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  • Privately owned prisons inefficient

    "[Private prisons] compare poorly to our own Bureau facilities," Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates wrote in a memo to US officials. "They simply do not provide the same level of correctional services, programs, and resources; they do not save substantially on costs ... they do not maintain the same level of safety and security."
    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-37133879
    "Religion can never reform mankind because religion is slavery"
    Robert G. Ingersoll 1833-1899

  • #2
    Very true, and nothing new at all, BTW. Private prisons have to show a profit, but their income is set by the employer they work for. The only way to cut costs and maintain a profit, therefore, is to cut back on staffing, pay minimum wages, cut programs and reduce all other expenditures to the minimum necessary.

    Colorado has had a number of failed experiments with private prisons and the answer is always the same - doing it yourself is cheaper than paying someone else to do it for you, especially in the specialized world of prison systems.

    The Federal government has has the same failures, notably when they used contract facilities to operate the INS detention centers in Denver and elsewhere. Poor wages, zero benefits, cut-rate medical care and a totally unsatisfactory outcome all around.

    I worked for six years at the Denver INS central facility, and it was a joke, and the company - Wackenhutt - ended up being taken over by another corporation.

    Incidentally, this applies to all government work conducted by contractors, especially when our military forces are involved.
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
      Very true, and nothing new at all, BTW. Private prisons have to show a profit, but their income is set by the employer they work for. The only way to cut costs and maintain a profit, therefore, is to cut back on staffing, pay minimum wages, cut programs and reduce all other expenditures to the minimum necessary.

      Colorado has had a number of failed experiments with private prisons and the answer is always the same - doing it yourself is cheaper than paying someone else to do it for you, especially in the specialized world of prison systems.

      The Federal government has has the same failures, notably when they used contract facilities to operate the INS detention centers in Denver and elsewhere. Poor wages, zero benefits, cut-rate medical care and a totally unsatisfactory outcome all around.

      I worked for six years at the Denver INS central facility, and it was a joke, and the company - Wackenhutt - ended up being taken over by another corporation.

      Incidentally, this applies to all government work conducted by contractors, especially when our military forces are involved.
      ^^^^^^^
      100% correct!
      Trying hard to be the Man, that my Dog believes I am!

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      • #4
        For profit prisons, what could possibly go wrong?

        State takeover of troubled Idaho private prison now under way
        As of this week, Idaho's largest prison is now under state control, as Idaho takes it over from the private prison firm Corrections Corp. of America, which built and operated the lockup south of Boise for the state throughout its troubled 14-year history. "To reflect the change in status from private to state operations, the name of the facility becomes the Idaho State Correctional Center (ISCC)," the state Department of Corrections announced. Click below for a report from AP reporter Kimberlee Kruesi, who notes that the takeover marks the end of a big experiment with privatizing Idaho's public prisons despite multiple attempts from Gov. Butch Otter to push for more privatization. In 2008, Otter unsuccessfully pitched legislation that would allow private companies to build and operate prisons in Idaho and import out-of-state inmates. Then in 2009, Otter suggested privatizing the 500-bed, state-run Idaho Correctional Institution-Orofino while also requesting to cut the state correctional department's budget by more than $11 million, or 12 percent.

        The Department of Corrections announced that visitation at the ISCC will be canceled this week from Monday through Thursday, and will resume on Friday, "to facilitate a smooth transition."
        http://www.spokesman.com/blogs/boise...now-under-way/
        Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
        Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

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        • #5
          FBI takes over investigation of Idaho prison nicknamed ‘Gladiator School’
          BOISE, Idaho — The FBI has launched a criminal investigation into private prison company Corrections Corporation of America which ran what Idaho inmates called "Gladiator School" because of a violent reputation they say understaffing helped create.

          The Nashville, Tenn.-based CCA has operated Idaho's largest prison for more than a decade, but last year, CCA officials acknowledged it had understaffed the Idaho Correctional Center by thousands of hours in violation of the state contract. CCA also said employees falsified reports to cover up the vacancies. The announcement came after an Associated Press investigation showed CCA sometimes listed guards as working 48 hours straight to meet minimum staffing requirements.
          http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nati...icle-1.1714357
          Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
          Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

          Comment


          • #6
            We have CCA prisons here in Oklahoma. They claim to make a profit, but the only way they actually make a profit is because the state is responsible for the medical care of the prisoners. The state even has to pay for the medical care of prisoners that didn't originate in Oklahoma. Make CCA pay for the medical of all prisoners in their care and they would be losing money.

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            • #7
              All prisons are inefficient. This rises as the level of security necessary rises. CCA, and other private prison companies only do operations taking lower risk inmates.
              That is probably not worth the cost especially when state run operations can combine various levels of security prisons into "complexes" and operate these as a group.

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              • #8
                There are certain things that Private Enterprise has no business getting into the business of.

                Prisons.
                Tax Collection.
                Fighting Wars.
                A bank that pretends to be part of the Government.... yeah, stuff like that.
                "Why is the Rum gone?"

                -Captain Jack

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
                  There are certain things that Private Enterprise has no business getting into the business of.

                  Prisons.
                  Tax Collection.
                  Fighting Wars.
                  A bank that pretends to be part of the Government.... yeah, stuff like that.
                  And yet over and over again, our dead-brained government leaders turn to them to do just those kinds of jobs.

                  Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
                    There are certain things that Private Enterprise has no business getting into the business of.

                    Prisons.
                    Tax Collection.
                    Fighting Wars.
                    A bank that pretends to be part of the Government.... yeah, stuff like that.
                    As opposed to government:

                    Everything!

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                    • #11
                      The problem with privately owned prisons is there's little competition, and if there is some, they will have to cut down on the pricing in order to win the bidding for contracts with local or state governments. There's not much room for innovation.

                      This is one of few areas where the state must take over.
                      Major James Holden, Georgia Badgers Militia of Rainbow Regiment, American Civil War

                      "Aim small, miss small."

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                      • #12
                        You know something is fundamentally wrong with something when Exo, MMM, TAG & myself are all in agreement. Administering punishment should be the province of the Government.

                        Sadly Australia is doing something it does all too often - jumping on to a bad idea from the US at about the time the US is working out what a bad idea it is. The record of private operators of prisons & detention facilities is poor.
                        Human beings are the only creatures on Earth that claim a god and the only living thing that behaves like it hasn't got one - Hunter S. Thompson

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                        • #13
                          Some people seem to think there is nothing wrong with privatizing the penal system..really?
                          Have we already forgotten the,

                          Pennsylvania Seeks to Close Books on "Kids for Cash" Scandal

                          One of the biggest corruption scandals to hit America's juvenile justice system began unfolding in 2007, when parents in a central Pennsylvania county began to complain that their children had been tossed into for-profit youth centers without a lawyer to represent them.

                          Over the past eight years, the kickback scheme, known as "kids for cash," has resulted in prison terms for two Luzerne County judges and two businessmen — and convictions of thousands of juveniles have been tossed out.

                          Now the case is entering its final chapter: a few remaining class action lawsuits in which victims are seeking millions of dollars in compensation.

                          One of those claims drew to a close Monday, when a federal judge signed off on a settlement in which one of the businessmen, Robert Powell, would pay $4.75 million. The actual payouts will begin in December, after the plaintiffs choose whether to accept the settlement.

                          Powell, who co-owned two private juvenile justice facilities, served an 18-month prison term after admitting to paying hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes to former Court of Common Pleas Judge Mark Ciavarella Jr. and his boss, Judge Michael Conahan. In return, Ciavarella routinely found children guilty and sent them to Powell's facilities.
                          Do you really want companies that profit from housing imates giving campaign money to judges, or maybe outright kick backs?
                          If you answer yes, you need your head examined!
                          Last edited by Urban hermit; 22 Aug 16, 10:53.
                          Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                          Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BF69 View Post
                            You know something is fundamentally wrong with something when Exo, MMM, TAG & myself are all in agreement. Administering punishment should be the province of the Government.

                            Sadly Australia is doing something it does all too often - jumping on to a bad idea from the US at about the time the US is working out what a bad idea it is. The record of private operators of prisons & detention facilities is poor.
                            One of the unspoken reasons why the US jumped all over private prisons is campaign contributions. The largest contributor to the re-election campaign of Oklahoma's current governor, Mary Fallin, is Corrections Corporation of America. It's gotten so big that CCA is actually traded on the New York Stock Exchange. CXW if you're interested in buying into it.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by phil74501 View Post
                              One of the unspoken reasons why the US jumped all over private prisons is campaign contributions. The largest contributor to the re-election campaign of Oklahoma's current governor, Mary Fallin, is Corrections Corporation of America. It's gotten so big that CCA is actually traded on the New York Stock Exchange. CXW if you're interested in buying into it.
                              Yes. Creating an industry with a financial stake in putting more people in prison is an extraordinarily bad idea. Another good reason to leave this in government hands.
                              Human beings are the only creatures on Earth that claim a god and the only living thing that behaves like it hasn't got one - Hunter S. Thompson

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