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  • Iran Travel Warning

    The Department of State warns U.S. citizens of the risks of travel to Iran. This replaces the Travel Warning for Iran dated March 14, 2016, to reiterate and highlight the risk of arrest and detention of U.S. citizens, particularly dual national Iranian-Americans. Foreigners, in particular dual nationals of Iran and Western countries including the United States, continue to be detained or prevented from leaving Iran. U.S. citizens traveling to Iran should very carefully weigh the risks of travel and consider postponing their travel. U.S. citizens residing in Iran should closely follow media reports, monitor local conditions, and evaluate the risks of remaining in the country.

    Iranian authorities continue to unjustly detain and imprison U.S. citizens, particularly Iranian-Americans, including students, journalists, business travelers, and academics, on charges including espionage and posing a threat to national security. Iranian authorities have also prevented the departure, in some cases for months, of a number of Iranian-American citizens who traveled to Iran for personal or professional reasons. U.S. citizens traveling to Iran should very carefully weigh the risks of travel and consider postponing their travel. U.S. citizens residing in Iran should closely follow media reports, monitor local conditions, and evaluate the risks of remaining in the country.
    The U.S. government does not have diplomatic or consular relations with the Islamic Republic of Iran and therefore cannot provide protection or routine consular services to U.S. citizens in Iran. The Swiss government, acting through its Embassy in Tehran, serves as protecting power for U.S. interests in Iran.The range of consular services provided by the Foreign Interests Section at the Swiss Embassy is limited and may require significantly more processing time than at U.S. embassies or consulates.
    The Iranian government does not recognize dual citizenship and will not allow the Swiss to provide protective services for U.S. citizens who are also Iranian nationals. The Iranian authorities make the determination of a dual nationalís Iranian citizenship without regard to the dual nationalís personal wishes. Consular access to detained U.S. citizens without dual nationality is often denied as well.
    The Iranian government continues to repress some minority religious and ethnic groups, including Christians, Baha'i, Arabs, Kurds, Azeris, and others. Consequently, some areas within the country where these minorities reside, including the Baluchistan border area near Pakistan and Afghanistan, the Kurdish northwest of the country, and areas near the Iraqi border, remain unsafe. Iranian authorities have detained and harassed U.S. citizens, particularly those of Iranian origin. Former Muslims who have converted to other religions, religious activists, and persons who encourage Muslims to convert are subject to arrest and prosecution.
    The U.S. government is concerned about the risks to civil aircraft operating into, out of, within, or over Iran due to hazards from military activity associated with the conflicts in Iraq and Syria. The FAA has advised U.S. civil aviation to exercise caution when flying into, out of, within, or over the airspace over Iran. For further background information regarding FAA flight prohibitions and advisories for U.S. civil aviation, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administrationís Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.
    The U.S. governmentís ability to assist U.S. citizens in Iran in the event of an emergency is extremely limited. U.S. citizens in Iran should ensure that they have updated documentation at all times and make their own plans in the event of an emergency. For more information, see "What the Department of State Can and Can't Do in a Crisis" at the Department's website.

    https://travel.state.gov/content/pas...l-warning.html

    Well so much for the lies about that being a good place to visit...
    Credo quia absurdum.


    Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

  • #2
    Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
    The Department of State warns U.S. citizens of the risks of travel to Iran. This replaces the Travel Warning for Iran dated March 14, 2016, to reiterate and highlight the risk of arrest and detention of U.S. citizens, particularly dual national Iranian-Americans. Foreigners, in particular dual nationals of Iran and Western countries including the United States, continue to be detained or prevented from leaving Iran. U.S. citizens traveling to Iran should very carefully weigh the risks of travel and consider postponing their travel. U.S. citizens residing in Iran should closely follow media reports, monitor local conditions, and evaluate the risks of remaining in the country.

    Iranian authorities continue to unjustly detain and imprison U.S. citizens, particularly Iranian-Americans, including students, journalists, business travelers, and academics, on charges including espionage and posing a threat to national security. Iranian authorities have also prevented the departure, in some cases for months, of a number of Iranian-American citizens who traveled to Iran for personal or professional reasons. U.S. citizens traveling to Iran should very carefully weigh the risks of travel and consider postponing their travel. U.S. citizens residing in Iran should closely follow media reports, monitor local conditions, and evaluate the risks of remaining in the country.
    The U.S. government does not have diplomatic or consular relations with the Islamic Republic of Iran and therefore cannot provide protection or routine consular services to U.S. citizens in Iran. The Swiss government, acting through its Embassy in Tehran, serves as protecting power for U.S. interests in Iran.The range of consular services provided by the Foreign Interests Section at the Swiss Embassy is limited and may require significantly more processing time than at U.S. embassies or consulates.
    The Iranian government does not recognize dual citizenship and will not allow the Swiss to provide protective services for U.S. citizens who are also Iranian nationals. The Iranian authorities make the determination of a dual nationalís Iranian citizenship without regard to the dual nationalís personal wishes. Consular access to detained U.S. citizens without dual nationality is often denied as well.
    The Iranian government continues to repress some minority religious and ethnic groups, including Christians, Baha'i, Arabs, Kurds, Azeris, and others. Consequently, some areas within the country where these minorities reside, including the Baluchistan border area near Pakistan and Afghanistan, the Kurdish northwest of the country, and areas near the Iraqi border, remain unsafe. Iranian authorities have detained and harassed U.S. citizens, particularly those of Iranian origin. Former Muslims who have converted to other religions, religious activists, and persons who encourage Muslims to convert are subject to arrest and prosecution.
    The U.S. government is concerned about the risks to civil aircraft operating into, out of, within, or over Iran due to hazards from military activity associated with the conflicts in Iraq and Syria. The FAA has advised U.S. civil aviation to exercise caution when flying into, out of, within, or over the airspace over Iran. For further background information regarding FAA flight prohibitions and advisories for U.S. civil aviation, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administrationís Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.
    The U.S. governmentís ability to assist U.S. citizens in Iran in the event of an emergency is extremely limited. U.S. citizens in Iran should ensure that they have updated documentation at all times and make their own plans in the event of an emergency. For more information, see "What the Department of State Can and Can't Do in a Crisis" at the Department's website.

    https://travel.state.gov/content/pas...l-warning.html

    Well so much for the lies about that being a good place to visit...
    Hasn't been since about 1979.
    Just goes to show what happens when you start to pay ransom.
    Thought we learned this back in Jefferson's Presidency with the Barbary Pirates?
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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    • #3
      This requires a really big...

      Comment


      • #4
        Two of my children's godparents have been to Iran in the last year. They thoroughly enjoyed themselves, although the Godmother didn't like to cover her hair, the one feature she really likes about herself.

        What is interesting about Iran is that it is a young in population age country, due to its various wars etc, especially among the men. Like all teenagers they naturally rebel.

        Iran might change from the inside out. We can only hope this might be true.
        How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
        Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Nick the Noodle View Post
          ...

          Iran might change from the inside out. We can only hope this might be true.
          They came close in 2009, but with Zero outside support, they were just meat on the table for the Rev Guards and the Hamas murderers that were flown into Iran by the mullahs for the express purpose of slaughtering Iranian citizens.

          The common people have always wanted to be rid of the Ayatollahs, but as long as the rest of the world refuses to help them in any way, it will never happen.
          Just like in North Korea, the Govt of Iran's best pal and role-model.
          "Why is the Rum gone?"

          -Captain Jack

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Nick the Noodle View Post
            Two of my children's godparents have been to Iran in the last year. They thoroughly enjoyed themselves, although the Godmother didn't like to cover her hair, the one feature she really likes about herself.

            What is interesting about Iran is that it is a young in population age country, due to its various wars etc, especially among the men. Like all teenagers they naturally rebel.

            Iran might change from the inside out. We can only hope this might be true.
            Other then women having to cover their hair, and some of the religious leaders shouting death to America...Iran is doing ok. Russia, a respected nation and ally of WW2..works more with Iran then the USA works with Iran. Now I do believe the USA is a more free nation when compared to Iran. Still in the USAthere are Southern Evangelical Christians who travel to certain Christian majority countries in Africa and support the lifetime imprisonment for gays.In Iran gays are up for the death penalty, in some Christian majority countries in Africa gays can get life in prison...both are a bleak outlook and changes should be made.

            But the question is to what extent should the USA force other nations to change their laws. I wonder what gun loving GOP conservatives think about this one? The thing is many Iranians and Saudis come to the USA and respect our laws whether they like then or not. Now if I went to Iran or Saudi Arabia I would respect their laws even If I disagree with them.
            Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
            Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

            George S Patton

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            • #7
              Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
              They came close in 2009, but with Zero outside support, they were just meat on the table for the Rev Guards and the Hamas murderers that were flown into Iran by the mullahs for the express purpose of slaughtering Iranian citizens.

              The common people have always wanted to be rid of the Ayatollahs, but as long as the rest of the world refuses to help them in any way, it will never happen.
              Just like in North Korea, the Govt of Iran's best pal and role-model.
              In 2009 what came close? There was a disputed election,

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irania...election,_2009

              But are you saying the Ayatollah was going to be overthrown had Mousavi won?

              In any event I was watching an interview with Israeli and Palestinian guests, all agreed that it would be beneficial for all parties involved in Israeli Palestine to come to the table.
              Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
              Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

              George S Patton

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              • #8
                If it takes a travel warning to keep one from travelling to Iran, I say let them go. Better for them to get the Darwin Award over there than over here.
                ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

                BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

                BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
                  ...The Department of State warns U.S. citizens of the risks of travel to Iran...
                  I was not intending to travel in that direction.

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                  • #10
                    Iran Travel Warnings!
                    Trying hard to be the Man, that my Dog believes I am!

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