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Carly Fiorina ---> Director of National Intelligence???

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  • Carly Fiorina ---> Director of National Intelligence???

    Report: Carly Fiorina under consideration for intelligence role with Trump

    By KYLE FELDSCHER (@KYLE_FELDSCHER) • 12/12/16

    Former Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina is apparently in the running for director of national intelligence, the New York Times reported Monday.

    Fiorina, who ran Hewlett Packard as CEO in the previous decade, is meeting with President-elect Trump on Monday to discuss the position, according to the Times. Fiorina previously served on the Central Intelligence Agency's External Advisory Board.

    Fiorina was one of the few presidential candidates who was able to get Trump to back down on an attack during the race.

    [...]

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/re...rticle/2609424



    Does anyone else get the sense that Donald Trump is privatizing the Federal government?
    Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

  • #2
    Just what we need:

    http://fortune.com/2015/08/14/carly-...a-president-2/

    In 1999, a dysfunctional HP board committee, filled with its own poisoned politics, hired her with no CEO experience, nor interviews with the full board. Fired in 2005, after six years in office, several leading publications titled her one of the worst technology CEOs of all time. In fact, the stock popped 10% on the news of her firing and closed the day up 7%.
    Furthermore, shareholder wealth at HP was sliced 52% under her reign against the S&P, which was down only 15% in that bearish period. She modeled the old joke of “making it up in the volume.”
    Way to go, 'privatize' the Feds with a failed business executive. I thought PE Trump liked winners?
    “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
    “To talk of many things:
    Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
    Of cabbages—and kings—
    And why the sea is boiling hot—
    And whether pigs have wings.”
    ― Lewis Carroll

    Comment


    • #3
      Oh in typical US fashion she was highly rewarded for being a failure.

      From the link above.

      Despite such carnage, Fiorina pocketed over $100 million in compensation for her short reign—including a $65 million signing bonus and a $21 million severance. I have studied comebacks from adversity, but she’s not shown the required contrition nor earned the needed exoneration, and she’s not served as a CEO since.
      “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
      “To talk of many things:
      Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
      Of cabbages—and kings—
      And why the sea is boiling hot—
      And whether pigs have wings.”
      ― Lewis Carroll

      Comment


      • #4
        In the debates she had the charisma of an android and Trump attacked her for failing HP.
        Zhitomir-Berdichev, West of Kiev: 24 Dec 1943-31 Jan 1944
        Stalin's Favorite: The Combat History of the 2nd Guards Tank Army
        Barbarossa Derailed I & II
        Battle of Kalinin October 1941

        Comment


        • #5
          Author of the hit-piece on Fiorina: Professor Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, Yale School of Management... an Ivy League academic.

          Did Ms. Fiorina rise too quickly up the corporate ladder? Maybe.
          Fiorina rose quickly at AT&T, becoming senior vice president for its hardware and systems division, then helping launch its spinoff, Lucent Technologies. By 1998, she’d been named by Fortune as the most powerful woman in business and the next year was tapped as Hewlett-Packard’s chief executive officer—the first woman to run a Fortune 50 company. But then came voluntary pay cuts at HP, followed by layoffs of 30,000 people. Amid a controversial merger with computer maker Compaq in 2002, HP’s stock plummeted, and the big profits she’d so convincingly promised never arrived. In 2005 the board fired her, and sent her off with a $21 million severance package.

          https://www.bloomberg.com/politics/f...est-2016-asset

          CEO's generally have large severance packages built into their contracts.

          The board fired her for the HP-Compaq merger, which was opposed by the "son of HP co-founder Bill Hewlett." Initially, the much larger HP-Compaq appeared to be in trouble, as did much of the rest of the tech sector in the aftermath of the "dot-com" bust.

          As it turned out, the HP-Compaq merger is the main reason HPQ outperformed almost everyone else from 2002-2008...
          The Merger That Worked: Compaq and Hewlett-Packard

          04/09/2008

          Ben Rosen
          benrosen.com

          In the old days, the conventional wisdom on Wall St. was that mergers were exciting, they created value, they just were good. And the bigger the merger, the better.

          In recent years, however, mergers, particularly among large-cap companies, have not been looked upon so favorably. And the results mostly bear out this skepticism.

          [...]

          Most of these ill-fated mergers were the results of misguided intentions.

          [...]

          But of all the megadeals in the last 10 years that have engendered opprobrium, few have rivaled in negative views the combination of Hewlett-Packard and Compaq Computer. Announced the week before 9/11, the HP-Compaq merger was met with almost universal skepticism and cynicism. And well after the merger was consummated in mid-2002, the doubts continued.

          Today, the merger is nearly six years old. And, surprise, surprise — it’s turned out to be a sensational combination, whether measured by market share, market leadership or increased shareholder value.

          Before going further, I should disclose that from shortly after its founding in 1982 until the year 2000, I was non-executive chairman of Compaq Computer. Retiring a year before the HP merger was announced and two years before it became effective, I had neither knowledge of nor participation in the deal. Another disclosure — I currently own no stock in Hewlett-Packard. I’m simply an interested (analytically, not financially) observer.

          [...]

          Leading the fight against the merger was a son of HP co-founder Bill Hewlett. This sometime cellist, Walter Hewlett, sat on the Hewlett-Packard board and also on the Hewlett-Packard Foundation board. He controlled a lot of stock. And he became the leader of the opposition to the merger.

          [...]

          Did Hewlett-Packard and Compaq make a colossal mistake? Was this a dumb deal? Or are all these commentators be wrong?

          Well, for a while, these Cassandras looked pretty good. After the companies merged, the integration and execution went poorly. Many of the best and brightest from Compaq left, some voluntarily, some not.

          CEO Carly Fiorina was the architect of the merger and its champion. She made it happen despite fierce opposition from the Hewlett and Packard family members, their foundations, and from other large shareholders. But while she did the deal, she simply did not have the skills to manage one of the world’s largest technology companies. For almost three years, the company failed to realize the potential of the combined companies. In early 2005, criticism of the company and the merger reached shrill proportions.

          [...]

          Nothing illustrates the success of the merger better than the chart below. It shows the stock price changes of Dell, IBM and Hewlett since the May 3, 2002, HP-Compaq merger. Dell Computer, once the darling of the business press and industry analysts, has seen its stock price drop 20%. The S&P 500 has risen 28% and IBM 42%. Meanwhile, the once-maligned Hewlett-Packard has seen its stock price soar 163%! So much for a lousy merger.



          Where did the pundits go wrong? Well, first of all, they’re pundits. “Those who can, do; those who can’t, opine.” Second, they typically apply conventional wisdom (e.g., all big mergers are bad) rather than analytically looking at whether there is a real fit between the two merging companies. And finally, for the initial three years that the merged company was managed by Fiorina and was struggling, the criticism focused on the “folly” of the merger. It’s now clear to all, even to pundits, that the merger wasn’t the problem; it was the management. All Hewlett-Packard needed was strong management in order to realize the latent potential of the merged company.

          [...]



          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ben-ro...o_b_95873.html

          Attached Files
          Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

          Comment


          • #6
            Stock went down under performing the marker, she was fired.

            Yes CEO's in the US often are almost always get rewarded for failure. Worst part of our business model that I can thing of.
            “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
            “To talk of many things:
            Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
            Of cabbages—and kings—
            And why the sea is boiling hot—
            And whether pigs have wings.”
            ― Lewis Carroll

            Comment


            • #7
              "She hasn’t done a good job in, you could call it, the private sector. The companies, take a look at the record," "The top man at Yale Law School came out, Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, with just a raging report. She’s one of the worst executives in his memory in history running the company."
              “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
              “To talk of many things:
              Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
              Of cabbages—and kings—
              And why the sea is boiling hot—
              And whether pigs have wings.”
              ― Lewis Carroll

              Comment


              • #8
                A military type person should get the Director of national intelligence job....not Mrs Fiorina. I find Fiorina can be used elsewhere.
                Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
                Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

                George S Patton

                Comment


                • #9
                  “Hewlett-Packard was a disaster. Lucent, the company she was at before Hewlett-Packard, was a disaster. These were two disastrous reigns,”
                  “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
                  “To talk of many things:
                  Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
                  Of cabbages—and kings—
                  And why the sea is boiling hot—
                  And whether pigs have wings.”
                  ― Lewis Carroll

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    "She did a terrible job at Hewlett-Packard. She did a terrible job at Lucent. I mean, those companies are just a disaster and she destroyed Hewlett-Packard," "I mean, she's been terrible."
                    “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
                    “To talk of many things:
                    Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
                    Of cabbages—and kings—
                    And why the sea is boiling hot—
                    And whether pigs have wings.”
                    ― Lewis Carroll

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      "She was winning until they found out how bad she did in business and, frankly, she got wiped out and lost in a landslide. So I don't see it as being something that's going to last because her performance has been terrible,"
                      “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
                      “To talk of many things:
                      Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
                      Of cabbages—and kings—
                      And why the sea is boiling hot—
                      And whether pigs have wings.”
                      ― Lewis Carroll

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Combat Engineer View Post
                        “Hewlett-Packard was a disaster. Lucent, the company she was at before Hewlett-Packard, was a disaster. These were two disastrous reigns,”

                        (Data laughing at you and your college professor.)



                        Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by The Doctor View Post

                          (Data laughing at you and your college professor.)
                          (Data laughing at you and your college professor.)


                          No Data is laughing at PE Trump....whoops. All of those quotes are from him.

                          “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
                          “To talk of many things:
                          Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
                          Of cabbages—and kings—
                          And why the sea is boiling hot—
                          And whether pigs have wings.”
                          ― Lewis Carroll

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Combat Engineer View Post
                            (Data laughing at you and your college professor.)


                            No Data is laughing at PE Trump....whoops. All of those quotes are from him.

                            Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Worst computer I ever owned was a hp. They sold a laptop with a known defective motherboard. Then tried to charge people for the fix.

                              Rip off company, that's why they suck. Don't ever buy their crappy products...
                              Last edited by Bwaha; 13 Dec 16, 15:15.
                              Credo quia absurdum.


                              Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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