Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Some job openings in Dallas

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Some job openings in Dallas

    99 Dallas LEOs retiring or resigning.
    DALLAS -- Ninety-nine officers have quit or retired from the Dallas Police Department since October, continuing an exodus that started last year.

    Meanwhile, the department has hired only 30 people for the next academy class in February. Police officials aimed to fill the class with 60 officers, Interim Police Chief David Pughes told council members Monday at a public safety committee meeting.

    The shrinking department is down to 3,252 officers, well below the desired 3,500. The force hopes to hire 449 officers this year to make up for attrition. Council wants police staffing to average three officers per 1,000 residents.

    The department is faced with a troubled police and fire pension fund, low salaries compared with other cities and a rising crime rate.

    Recruitment is lagging behind the rate at which officers are leaving. Last fiscal year, which ended in September, 294 officers left the department, and the department hired 142 officers during the same period.

    The losses have hit every part of the police force, Pughes said.

    There are only 13 motor jockeys, the cops who are likely to patrol school zones with their motorcycles, often writing speeding tickets. Last year, there were 22.

    A property crimes task force was disbanded last month because there weren't enough officers. And other specialty units have been stretched thin.

    "Being down 400 officers, it's spread throughout the entire department," Pughes said.

    The chief said the department is moving resources and officers as needed to ensure there are enough cops to answer 911 calls.

    Meanwhile, the department has been battling an uptick in violent crime this year.

    There have been 160 homicides this year, and overall violent crimes a category that includes aggravated assaults, robberies, murders, sexual assaults are up 12 percent this year over last year.

    Much of the increase has been linked to drugs.
    http://www.officer.com/news/12287002...it-in-10-weeks
    Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
    Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

  • #2
    DPD has been sucking wind for a couple years. Their seniority rate is dropping fast. Their pay is low, they won't join the state-wide pension plan, their last Chief was a liberal, its a sanctuary city, and their UoF rules suck.

    Officers are quitting in such numbers that they have to give more than two weeks notice because HR can't processes them out in time.

    We picked up one of their best homicide investigators. Fort Worth has been snapping up veteran DPD officers with utter abandon.

    It will take years and millions of dollars to get DPD back up to where they were in 2012-14.
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

    Comment


    • #3
      I hope we have seen the high water mark for what amounts to a war in law enforcement, recruitment is down in many cities, and as you point out the salary is an issue as is putting ones life on the line for a unsupportive public.

      PITTSBURGH -- The Pennsylvania State Police are recruiting candidates to fill about 500 job vacancies to bolster the department's contingent of troopers and liquor enforcement officers.

      "There are plenty of openings for those interested," said liquor enforcement officer Glen A. Titler of the Pittsburgh District office. "We've had a shortage for awhile."

      State residents have less than three weeks to apply for the openings, which offer beginning annual salaries of $42,700 for a liquor control officer and $58,962 for a trooper.

      The Bureau of Liquor Enforcement, which is part of the state police, is accepting applications for the next qualification examination to become liquor enforcement officers, while state police are seeking applicants for trooper candidates for the next cadet class. Both deadlines are Dec. 31.

      Cpl. Adam Reed, spokesman for the state police, said its trooper ranks are 477 below the full complement of about 4,700. With seven liquor enforcement trainees set to graduate Wednesday, 23 openings remaining there, Reed said.

      "We also have a cadet class of just over 100 troopers scheduled to graduate Friday, so that will bring that number down too," he said. Reed noted that state police have not been at their full complement "for several years," mostly as a result of retirements.

      Reed said interest among men and women who want to become state troopers has "not really wavered," despite an increase in violence against police.

      "We still have experienced a fairly strong demand ... as witnessed by the over 100 cadets slated to graduate," Reed said.

      Prospective candidates for both positions are required to complete training at the state police academy in Hershey once they pass entrance examinations, Titler said.

      "The Bureau of Liquor Enforcement academy is four months, versus about six months to become a trooper," Titler said.

      http://www.officer.com/news/12287799...0-job-openings
      Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
      Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

      Comment


      • #4
        There's been a nation-wide shortage of qualified police applicants for the last eight years or so.

        Only about 20% of Academy grads remain in the career field at the best of times. I've seen new-hires quit after four days.

        Part of Texas' problem is that TCOLE, the agency tasked with licensing police officers, has spent the last twenty years toughening up the standards for police academies (the staff, not the students). While this was a much-needed improvement for the first ten years, they have gone too far and now there is a real danger that the State isn't licensing officers at a replacement rate.

        The good side is that salaries, benefits, and hiring bonuses have greatly improved; I've averaged 7.5% pay increases for the last five years, for example.

        The bad side is that there are a lot of marginal officers being kept on in areas where low salary makes recruiting tough.

        But every state is having problems. Bobo has been dumping on us for eight years. His hopes of establishing Federal controls over local and State agencies have really had an impact; thankfully they have been thwarted.
        Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
          There's been a nation-wide shortage of qualified police applicants for the last eight years or so.

          Only about 20% of Academy grads remain in the career field at the best of times. I've seen new-hires quit after four days.

          Part of Texas' problem is that TCOLE, the agency tasked with licensing police officers, has spent the last twenty years toughening up the standards for police academies (the staff, not the students). While this was a much-needed improvement for the first ten years, they have gone too far and now there is a real danger that the State isn't licensing officers at a replacement rate.

          The good side is that salaries, benefits, and hiring bonuses have greatly improved; I've averaged 7.5% pay increases for the last five years, for example.

          The bad side is that there are a lot of marginal officers being kept on in areas where low salary makes recruiting tough.

          But every state is having problems. Bobo has been dumping on us for eight years. His hopes of establishing Federal controls over local and State agencies have really had an impact; thankfully they have been thwarted.
          At the agency I work at IT worker are getting recruited from us by outside companies for 5 times what we can pay.
          They can make more than engineers or scientists, and they don't have to get shot at.
          Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
          Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
            At the agency I work at IT worker are getting recruited from us by outside companies for 5 times what we can pay.
            They can make more than engineers or scientists, and they don't have to get shot at.
            Nobody does police work for the pay.

            In the end, we're looking for peoiple who enjoy the violence, risk, and confrontations. That is why 80% of Academy grads wash out. Recruiting and the Academy is all 'help people', 'make a difference', 'good pay, early retirement'.

            And then they hit the street and quickly discover the truth.
            Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

            Comment

            Latest Topics

            Collapse

            Working...
            X