaign=six

        The linked article has click links embedded in the book titles.
        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
        “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

        Comment


        • #5
          He's to economics what Clarence Thomas is to judiciary, and it's sad that neither man will be taken seriously into consideration for their historic and much accomplished achievements by academic world, which leans way too much to the left.

          I'm really disappointed that Clarence Thomas didn't have his rightful place in the museum exhibition that chronicles the history of black people in America. He was barely mentioned in a paragraph with extensive coverage of Anita Hill and her achievements. This is embarrassing to say at least.

          Farewell, Thomas Sowell, you will be missed.

          I have his book on basic economics, it's dry and difficult to get through at times, but I really love how he gets down to basics in an accessible manner that even stupid laymen like me gets it.
          Major James Holden, Georgia Badgers Militia of Rainbow Regiment, American Civil War

          "Aim small, miss small."

          Comment


          • #6
            Wealth, Poverty and Politics
            Walter E. Williams
            EXCERPT;

            Thomas Sowell has just published a revised and enlarged edition of his classic "Wealth, Poverty and Politics." At the very beginning, he quotes Alexander Hamilton, who said, "The wealth of nations depends upon an infinite variety of causes." The book's 16 chapters apply Hamilton's notion to domestic, as well as international, differences in wealth. In both academic and popular literature, it is implicitly assumed that economic equality is natural, automatic and common. Thus, people see wealth inequality as a mystery that must be explained. The fact of the matter is precisely the opposite.

            The ancient Greeks had geometry, philosophy, architecture and literature at a time when Britain was a land of illiterate tribal people living at a primitive level. Of course, by the end of the 19th century, Britain was far ahead of the Greeks and ultimately controlled one-quarter of the planet's land. Such historic reversals have occurred elsewhere. The ancient Chinese were far ahead of Europeans, but by the 19th century, the relative positions of the Chinese and Europeans were reversed. Just these two examples prove that the same people are not always on top.

            Sowell argues there are many factors that explain wealth differences among nations, as well as people within those nations. One of the more obvious explanations is that some people have greater productive capacity than others. Or they seized more of what others produced or had what they produced taken from them. For example, Spain conquered indigenous people in the Western Hemisphere. Spaniards looted 200 tons of gold and 18,000 tons of silver. But despite that wealth transfer, Spain is one of the poorer countries in western Europe today, surpassed economically by countries -- such as Switzerland and Norway -- that never had an empire, so there obviously are many factors at play when it comes to wealth differences.
            ...
            http://townhall.com/columnists/walte...itics-n2263650
            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
            “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

            Comment

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