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  • Denial of Service Attack

    Anyone else get hit by the giant DDOS attacks this weekend? Net stories are mostly about targeted websites, but apparently AT&T (my provider) has been hit as well with massive outages throughout the U.S., but mostly east of the Mississippi. Looks like Indianapolis got hit pretty hard according to the latest outage maps.

    Here the i-net became iffy Thursday night. We figured it was the weather (rain and wind), but it would go on for a few hours, then quit, back on. (Outsourced) customer service was useless (yes, I am speaking to you (Indian) "Kevin"). Next guy finally got an appointment with a lineman who came out this morning (Saturday), when it was working. Made some changes. Everything seem to be working, but went out as he walked out the door. More fiddling. Was working, then about an hour after he left was down. Called him (he left a card so as not have to go through AT&T Customer "Service"), and he came back. Swapped the modem, but had to leave for his next appointment (45 minutes drive away). While later went down again. Called back, and he was having the exact same problem with the other customer. Certainly was of the opinion that it was DDOS. Inet has been come and go since then. Currently up.

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/31338...e-offline.html

    Tuebor

  • #2
    With millions of poorly protected set top devices, smart TVs, surveillance systems, and compromised computers ever growing in numbers, all of which are connected to the Internet, one can expect such attacks to start growing in number and severity.

    The only protection from such attacks, better and up to date security to modems and routers in order to prevent their takeover by hackers. That becomes the ultimate responsibility of the owners of those devices.
    “Breaking News,”

    “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

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    • #3
      No problems with AT&T up here.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by SRV Ron View Post
        With millions of poorly protected set top devices, smart TVs, surveillance systems, and compromised computers ever growing in numbers, all of which are connected to the Internet, one can expect such attacks to start growing in number and severity.

        The only protection from such attacks, better and up to date security to modems and routers in order to prevent their takeover by hackers. That becomes the ultimate responsibility of the owners of those devices.
        It would appear that this is a somewhat over simplistic view and the problem is in the design of some devices that have built in passwords that cannot be changed easily or at all. In such cases it is the manufacturers responsibility. Kit is now available that allows hackers to scan the Internet automatically seeking poorly protected devices to take over.

        http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-37750798
        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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        • #5
          Actually, a major part of the problem lies in IoT hardware/firmware design. Predominantly, most of the bad designs come from China and the main issue is that "simply" changing passwords alone does not necessarily mean that your device is "secured" (although it's a good place to start). In many of these systems, the hardwares' firmware itself has builtin code which allows Telnet/SSL access into the systems which allows bypassing the more ubiquitous Web page access. Most people have no idea how to use Telnet/SSL, much less what it is, so it's "nonexistent" to them.

          The problem is that on these same devices, there's no way to turn off Telnet/SSL unlike on PCs or larger systems. So the backdoor sits there waiting to be exploited. To add additional annoyance, most of these platforms use a truncated version of Linux (free to use, of course) and, of late, there have been many Linux kernel-level issues found which go back as far as Linux 3.6 or even farther. The latest nasty thing for Linux is "DirtyCow" which basically allows any user to become "root" user. In essence, that person can control every aspect of the system. And because of bad design, it is difficult to fix these problem devices by updating or even replacing the offending bit.

          Cheers.
          Last edited by boomer400; 24 Oct 16, 13:36.

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          • #6
            No problems out here in Colorado that I know of.
            Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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