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  • #31
    Btw when I voted I noticed everyone was doing paper ballots. (guess they wanted their vote untampered with...) I asked one of the workers and she said they had zero people use it so far. (Said it was a pita to use.)
    Credo quia absurdum.


    Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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    • #32
      Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
      Have you ever heard of an elector, in our era, buck his state's law?
      Here is some info.

      http://www.fairvote.org/faithless_electors

      Back through 1968:

      2004 - Anonymous (Democrat, Minnesota)
      An unknown elector from Minnesota, pledged to vote for Democrat John Kerry, cast a presidential vote instead for Kerry’s running mate John Edwards (the elector also cast his or her vice presidential vote for Edwards). One Minnesota elector, who believed the Edwards vote must have been a mistake, said, "I'm certainly glad the Electoral College isn't separated by one vote."

      2000 - Barbara Lett-Simmons (Democrat, District of Columbia)
      Barbara Lett-Simmons, a Democratic elector from the District of Columbia, did not cast her vote in order to protest the lack of congressional representation for Washington, DC. Lett-Simmons was the first elector to abstain from voting since 1832. Her abstention did not affect the outcome of the election.

      1988 - Margaret Leach (Democrat, West Virginia)
      Margaret Leach, a nurse from Huntington, WV, was pledged to the Democratic Party. During the Electoral College process, Leach learned that members of the Electoral College were not required to vote for the candidates to whom they were pledged, whereupon she decided to draw more attention to the situation by switching her votes for president and vice president. She cast her presidential vote for Lloyd Bentsen, the Democratic Vice Presidential candidate, and cast her vice presidential vote for Michael Dukakis, the Democratic presidential candidate.

      Leach tried to get other electors to join her, but hers remained the only unexpected vote.

      1976 - Mike Padden (Republican, Washington)
      Mike Padden, a lawyer from Spokane, WA, was pledged to vote for Gerald Ford, the 1976 Republican candidate for president. Instead Padden voted for Ronald Reagan, who had run in the Republican primary and lost. For vice president he voted for Robert Dole, Gerald Ford's running mate.

      1972 - Roger L. MacBride (Republican, Virginia)
      Roger L. MacBride was pledged to the Republican party of Virginia. However, in the 1972 election, MacBride did not cast his electoral vote for Richard Nixon, the Republican presidential candidate, but for John Hospers, the Libertarian presidential candidate.

      He also cast his vice presidential vote for Toni Nathan, the Libertarian vice presidential candidate, (making Nathan the first woman to receive an electoral vote). MacBride ran as the Libertarian candidate for president in the next election but did not receive any electoral votes.

      1968 - Dr. Lloyd W. Bailey (Republican, North Carolina)
      Dr. Lloyd W. Bailey was an elector for the Republican Party of North Carolina. He did not vote for Richard Nixon however, but for George Wallace, the presidential candidate for the American Independence Party. (Wallace received a total of 46 electoral votes).

      Bailey claimed that Nixon had done some things that displeased him (like appointing Henry Kissinger and Daniel Moynihan) and so he decided not to vote for him. He also protested that he had never signed a pledge promising to vote for any particular candidate and that his vote for Wallace was justified because Wallace was the winner in Bailey’s district.

      Bailey later admitted at a Senate hearing that he would have voted for Richard Nixon if his vote would have altered the outcome of the election.
      “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
      “To talk of many things:
      Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
      Of cabbages—and kings—
      And why the sea is boiling hot—
      And whether pigs have wings.”
      ― Lewis Carroll

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Combat Engineer View Post
        Interesting. It appears that 4 Electors are threatening to be 'unfaithful electors'. Two from each party.

        http://time.com/4560682/faithless-electors/
        Apparently there have been five "unfaithful electors" in my lifetime. Who knew.
        I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
          Apparently there have been "unfaithful electors" in my lifetime. Who knew.
          Look up....

          “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
          “To talk of many things:
          Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
          Of cabbages—and kings—
          And why the sea is boiling hot—
          And whether pigs have wings.”
          ― Lewis Carroll

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Combat Engineer View Post
            Interesting. It appears that 4 Electors are threatening to be 'unfaithful electors'. Two from each party.

            http://time.com/4560682/faithless-electors/
            OK, so in a close race, this is the sort of thing that could get the lawyers involved.

            These 'electors' seem an unneccasry middleman, standing between the citizen voter and the democratic result.
            Ne Obliviscaris, Sans Peur

            Comment


            • #36
              What would happen if Hillary won, but a dozen or more electors voted for Sanders?
              Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Escape2Victory View Post
                OK, so in a close race, this is the sort of thing that could get the lawyers involved.

                These 'electors' seem an unneccasry middleman, standing between the citizen voter and the democratic result.
                Our Founding Fathers did not trust direct democracy. They were afraid that the new republic's political process would devolve into a glorified popularity contest, with the laurels going to the loudest sht-talker. They were especially moved by Thucydides' tales of Athens' failures, particularly the archons Cleon and Alcibiades. In their view, empowering smaller bodies, like the Senate and the Electoral College at the expense of the electorate at large, would serve to prevent those excesses of direct democracy.

                That was the theory, in any case. The Senate has, at times, proven its value. The same can not, as far as I'm aware, be said of the Electoral College.
                I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

                Comment


                • #38
                  I voted for Mrs Clinton for potus. As a way of making a statement but also paying homage to the great Americans who built the country we live in today I voted in the following on the down ballots,

                  Andrew Jackson, FDR, Stonewall Jackson and Teddy Roosevelt.
                  Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
                  Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

                  George S Patton

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
                    Our Founding Fathers did not trust direct democracy. They were afraid that the new republic's political process would devolve into a glorified popularity contest, with the laurels going to the loudest sht-talker. They were especially moved by Thucydides' tales of Athens' failures, particularly the archons Cleon and Alcibiades. In their view, empowering smaller bodies, like the Senate and the Electoral College at the expense of the electorate at large, would serve to prevent those excesses of direct democracy.

                    That was the theory, in any case. The Senate has, at times, proven its value. The same can not, as far as I'm aware, be said of the Electoral College.
                    I bet no one thought we would get to Thucydides and Alcibiades on this thread. I'm glad we did though. Brings to mind Tides of War, which was an enjoyable fictional account of the latter.
                    Ne Obliviscaris, Sans Peur

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Escape2Victory View Post
                      I bet no one thought we would get to Thucydides and Alcibiades on this thread. I'm glad we did though. Brings to mind Tides of War, which was an enjoyable fictional account of the latter.
                      "There's nothing new under the sun . . . . " From where I sit, Thucydides should be mandatory reading in all schools, that's how repetitive politics has been for all of settled history.
                      I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Escape2Victory View Post
                        I bet no one thought we would get to Thucydides and Alcibiades on this thread. I'm glad we did though. Brings to mind Tides of War, which was an enjoyable fictional account of the latter.
                        In reply to an earlier question/comment of yours. The electors for each candidate are picked by each state's political party. So the Republicans pick their electors, the Democrats pick their electors. I would assume that each Presidential candidate would have some input on who is chosen. Usually the people chosen are party loyalists who are not going to vote for the other party's guy/girl. I always make a point to look at the electors on the ballot...they are listed below the candidate in my state. I didn't recognize any of the Republican electors. But I did recognize the names of two the the Democrat electors. One is a former State AG, the other is the wife of a former State Governor.

                        In most states, 29, the electors are legally obligated to vote the way the popular vote goes.

                        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:F...tor_states.svg

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                        • #42
                          Well after a three and a half hour drive, I'm finally back in Houston to vote. And traffic is still stupid.

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                          • #43
                            ^ It's Houston: what did you expect?

                            Rimshot
                            I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Daemon of Decay View Post
                              Well after a three and a half hour drive, I'm finally back in Houston to vote. And traffic is still stupid.
                              That's what you get for living in Baja Oklahoma.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Well voting was simple, though traffic was a pain. Combining 5 o'clock traffic with election time deadlines is not a fun combination.

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